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Full text of "Official proceedings of the National Democratic convention, held at New York, July 4-9, 1868"

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OFFlCIAL PROCEEDINGS 



OF Till 



NATIONAL 



DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION, 



NEW YORK, JULY 4-9, 1868. 



REPORTED BY G-EORGE W -A.K E M.A.N , 



(FFICIAL ItEPORTKB OF THE CONVENTION. 



BOSTON : 

ROCK W E L L & KOLLIXS, PRINTERS, 

122 Washington Street. 

1868. 



OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS 



OF THE 



NATIONAL 



DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION, 



NEW YORK, JULY 4-9, 1868. 



REPORTED BY GEOE&E "WAKEMAN, 

OFFICIAL REPORTER OF THE CONVENTION. 



BOSTON : 

ROCKWELL & ROLLINS, PRINTERS, 

122 Washington Street. 

1868. 



\ 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 



New York, Saturday, July 4th, 1868. 

The National Democratic Convention, to nominate candidates for 
the office of President and Vice-President of the United States, 
assembled at Tammany Hall, in the City of New York, at 12 m., 
July 4th, Independence Day, pursuant to the call of the National 
Democratic Executive Committee. 

The Hon. August Belmont, Chairman of the National Democratic 
Committee, appeared upon the platform in the performance of his 
duty of calling the Convention to order, and was greeted with 
loud cheering. When order was completely restored, he spoke as 
follows, — 

Speech of the Hon. August Belmont. 

Gentlemen of the Convention, — It is my privilege to-day to welcome 
you here iu this hall, consti'ucted with so much artistic taste arid tendered to 
you by the time-honored society of Tammany. (Loud cheers.) I welcome 
you to this magnificent temple, erected to the Goddess of Liberty by her 
stauchest defenders and most fervent worshippers. (Applause.) I welcome 
you to this good city of New York, the bulwark of Democracy (Great ap- 
plause), which has rolled back the surging waves of Radicalism through all 
the storms of the last eight years ; and I welcome you, gentlemen, to our 
Empire State, which last fall redeemed herself from Republican misrule by a 
majority of nearly 50,000 votes, and which claims the right to lead the van- 
guard of victory iu the great battle to be fought next November for the pres- 
ervation of our institutions, our laws, aud our liberties. (Great cheering.) 

It is a most auspicious omen that we meet under such circumstances, and 
are surrounded by such associations, and I share your own confident hope of 
the overwhelming success of the ticket and the platform which will be the 
result of your deliberations. (Applause.) For it is to the American people 
that our appeal lies. Their final judgment will be just. The American peo- 
ple will no longer remain deaf to the teachings of the past. They will re- 
member that it was under successive Democratic administrations, based upon 
our national principles, the principles of constitutional liberty, that our coun- 
try rose to a prosperity and greatness unsurpassed in the annals of history; 



4 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

they will remember the days when North and South marched shoulder to 
shoulder together in the conquest of Mexico, which gave us our golden empire 
on the Pacific; our California and our Oregon, now the strongholds of a 
triumphant Democracy (Cheers) ; they will remember the days when peace 
and plenty reigned over the whole Union, when we had no national debt to 
crush the energies of the people, when the Federal tax-gatherer was unknown 
throughout the vast extent of the land, and when the credit of the United 
States stood as high in the money marts of the world as that of any other 
government (Applause) ; and they will remember, with a wise sorrow, that, 
with the downfall of the Democratic party, in 18G0, came- that fearful civil 
war which has brought mourning and desolation into every household ; has 
cost the loss of a million of American citizens, and has left us with a na- 
tional debt the burden of which drains the resources, cripples the industry, 
and impoverishes the labor of the country. (Applause.) They will remember 
that, after the fratricidal strife was over, when the bravery of our army and 
navy and the sacrifices of the people had restored the Union and vindicated 
the supremacy of the law ; when the victor and the vanquished wore equally 
ready to bury the past and to hold out the hand of brotherhood and good-will 
across the graves of their fallen comrades, — it was again the defeat of the 
Democratic candidates in 1864 which prevented this consummation so de- 
voutly wished for by all. Instead of restoring the Southern States to their 
constitutional rights, — instead of trying to wipe out the miseries of the past 
by a magnanimous policy, dictated alike by humanity and sound statesman- 
ship, and so ardently prayed for by the generous heart of the American 
people, — the Radicals in Congress, elected in an evil hour, have placed the 
iron heel of the conqueror upon the South. Austria did not dare to fasten 
upon vanquished Hungary, nor Russia to impose upon conquered Poland, the 
ruthless tyranny now inflicted by Congress upon the Southern States. (Loud 
applause.) Military satraps are invested with dictatorial power, overriding 
the decisions of the courts, and assuming the functions of the civil authori- 
ties; the whole populations are disfranchised or forced to submit to test 
oaths alike revolting to justice and civilization ; and a debased and ignorant 
race, just emerged from servitude, is raised unto power to control the desti- 
nies of that fair portion of our common country. (Applause.) These men, 
elected to be legislators, and legislators only, trampling the Constitution under 
their feet, have usurped the functions of the Executive and the Judiciary, and 
it is impossible to doubt, after the events of the past few months, and the 
circumstances of the impeachment trial, that they will not shrink from an 
attempt hereafter to subvert the Senate of the United States, which alone 
stood between them and their victim, and which had virtue enough left not 
to allow the American name to be utterly disgraced, and justice to be dragged 
in the dust. (Cheers.) In order to carry out this nefarious programme, our 
army and navy are kept in times of profound peace on a scale which involves 
a yearly expenditure of from one to two hundred millions; prevents the re- 
duction of our national debt, and imposes upon our people a system of the 
most exorbitant and unequal taxation, with a vicious, irredeemable, and de- 
preciated currency. (Applause.) And now this same party, which has 
brought all these evils upon the country, comes again before the 
American people, asking for their suffrages; and whom has it chosen 
for its candidate? The General commanding the Armies of the United States. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 

Can there be any doubt left as to the designs of the Radicals, if they should 
be able to keep their hold on the reins of government? They intend Cun- 
gressional usurpation of all the branches and functions of the Government, to be 
enforced by the bayonets of a military despotism ! (Loud applause.) It is im- 
possible that a free and intelligent people can longer submit to such a state 
of things. They will not calmly stand by to see their liberties subverted, 
the prosperity and greatness of their country undermined, and the institu- 
tions bequeathed to them by the fathers of the Republic wrested from them. 
(Cheers.) They must see that the conservative and national principles of a 
liberal and progressive Democracy are the only safeguards of the Republic. 
Gentlemen of the Convention : Your country looks to you to stay this tide of 
disorganization, violence, and despotism. It will not look in vain, when next 
November the roll shall be called, and when State after State shall respond, 
by rallying around the broad banner of Democracy, on which, in the future, 
as in the past, will be inscribed our undying motto: " The Union, the Con- 
stitution, and the Laws!" 

Mr. Belmont closed amid enthusiastic and long-continued cheer- 
ing. When the applause had subsided, Mr. Belmont resumed, — 

Gentlemen, — I have the honor to nominate, as temporary Chairman of 
this Convention, the Hon. Henry L. Palmer, of Wisconsin. The nomination 
was received with loud cheers. Mr. Palmer, on coming forward, was re- 
ceived with applause, and spoke as follows, — 

Speech of the Temporary Chairman. 

Gentlemen of the Convention, — Permit me to return to you my most 
sincere acknowledgments for the high compliment you have conferred upon 
my State, and the great honor you have chosen to bestow upon me, in the 
choice you have made of a temporary presiding officer of this Convention. 
Permit me to assure you, gentlemen, that, during the brief period I shall 
have occasiou to discharge the duties of the chair, I shall bring to bear such 
ability as I may possess to discharge those duties with perfect fairness to all 
the States, and to all the delegates. I do not regard myself competent, and 
if I did, I should not regard it as my duty, in occupying the chair tempora- 
rily, to enter into any general discussion of the political situation of the day, 
or to advise or seek to instruct this Convention in regard to the performance 
of its labors. I may, however, be permitted to congratulate you, and to 
congratulate our country at large, that, on this bright and beautiful anniver- 
sary of our nation's birth, once more a Convention of the Democracy of this 
country is assembled in which all the States are represented (Enthusiastic 
cheering; many of the audience rising and waving their handkerchiefs), and 
in which delegates from the East, and from the West, and from the North, 
and from the South, all come here and unite together to perform a great 
work for our common couutiy. (Long-continued applause.) And permit me 
to express the hope that this fact may be an omen of a unity of sentiment in 
this Convention which shall enable you to produce such a work as will com- 
mend itself to the approval of the people of our whole country, and thus 
wrest it from the hands which seek its destruction. (Loud applause.) 



b OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

Again thanking you, gentlemen, for the compliment you have chosen to pay 
me, I have the pleasure of presenting to the Convention the Rev. Dr. Mor- 
gan, of New York. 

Rev. Dr. Morgan, the Rector of St. Thomas's Church, New York, 
then offered an impressive prayer as follows, the whole Convention 
rising, — 

Prayer. 

O Lord, who art the blessed and only Potentate, the King of Kings, and 
Lord of Lords, the Almighty Ruler of Nations, we adore and magnify Thy 
glorious name for all the great things which Thou hast done for us. We 
render Thee thanks for the goodly heritage which Thou hast given us; for 
the civil and religious privileges which we enjoy, and for the multiplied man- 
ifestations of Thy favor toward us. Grant that we may show forth our 
thankfulness for these, Thy mercies, by liviug in reverence of Thy Almighty 
power and dominion, in humble reliance on Thy goodness and mercy, and in 
holy obedience to Thy righteous laws. Preserve, we beseech Thee, to our 
country, the blessings of peace; restore them to nations deprived of them, 
and secure them to all the people of the earth. May the Kingdom of the 
Prince of Peace come, and, reigning in the hearts and lives of men, unite 
them in holy fellowship, that so their only strife may be, who shall show 
forth with most humble and holy fervor the praises of Him who both loved 
them and made them kings and priests unto God. We implore Thy blessing 
on all in legislative, judicial, and executive authority, that they may have 
grace, wisdom, and understanding to discharge their duties as most effectu- 
ally to promote Thy glory, the interests of true religion and virtue, and the 
peace, good order, and welfare of the nation. Especially do we pray that 
the deliberations of this Convention may be ordained and settled by Thy 
governance upon the best and surest foundation; that peace and happiness, 
truth and justice, religion and piety may be established among us for all 
generations. Give to its officers wisdom, and to its members a sound mind; 
and may all their doings tend to Thy glory, and to the safety, honor, and 
welfare of thy people. Continue, O Lord, to prosper our institutions for the 
promotion of sound learning, the diffusion of virtuous education, the ad- 
vancement of Christian truth, ami for the purity and prosperity of Thy 
Church. Change, we beseech Thee, every evil heart of unbelief, and shed the 
quickening influences of Thy Holy Spirit on all the people of this land. 
Save us from the guilt of abusing the blessings of prosperity to luxury and 
licentiousness, to irreligion and vice, lest we provoke Thee, in just judg- 
ment, to visit our offences with a rod, and our sins with scourges. O A1-, 
mighty God, who hast never failed those who put their trust in Thee, imprint 
on our hearts, we beseech Thee, a deep and habitual sense of this great 
truth, that the only securit}' for the coutiuuauce of the blessings which we 
enjoy consists in our acknowledgment of Thy sovereign and gracious 
Providence, and in humble and holy submission to the Gospel of Thy Son, 
Jesus Christ, to whom all power is given in heaven and on earth, and who is 
one with the Father, and the Holy Ghost, in the eternal Godhead, — our 
Mediator, and Redeemer. Amen. 

The Rules for the Temporary Organization. 

General McCook, of Ohio. — Mr. Chairman, I move for the adoption by the 
Convention, before any other business is proceeded with, a resolution which 
I presume will meet with unanimous concurrence. 

Resolved, That, until the Convention shall otherwise provide, the rules of the 
House of Representatives shall govern the deliberations of this body. 

The motion was seconded. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 7 

Mr. Erastus Brooks, of New York. — Mr. Chairman, there are many gen- 
tlemen in the Convention who do not recognize the rules of the present House 
of Representatives. (Cheers.) I trust the gentleman will accept as an amend- 
ment, that the rules which govern deliberative bodies shall be the rules of 
this Convention until otherwise ordered. (Applause.) 

General McCook. — I would gladly accept the amendment of the gen- 
tleman on my right, but he does me great injustice if he thinks I would 
move the adoption of the rules of the present House, if I did not know that 
they had not dared to change one of the time-honored rules that were estab- 
lished under Democratic auspices. (Applause.) It is best, in my opinion, 
that we should adopt, for the present, the rules of the House of Repre- 
sentatives, for reasons winch, I think, every gentleman who has taken part 
in National Conventions will appreciate upon reflection. I ca'nuot, there- 
fore, accept the amendment of the gentleman on my right (Mr. Brooks). 

Gov. Richardson, of Illinois. — I agree with the gentleman from Ohio, 
that we should adopt the rules of the House of Representatives, but I have 
a single suggestion to make. I do not know whether this Radical Con- 
gress have overthrown any of the important rules of the House of Repre- 
sentatives, but they have done so much damage, so much mischief, so 
much outrage, and so much of wrong, that they may have violated some of 
these rules. I therefore ask my friend from Ohio to go back and accept 
the rules as they existed in 1SG0, before these Radical assaults had been 
made upon the time-honored usages of our country. (Applause.) 

Mr. Francis Kkrnan, of Oueida, N. Y. — Mr. Chairman, I would submit to 
our friends that there is a better rule to govern our action than proposed by 
either of the gentlemen, — one time-honored, one that has always been sat- 
isfactory to Democrats. I therefore, sir, suggest and move as an amendment 
that, until otherwise ordered, we adopt as the rules to govern our delibera- 
tions, the rules which have governed Democratic Conventions heretofore. 
(Applause.) These, sir, we know have not been changed; these we know 
have not been tampered with by Radicals, and they were found wise and 
satisfactory. I move, as an amendment to the amendment of the gentleman 
from New York, that we adopt the rules of the Convention of 1864. (Ap- 
plause.) 

The Chairman. — The Chair requests that, until he becomes more familiar 
with the delegates, each gentleman, as he rises in his seat, will announce 
his name. 

Mr. S. S. Cox. — Mr. Chairman, I was about to say almost what has 
been said by the gentleman from New York. The rules which have been 
adopted heretofore by the National Conventions, as in 1860, were the rules 
of the House of Representatives (Applause) ; but the House of Representa- 
tives from time to time have changed these rules. I have a copy here of 
the rules adopted by the last Democratic National Convention. I hope my 
friend from Ohio will accept this as an amendment to his resolution upon the 
subject, — 

Resolved, That the rules of the last Democratic Convention govern this 
body until otherwise ordered. 

I move that, sir, as an amendment. 

General McCook. — I shall be very happy to accept the amendment made 
by the gentleman from Illinois (Mr. Richardson), that we adopt the rules of 



8 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

the House of Representatives as they existed in 1800. That preserves us 
from any erroneous rules with which persous on this floor are not acquainted; 
but I cannot accept the amendment of the gentleman from New York, sec- 
onded by the gentleman from New York, whose face is quite familiar to peo- 
ple from Ohio (Mr. Cox). I accept the amendment of the gentleman from 
Illinois (Mr. Richardson). 

Mr. Reeve, of Indiana. — If this motion would directly or indirectly abro- 
gate the two-thirds rule, then I warn gentlemen to be careful before they vote. 

The Chairman. — The Chair will state the position of the question as he 
understands it. The gentleman from Ohio offered a resolution which pro- 
vides for the adoption of the rules of the House of Representatives to govern 
the Convention until otherwise ordered. The gentleman from New York 
(Mr. Brooks) proposes an amendment, which the Chair does not understand 
has been withdrawn. 

Mr. Erastus Brooks, of New York. — I withdraw the amendment, and ac- 
cept the amendment moved by Mr. Cox, of New York. (Applause.) 

The Chairman. — The Chair understands, the amendment of the gentleman 
from New York being withdrawn, that the amendment of the gentleman from 
Illinois (Mr. Richardson) will be in order. 

A Voice. — It has been accepted by the mover. 

General McCook. — I accept the amendment of Mr. Richardson. 

The Chairman. — The question will then recur upon the amendment 
offered by the gentleman from New York. Is the Convention ready for the 
question? 

Mr. Kerxax, of New York. — I desire to inquire of the mover whether, 
if we adopt his motion, we do not abolish, without any consideration, 
the two-thirds rule, which has prevailed generally in Democratic Conventions? 

General McCook. — If the two-thirds rule ever applied in a Democratic 
Convention, except on a vote on the nomination for President, the dele- 
gates from Ohio hear it now for the first time. 

Mr. Kerxax. — We desired to know what was the understanding. 

General McCook. — This resolution provides for the temporary organi- 
zation and government of the Convention, until it shall otherwise provide, 
which will be done by a Committee on Rules and on Permanent Organiza- 
tion Monday morning. 

Mr. Richardson. — There is no difficulty about this question if we un- 
derstand ourselves. We all agree that this is to govern us while we are 
in temporary existence. The Committee on Permanent Organization con- 
siders the question referred to by the gentlemen from New York, and we 
are cut off from nothing. We are doing nothing more than we have done 
at every Democratic Convention for the last twenty-four years. 

Mr. Steele, of California. —I rise to ask whether the amendment which 
we are asked to vote for at the present time is the amendment offered by 
the gentleman from New York, that the rulps of the last Convention are 
to govern us until the permanent organization of this Convention? 

The Chairman. — The resolution of the gentleman from Ohio, as it now 
stands, is as follows, — 

Resolved, — That, until the Convention shall otherwise provide, the rules 
of the House of Representatives, prior to I860, shall be the rules to govern 
this Convention. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 9 

The amendment proposed is to strike out all after the word " Resolved." 
and insert the followiug, — " That the rides of the last National Democratic 
Convention govern this body until otherwise directed." 

Cries, '•Question!" "question!" 

The amendment prevailed and the resolution as amended was adopted . 

The Chairman. — Permit me to suggest to the Convention, that the Na- 
tional Executive Committee have suggested the name of Mr. E. O. Perrin, 
of New York, as temporary Secretary of the Convention. I will put the 
question upon his appointment. 

The appointment was agreed to. 

Mr. J. M. Tower was selected as Assistant Secretar}'. 

Mr. HiesterClymer, of Pa. — I beg leave to oner the following resolution, — 

Resolved, that a committee of one from each State be selected by the re 
spective delegations whose duty it shall be to select permanent officers for 
this Convention. 

Mr. John A. Green, of New York. — I rise to a point of order. I think 
it is proper that the States be called in their order, and that the names and 
credentials of delegates be presented by the chairmen of delegations before 
further proceedings are taken. 

The Chairman. — The Chair desires to say to the Convention that the 
temporary organization has been effected, and that thus far that is all that 
has been done except to adopt the rules to govern this temporary organi- 
zation. The call under which this Convention is assembled will now be 
read by the Secretary, if there is no objection, before entertaining the reso- 
lution offered by the gentleman from Pennsylvania. 

The Secretary then read the call, as follows, — 

Call for the Convention. 

The National Democratic Committee, by virtue of the authority conferred 
upou them by the last National Democratic Convention, at a meeting held 
this day, at Washington, D. C, voted to hold the next Convention for the 
purpose of nominating candidates for President and Vice-President of the 
United States, on the 4th day of July, 1868, at 12 o'clock M., in the City of 
New York. 

The basis of representation, as fixed by the last Democratic Convention, is 
double the number of Senators and Representatives in Congress in each State 
under the last apportionment. 

Each State is invited to send delegates accordingly. 

S. R. LYMAN", JOSIAH MINOT, H. B. SMITH, 

WM. M. CONVERSE, GIDEON BRADFORD, W. G. STEEL, 

W. A. GAILBRAITH, JOHN A. NICHOLSON, ODIN BOWIE, 

JAMES GUTHRIE, L. S. TRIMBLE, RUFUS P. RANNEY, 

W. E. NIBLACK, WILBER F. STOREY, W. L. BANCROFT, 

LEWIS V. BOGY, GEORGE H. PAUL, D. 0. FINCH, 

ISAAC E. EATON, THOMAS HAYNES, WILLIAM McMILLAN, 

WILLIAM AIKEN, ABSALOM H. CHAPPELL, GEORGE A. HOUSTON, 

JOSEPH A. ROZIER, A. B. GREENWOOD, JOHN W. LEFTWICH, 

THOMAS SWEENEY, JOHN PATRICK, JAMES W. McCOCKLE, 

W. L. SHARKEY, JOHN HANCOCK, JOHN H. McKINNEY, 

FREDERICK 0. PRINCE, Secretary. AUGUST BELMONT, Chairman. 

Washington, February 22, 1808. 



10 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

Mr. Green, of New York. — I move that the States be called in their order, 
and the chairman of each delegation hand in the names of delegates. 

The Chairman. — The gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. Clymer) offered 
a resolution. 

Mr. Clymer. — I will say that if it is the express desire of the Convention 
that the roll of States be called, I will withdraw my resolution temporarily. 
I offered it after consultation with the members of the National Committee, 
who suggested that the proper time to offer it would be after the electiou of 
the temporary Chairman and Secretary. I did so in obedience to their sug- 
gestion. 

Mr. Stuart, of Michigan. — I will trouble this Convention but a moment. 
The common practice is to appoint a Committee on Credentials. The chairman 
of that committee announces when they will meet. Each delegation presents 
to that chairman its credentials. That is short and easy, and does not occupy 
the time of the Convention. The motion that was made to appoint a com- 
mittee to recommend a permanent organization was in order; one for the 
Committee on Credentials will also be in order, and we will save hours if we 
take that course. 

Mr. Clymer, of Pennsylvania. — The only precedent we have in this mat- 
ter is the action at Charleston, where the seats of Illinois aud New York 
were contested. The motion for a Committee on Permanent Organization 
was made at that time by General McCook. of Ohio. An attempt was made 
to amend the motion in various forms, and the final action was that a Com- 
mittee on Organization and a Committee on Credentials were appointed by the 
Same resolution. I have not heard that there are any contested seats at this 
time in this Convention. I believe that there is no discord iu the Democratic 
party (Cheers), and think no committee absolutely necessary on credentials, 
and therefore I offered but a single resolution. If any gentleman desires so to 
amend it as to embrace a Committee on Credentials I shall have no objection. 

Mr. Stuart. — I move that amendment. 

Mr. Clymer. — I accept the amendment. 

The Chairman. — The Chair understood the gentleman from Pennsylvania 
to withdraw his resolution. 

Mr. Clymer. — Temporarily. 

The Chairman. — Temporarily, to allow the motion of the gentleman 
from New York (Mr. Green) to be entertained. That motion is now the 
pending question. It is that the roll of States be called by the Secretary. 

Mr. Green. — I beg leave to explain. My motion was that the roll of 
States be called, and that the chairman of the delegation from each State hand 
in to the Secretary a list of the delegates from that State ; not that the roll 
of delegates be called, because that would take too much time. 

The Chairman. — So the Chair understood. Is the Convention ready for 
the question? 

Cries — " Question ! " " question ! " 

Mr. Clymer. — I do not conceive that there is any list of delegates. 

The Chairman. — The list of States is what is meant. 

Mr. Kichardson, of Illinois. — In order to get rid of that question, for 
which there is no necessity, I move to lay it on the table. 

The motion to lay it on the table was seconded and prevailed. 

Mr. Clymer. —I beg leave to renew mv motion. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 11 

The Secretary read the resolution offered by Mr. Cltmer (as 
amended) as follows, — 

Resolved, That a committee of one from each State be selected by the 
respective delegations, whose duty it shall be to select permanent officers 
of this Convention, and one also from each State upon credentials. 

A Delegate from Montana. — I desire to add a slight amendment to the 
resolution, so that it may read " each State and Territory." 

Mr. Steele, of California, moved as an amendment to Mr. Cly- 

mer's resolution, the following, — 

Resolved, That a committee of one from each State and Territory repre- 
sented be appointed by the several delegations, to constitute a Committee on 
Credentials, and upon Permanent Organization to nominate permanent officers 
of the Convention, and upon the order of business, with instructions to report 
at the reassembling of the Convention on Monday, the 6th instant. 

The Chairman announced the question to be on the amendment. 

Mr. Clymer. — One moment. It may be possible that if a Committee on 
Organization be appointed at this session, and if it be the pleasure of the 
Convention to have another session at a later hour this day, it may be 
able to report officers for permanent organization, and thereby save much 
valuable time to many gentlemen from distant portions of the Union. (Ap- 
plause.) Therefore I do not desire the amendment to prevail, because 
it would bind the Convention not to assemble again, or at least not to 
organize permanently until Monday next. I trust that the gentleman from 
California will not press the adoption of the amendment. This is the ouly 
material difference between his amendment and the resolution offered by my- 
self; his contemplates only one committee tp perform both duties. I have 
no objection to that; but I have objections to wasting the time of the dele- 
gates until the committee reports. 

A Delegate. — I would ask whether that resolution contemplates Territo- 
rial representation, either in the committees or in the permanent organization 
of the Convention? 

The Chairman. — It does. 

The same Delegate. — Then I am opposed to it. 

Mr. Steele. — As I offered that amendment, I desire to say a few words in 
regard to it. Iu the first place, if you have a committee organized now for 
the purpose of a permanent organization, they will have no advice whatever 
as to who are the delegates to this Convention from the various States. 
They must have legal information of that fact before they can advance intel- 
ligently to the important business which will come before the Convention. 
We must know that the men who are here upon this floor are elected to seats 
in this Convention from the States within the Union. There is another 
proposition. Although the Territories of the North-west are not entitled to 
vote upon the Presidential question, yet their people are subject to the 
government of the United States, and they should be represented here in the 
making of the nominations to be voted upon by the States ; and they should 
be permitted to advise here with the people of the States, so that officers may 
be selected for the administration of the government who will be agreeable 
to them as well as to the States. It is true that they cannot participate with 
us in the election; but they have as vital an interest in the ultimate decision 
of the great questions of this contest as have the citizens of any other part 



-..d 



12 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

of the country ; and, therefore, I say that their representatives should have 
seats upon this floor. 

Mr. Thomas B. Bradfokd, of Delaware. — I move that the amendment 
offered by the gentleman from California be laid upon the table. 

Mr. Clymer. — That will carry the original resolution with it. I hope that 
gentleman will consider its effect. I hope it will be voted down instead of 
being '.aided. 

Mr. Richard D. Rice, of Maine. — Will you be kind enough to state the 
effect of that resolution? 

The Chairman. — The gentleman from California (Mr. Steele) proposes to 
amend the resolution of the gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. Clymer). 
The gentleman from Delaware moves to lay that on the table. If that motion 
prevails both the amendment and the resolution will be laid ou the table. 

Mr. Bradford. — I withdraw the motion to lay ou the table. 

Mr. Bernard Schwartz, of Missouri. — I move to strike out that part 
the resolution tlxing the time that the report shall be made on Monday. .. , 
iusert instead, to report at three o'clock this afternoon to this Convention. 

Mr. Steele. — I accept the amendment. 

A Delegate from NEW Jersey. — Will the Chairman state the question 
again? 

The Chairman-. — The question will now be upon the amendment proposed 
by the gentleman from California, as it has been modified, providing that the 
committee report this afternoon at three o'clock. 

The amendment of the gentleman from California was lost, and the 
question recurred on Mr. Clyraer's resolution. 

Mr. W. B. Machf.x, of Kentucky. — I ask for a reading of the resolution. 
The resolution was read. 

Mr. Clymer, of Pennsylvania. — I wish to accept the amendment which 
•was proposed, so that the resolution will read " each State and Territory." I 
propose to accept it for the purpose of gratifying our friends from the ex- 
treme West. 

Mr. J. M. Cavanaugh, of Montana, said he represented the Territory of 
Montana as a delegate. There were no more earnest or zealous people for 
the cause of Democracy in the land than the people of Montana. It was 
true, they had no vote in the Electoral College. But they had hearts and 
voices and influence, and they would do. an 1 he would do, in his feeble way, 
as much for the ticket to be named by this Convention as any others in the 
country. He urged that no invidious distinction should be made in the Con- 
vention between a State and a Territory. 

Mr. Stanton, of Kentucky, moved the previous question, which 
prevailed. 

The question recurring on the adoption of the resolution, it was 
again read. 

General McCook, of Illinois. — Mr. Chairman, I rise to a point of order, and 
my point of order is this: that this is a Convention of States, and not of 
Territories. They were not included in the call, and it is the first time in a 
Democratic Convention in which there has ever been heard a talk of the ad- 
mission of delegates, except from the sovereign States of the Union. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 13 

Mr. George W. Brewer, of Pennsylvania.— I rise to a point of order- 
This Convention has, by resolution, adopted the rules that regulated the Con- 
vention of 18(J0. These rules are now the law of this body. By the rules and 
regulations of that Convention, the Territories are not to be represented 
upon the floor by delegates to the Convention. 

The vote was then taken on the resolution of Mr. Clymer, as mod- 
ified to include Territories, and it was declared in the negative. 

A division being called for, the Chair directed the roll of States to 
be called, and the chairman of each delegation to announce the vote 
of his State. 

The roll of States was then called with the following result, — 

Alabama Nay Mississippi Nay 

California Aye Nebraska Aye 

Connecticut Nay Nevada Aye 

Delaware Nay New Hampshire Aye 

Florida Nay New Jersey Aye 

Georgia Aye New York Nay 

Illinois Nay North Carolina Nay 

Iowa Aye Ohio Aye 

Kansas, equally divided Oregon Nay 

Maine Nay Pennsylvania Aye 

Maryland Aye Rhode Island Nay 

Massachusetts Aye Texas Aye 

Michigan Nay West Virginia Nay 

Missouri Aye Wisconsin Nay 

Minnesota Aye 

On the call of Illinois, Mr. Richardson said, — The State of Illinois gives 
her vote as a unit, nay. 

Mr. Dowdall, of Illinois. — I wish to say that thirteen of our delegation 
desire to vote aye upon that resolution. 

Mr. Richardson. — The State of Illinois required her delegation in this 
Convention to vote as a unit, and in compliance with that resolution I cast 
the vote of Illinois nay. 

Mr. Dowdall. — We were requested to vote as a unit for a candidate for 
President, but for nothing else; and the delegates believe that they have a 
right to vote on all other questions as they prefer. In our State Convention 
we were instructed to cast our vote as a unit for Mr. Pendleton for President, 
and for no one else : we are prepared to do that ; but we are not instructed to 
act as a unit in any other matters. There are thirteen of our delegation that 
desire the admission of delegates from the Territories, and we wish to vote 
as we think is right and proper, and not according to the notions of our 
chairman. 

Mr. Richardson. — I have cast the vote of two-thirds of our delegation. 
Our instructions were to cast the vote of the delegation as a unit; I have 
carried out that instruction, and intend to carry out that instruction. I am 
instructed by a decided majority of our delegation to cast the vote as I have. 

A Delegate from Illinois. — Mr. Chairman, I have but a word to say : We 
may as well settle this difference at this point as at any other. The difficulty 
arises from a mere difference of opinion as to how far our instructions go. 
On the question of voting for President we have no difference of opinion. On 
that question we shall vote at all times as we are instructed, — as a unit. On 



14 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

other questions a portion of our delegation believe that we have a right to 
vote without any instructions whatever. It is for the President of the Con- 
vention, having this resolution before him, and knowing our status in regard 
to it, to determine this difference of opinion between us. My own opinion is 
that we have a right to vote as we see fit on this question, — each delegate 
being responsible for his own vote. I desire to vote aye. 

Mr. Dowdall. — I desire to vote aye, and was informed that thirteen of 
our delegates desired to vote the same way. If I am wrongly informed I 
withdraw my objection. , 

The Chair then announced the vote as follows : Aj r es, 106 ; nays, 

184. 

Mr. Clymek, of Pennsylvania, offered the following, — 

Resolved, That there now shall be two committees appointed, each com- 
mittee to consist of one delegate from each State, to be selected by the 
respective delegates thereof; one committee to act as a Committee on Per- 
manent Organization, and the other as a Committee on Credentials. 

The resolution was adopted. 

Mr. Clymer.— I move the call of the roll of States for the purpose of having 
the gentlemen selected on the committees announced. 

The Chairman. — The Secretary will call the roll of States, and the chairman 
of each delegation will please announce and pass up the names of the dele- 
gates selected for members of the Committees on Permanent Organization 
and on Credentials. 

The Committee on Credentials. 

The roll of delegates was then called, and the following gentle- 
men were selected as a Committee on Credentials, — 

Alabama — W. H. Barnes. Missouri — 8. L. Sawyer. 

Arkansas — E. C. Boudiuot. Nebraska -*- John Black. 

California — A. Jacoby. Nevada — J. E. Doyle. 

Connecticut — M. Bulkley. New Hampshire — J. Proctor. 

Delaware — C. W. Wright. Neio Jersey — J. R. Mullauey. 

Florida — A. Hevvling. New York — J. A. Hardenburgh. 

Georgia — E. II. Pottle. North Carolina — Gen. W. R. Cox. 

Illinois — T. A. Hoyne. Ohio — W. Griswold. 

Indiana — Charles H. Reeve. Oregon — O. Joynt. 

Ioica — J. D. Test. Pennsylvania — Gen. W. H. Miller. 

Kansas— W. Shannon, Jr. Rhode Island-* W- Hale. 

Kentucky — J. B. McCreary. South Carolina — W. D. Simpson. 

Louisiana — D. D. Laponte. Tennessee — J. P. House. 

Maine — I. T. Drew. Texas — H. Boughtou. 

Maryland — G. F. Maddox. Vermont — W. Brigbam. 
Massachusetts — George W. Gill. Virginia — George Blow. 

Michigan — B. G. Stout. West Virginia — J. J. Davis. 

Minnesota — W. A. Gorman. Wisconsin— S. A. Pease. 
Mississippi — P. M. Brown. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 15 

TJie Committee on Organization. 

The following gentlemen were selected a Committee on Organiza- 
tion, — 

Alabama — J. H. Clauton. Missouri — W. H. D. Hunter. 

Arkansas — J. S. Dunham. Nebraska — G. L. Miller. 

California — E. Steele. Nevada — G. G. Berry. 

Connecticut — J. A. Hovey. New Hampshire — I. Adams. 

Delaware — C. Beasten. New Jersey — Henry S. Little. 

Florida — A. J. Seeler. New York — General J. A. Green. Jr. 

Georgia — C. Peeples. North Carolina — W. N. R. Smith. 

Illinois — W. R. Morrison. Ohio — F. C. LeBlond. 

Indiana — S. A. Buskirk. Oregon — N. M. Bell. 

Iowa — W. F. Braman. Pennsylvania — H. Clymer. 

Kansas — T. P. Fenlon. Ithode Island — L. Pierce. 

Kentucky — W. B. Machen. South Carolina — Carlos Tracey, 

Louisiana — G. W. McCramie. Tennessee — General W. B. Bate. 

Maine — J. E. Madigan. Texas — J. M. Burroughs. 

Maryland — A. R. Syester. Vermont — J. D. Deavitt. 

Massachusetts — Johu R. Briggs. Virginia — J. A. Barbour. 

Michigan — John Moore. West Virginia — H. S.Walker. 

Minnesota — E. A. McMahoa. Wisconsin — S. Clark. 

Mississijyri — B . Matthews. 

Mr. Wixg, of New York. — I move the adoption of the following resolu- 
tion, — 

Eesolved, That the two committees just appointed be instructed to report 
at five o'clock this evening; and that this Convention stand adjourn until that 
hour, when adjourned. 

Applause. 

Mr. Clymer. — I move to insert seven o'clock this evening. 
Mr. Reed, of Pennsylvania. — I move to strike out seven o'clock, and 
insert six o'clock. 

The question was taken on the amendment to insert six o'clock, 
which was lost. The question was then taken on the amendment to 
insert seven o'clock, which prevailed. 

The resolution as amended was adopted. 

Mr. Kerb, of Pennsylvania. — I now move that on the reassembling of this 
Convention, the Secretary be directed to read the Declaration of Indepen- 
dence. We are the disciples of the man who wrote that instrument ninety- 
two years ago, at a time, sir, when we were colonies. Now we are a great 
people, and we ought to teach a lesson of our reverence for the charter of 
our liberties, and rebuke the Republican party in power for its tyranny and 
oppression. 

The motion prevailed. 

Mr. II. C. Murphy, of New York, offered the following resolution, — 

Besolved, That a committee of one delegate, from each State, to be selected 
by the delegation thereof, be appointed to report resolutions, and that all 
resolutions in relation to the platform of the Democratic party be referred to 
said committee without debate. 



16 



OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 



Mr. W. W. Eaton, of Connecticut. — I think that the resolutions ought to 
be read in the hearing of the Convention, — not debated, but read. With that 
amendment, 1 have no objection to the motion ; but every resolution that is 
to form apart of the platform of the great National Democratic party ought 
to be read in the hearing of the Convention. 

Mr. Murphy. — I perfectly coucur with the gentleman from Connecticut, 
and I think a fair construction of the resolution contemplates the reading, 
but not the debating, of resolutions. 

The resolution was adopted. 

The Secretary then received from the chairman of the different 
delegations the names of the Committee on Resolutions and Plat- 
form, as follows, — 

The Committee on Resolutions. 



Alabama — Charles C. Langdon. 
Arkansas — W. H. Garland. 
California — A. II. Rose. 
Connecticut — T. E. Doolittle. 
Delaware — James A. Bayard. 
Florida — W. McCall. 
Georgia — Henry S. Fitch. 
Illinois — Wm. J. Allan. 
Indiana — J. E. Macdonald. 
loioa — J. H. O'Neill. 
Kansas — Geo. W. Glick. 
Kentucky — Wm. Preston. 
Louisiana — J. B. Eustis. 
Maine — R. D. Rice. 
Maryland — Stephenson Archer. 
Massachusetts — Edward Avery. 
Michigan — Charles E. Stuart. 
Minnesota — J. J. Green. 
Mississippi — E. Barksdale. 



Missouri — Charles A. Mansur. 
Nebraska — Charles F. Porter. 
Nevada— J. A. St. Clair. 
New Hampshire — J. M. Campbell. 
New Jersey — Jacob R. Wortendyke. 
New York — Henry C. Murphy. 
North Carolina— R. Strange. 
Ohio — William J. Gilmore. 
Oregon — R. I). Fitch. 
Pennsylvania — F. W. Hughes. 
Bhode Island — Thomas Steere. 
South Carolina — Wade Hampton. 
Tennessee — E. Cooper. 
Texas— Geo. W. Smith. 
Vermont — Charles M. Davenport. 
Virginia — T. A. Bocock. 
West Virginia — John J. Davis. 
Wisconsin — James A. Mallory. 



Mr. Reeve, of Indiana, offered the following resolution, — 
Resolved, That the Committee on Permanent Organization be required to 

include a Sergeant-at- Arms us one of the officers of the Convention proper, 

to be selected by the Convention. 

Mr. Brewer, of Pennsylvania, moved an amendment, as follows, — 
Kesolved, That the committee appointed to report officers for the perma- 
nent organization, be instructed to report rules for the government of this 
Convention. 

Mr. Reeve. — In presenting my resolution to iuclude the Sergeant-at- 
Arms, I wish to make this remark : I am informed, and believe it to be true, 
that the Sergeant-at-Arms of this body has been appointed by the National 
Executive Committee, with power to select his subordinates. That is all 
very well for a temporary organization, but, with all due respect to the Chair- 
man of the Executive Committee, I think that that is a patronage which be- 
longs to the Convention, and not to any one man, or set of men, to be dis- 
tributed by them without the consent of the Convention. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 17 

The question was upon the amendment offered by Mr. Brewer, 
which prevailed. 

The original resolution offered b}' Mr. Reeve was then adopted as 
amended. 

Mr. Emery, of Maine, inquired what provision had been made for 
the accommodation of spectators at the next session. 

Mr. C. H. Reeve, of Indiana, offered the following resolution, — 

7,'. solved, That a committee of one from each State be appointed, to be se- 
lected by the chairman of each delegation, whose duty it shall be to Inquire 
into the admission of visitors to the Convention, the distribution of tickets 
therefor, and the other legitimate matters connected with the occupation of 
the hall, for the convenience of delegates, and report by resolution or other- 
wise, for the action of this Convention. 

Mr. August Belmont. — Mr. Chairman, each delegate has had his allot- 
ment of tickets to be distributed to as many spectators as the hall will hold. 
The tickets will be given out in this manner for each day of the Conven- 
tion. It is the way this matter has been arranged at three former Con- 
ventions, where I was on the committee, and it is the first time that fault 
has been found with the action of the committee, if this resolution is dic- 
tated by such a feeling. I move that the resolution be laid on the table. 

Mr. C. IT. Reeve, of Indiana. — I know the motion is not debatable, but I 
wish to ask, if this motion prevails, if it is the final disposition of it? 

The Chairman. — It is. 

The motion to table prevailed. 

The Chairman. — The Chair has received a telegram, which the Secretary 
will read to the Convention. 

The despatch was read, as follows, — 

Please announce to the Convention that the Democratic Association of 
Philadelphia, now assembled, promises the electoral vote of Pennsylvania to 
the nominee of the Convention. (Loud cheers.) 

Mr. E. Steele, of California, presented the following resolutions, 
which were referred to the Committee on Resolutions, — 

Whereas, The history of our country for the last few months has developed 
one or more glaring defects in the Constitution of these United States, — feat- 
ures that in themselves by a simple administration in honesty, truth, and the 
spirit in which they were enacted, could work no wrong, — wdiich when sub- 
ject to the interpretation of a corrupt political body; working under the con- 
trol of ambitious and unscrupulous leaders, whose only aim is at any hazard 
to perpetuate their own power, can, and may be used as a fearful engine for 
the purpose of smothering political freedom and integrity ; and 

Whereas, But for the stern and unflinching integrity of the President of the 
United States, Andrew Johnson, and of his faithful Cabinet advisers (except- 
ing always therefrom Edwin M. Stanton), the political control of the nation 
would have been usurped by the congressional majority of the Republican 
party and a Dictatorship and Privy Council in perpetuity would have been 
established in lieu of our free representative Democratic government; and 

Whereas, The ambitious leaders of the dominant party in Congress have 
endeavored through the form, but in total disregard of the spirit, of constitu- 
tional law, by party regulations and discipline, to remove the obstacle to their 
ambition, by the form of impeachment for high crimes and misdemeanors in 
oflice, themselves the prosecutors, the judges, and jurors, upon specilications 
2 



18 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

showing only an honest disregard of that high functionary of party usages, 
rules, and domination, where the safety of the countiy, the liberties of the 
people, and the unity, permanency, and prosperity of the nation was con- 
cerned; and 

Whereas, The result has shown, in the narrow escape of the honored Chief 
Magistrate from machinations of his and the nation's determined and unre- 
lenting enemies, the fearful vortex into which our country is liable to be 
plunged by vesting in any political body judicial functions; and 

Whereas, Of the large majority of Republican Senators constituting the 
Senate of the United States, there were found only Fessendcu, Trumbull, 
Fowler, Grimes, Patterson, Ross, Van Winkle, and Henderson, the honorable 
and evcr-to-be-honored few whose intelligence, integrity, and patriotism en- 
abled them to rise above the tempest of howling and vindictive partisans, and 
dare to decide the right, and brave the detractions and misrepresentations of 
the thousand-tongued venal, subsidized party press; and 

Whereas, The hair-breadth escape of the nation from foundering upon 
that, to a free government, dangerous rock, ambition, — one vote only being 
wanting to crush out the last vestige of a representative government, proves 
the necessity of changing the watch in that the darkest hour that can fall 
upon a nation, and placing upon that post other and more reliable guardians 
of the liberties of the people, — guardians who can have no interest other than 
in common with all worthy citizens, and that the supremacy of the right and 
suppression of wrong ; — therefore, 

Resolved, That it be established as one of the fundamental principles of the 
Democratic party, that the Constitution of the United States ought to be 
amended by striking out all of that paragraph of Article one (1), Section (3) 
three, of the Constitution, that reads as follows : ''The Senate shall have the 
sole power to try all impeachments; when sitting for that purpose they shall 
be on oath or affirmation. When the President of the United States is tried 
the Chief-Justice shall preside, and no person shall be convicted without the 
concurrence of two-thirds of the members present;" and inserting an 
amendment to Article three (3), Section two (2), by vesting in the Judiciary 
the sole right to try all impeachments, and creating a Court therefor, to con- 
sist of the Chief-Justice of the United States, who shall be the presiding 
otliccr, and decide all questions of admissibility of evidence, subject to an 
appeal to the bod}' of the Court in form as they may determine, except when 
the Chief-Justice is himself on trial, in which case the Court shall designate 
one of the Circuit Judges to act as presiding officer. The Circuit Judges of 
the United States and the Chief-Justices of the Supreme Courts of each of 
the States of the United States that ever have been recognized as States 
composing the great republic of the United States; Provide*!, That the said 
Court may consist of any number of said Judges not less than two-thirds of 
those entitled to sit therein; And provided further, That no conviction shall 
be had unless upon the concurrence of two-thirds of all the members entitled 
to sit in judgment in said Court, and that no member of said Court shall be 
entitled to vote upon any question of impeachment, duriug the trial of which 
he shall not have attended and listened to the evidence as offered by the par- 
ties, nor in a case in which he shall have formed or expressed an unqualified 
opinion of the guilt or innocence of the party accused, or to which he shall 
be a party defendant ; — or, by some other detail, to so amend the Constitution 
as to separate all judicial functions from the political and law-making power. 

Mr. A. T. Whittlesey, of Indiana. — I move that this Convention do now 
adjourn. 

Mr. Erastus Buooks, of New York. — In behalf of the New York delegation, 
as well as in behalf of the city of New York, I rise to make a privileged motion, 
and that is, to reconsider the motion which was adopted some time ago, that 
this Convention reconvene at seven o'clock this evening. Warm as it is in this 
inid-day weather, when the gas is lighted in this hall the atmosphere here 
will be still more oppressive. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 19 

Mr. A. T. Whittlesey, of Indiana. — I rise to a point of order. A motion 
to adjourn was made. I made it myself, and I have not withdrawn it. 
The motion to adjourn was lost. 

Mr. Brooks. — I will say, sir, that we are at the close of the week, and that 
to-morrow is the Sabbath. This being the national anniversary, the city of 
New York has made great preparations for a proper celebration of the day, at 
its close; and I hope that the display of fireworks which has been prepared for 
this evening will be attended by a large number of our fellow-citizens of other 
States who are in the city. I trust that the resolution for meeting this evening 
may be reconsidered, and that we reconvene in this place on Monday next, at 
ten o'clock, to complete our deliberations. I therefore make that motion. 

Mr. Bradford. — I trust that the motion will be adopted as a matter of 
courtesy to the citizens of New York. 

Mr. McClelland, of Michigan. — Mr. Chairman, there are many of us who 
have come from a great distance to attend this Convention, and have come 
because of the great importance of the occasion. "We are anxious to com- 
plete our labors and to return to our homes, and that anxiety compels us to 
resist this motion, inasmuch as we believe that we cau effect our organization 
to-day, and come in on Monday, and on Monday or Tuesday, in all probabil- 
ity, gloriously close the proceedings of this Convention. I therefore move 
to lay the motion to reconsider on the table. 

The motion to table did not prevail. 

Mr. Brooks, of New York, moved the previous question on the 
motion to reconsider. 

The previous question was ordered, and the motion of Mr. Brooks 
to reconsider prevailed. 

Mr. Brooks, of New York. — Mr. Chairman, I move that when this Con- 
vention adjourn, it adjourn to meet at ten o'clock on Monday morning. (Ap- 
plause.) 

The motion prevailed. 

Mr. McLean, of Ohio, offered the following, — 

Resolved, That the alternates to this Convention, the editors present, and 
the delegates to the Soldiers' and Sailors' Convention, be invited to seats in 
the hall during the session of the Convention. 

The resolution was adopted. 

Mr. Faulkner, of New York. — It has been ordered by this Convention, 
as I understand it, that the Declaration of Independence shall be read this 
evening. If, sir, this Convention shall adjourn until Monday, we shall not be 
able to have that resolution carried into effect. I am unwilling, after this 
Convention has made a point of the reading of the Declaration of Independence 
before this body, to have it omitted. (Applause.) I move you, sir, that the 
Secretary be instructed to read the Declaration of Independence now. 

The motion prevailed. 

A Delegate. — Is there any military commander here who is likely to arrest 
the Secretary for disloyalty for reading the Declaration of Independence ? 

The Chairman. — I suppose no such person exists in the Empire State. 



20 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

The Secretary then read the Declaration of Independence, which 
•was received with cheers. 

On motion the Convention then adjourned till Monday at ten 
o'clock, A. H. 

SECOND DAY. 

Jnly 6, 1868. 
The Convention was called to order by Hon. II. L. Palmer, the tem- 
porary President, at 10i o'clock. 

The Chairman. — Gentlemen of the Convention, I have the pleasure of 
introducing to you Rev. William Quixx, of New York, who will open our 
proceedings with prayer. 

Prayer* 

Rev. Mr. Quixx then offered the following prayer, — 

O, Almighty and Eternal Cod, Creator of heaven and earth, and of all things 
therein, who art infinite knowledge and Infinite wisdom, and by whom just 
laws are administered, assist those in high authority on earth, that whole- 
some laws may be enacted, and that they may be administered with clemency 
and mercy, restraining vice, encouraging the practice of good works. We 
pray Thee, also, Almighty God, that our brethren and fellow-citizens through- 
out the United states may be blessed in the knowledge and sanctified in the 
observance of Thy holy law; that they may be united together more and 
more in union and in the enjoyment of that peace winch the world cannot 
give; and that, after enjoying the things of this life, they may become partak- 
ers of joys that are eternal. We pray Thee, also, O Cod, for those wdio are 
now here assembled in Convention from the different and most remote parts 
of our country, that their deliberations may be conducted In the spirit of 
harmony, of peace, of charity, and may have reference chiefly to the public 
good and well-being of society, — tothe peace, and happiness, and prosperity 
of our beloved land. We pray Thee, also, Almighty God, that these. Thy chil- 
dren, who are now assembled, whilst devoting their best faculties to these 
great and exalted interests, may not be unmindful of Thy presence or of the 
high responsibilities that they owe Thee. These, O Almighty God, and other 
precious gifts and blessings, we pray thee to shower down upon us this day, 
and always through the merits of Thy beloved Son, our Lord and Saviour, 
Jesus Christ, who reigheth with Thee in the unity of the Holy Ghost, world 
without end. 

The Chairman announced the next business in order to be the 
reading of the journal of Saturday's proceedings. 

Mr. Tildkx. of New York. — To expedite the business of the Convention, I 
move that the reading of the journal be dispensed with. 

The motion prevailed. 

Mr. Eicn.vRDSOx, of Illinois. — I hold in my hand a communication from a 
distinguished citizen of Illinois, which I desire to have referred to the Com- 
mittee on Resolutions. 

It was so referred. 

Mr. G. W. Morgan, of Ohio. — I move that the courtesies of this Convention 
be extended to the members of the National Workingmen's Association, and 
that they be invited to accept seats on this floor. 

The motion prevailed. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 



21 



The Permanent Organization. 

Mr. Clt.mer, of Pennsylvania, from the Committee on Organization, 
submitted the following report of officers of the Convention, — 

jdfor |)rcsii)cnt. 
Hon. HORATIO SEYMOUR, of New York. 
(for Vicc-prcsibtnts anb jgrcrdarics. 
Vice-President. Secretary. 



Reuben Chapman. 
B. D. Turner. 
A. H. Rose. 
Henry A. Mitchell. 
George W. Cumniin3 
Thomas Randall. 
A. R. Wright. 

D. M. Woodson. 
James A. Cravens. 
Wm. McClintock. 
Andrew J. Mead. 
Lucius Desha. 
Louis St. Martin. 
Isaac Reid. 
Peter Harvey. 
A. N. Hart. 
George R. Dennis 

E. C. Walthall. 
Winthrop Young. 



ALABAMA. 

ARKANSAS. 

CALIFORNIA. 

CONNECTICUT 

DELAWARE. 

FLORIDA. 

GEORGIA. 

ILLINOIS. 

INDIANA. 

IOWA. 

KANSAS. 

KENTUCKY. 

LOUISIANA. 

MAINE. 

MASSACHUSETTS 

MICHIGAN. 

MARYLAND. 

MISSISSIPPI 

MINNESOTA. 



William M. Lowe. 
John W. Wright. 
M. G. Gillette. 
George D. Hastings. 
Custis W. Wright. 
C. H. Smith. 
William A. Reid. 
W. T. Dowdell. 
W. R. Bowes. 
P. H. Bousquet. 
Isaac Sharp. 
Hart Gibson. 
J. H. Kennard. 
J. A. Linscott. 
Charles G. Clark. 
Frederick V. Smith. 
Outerbridge Horsey. 
Felix Labauve. 
Isaac Staples. 



22 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

Vice-President. Secretary. 

MISSOURI. 
Thomas L. Price. A. J. Reid. 

NEBRASKA. 

George N. Crawford. Peter Smith. 

NEVADA. 

D. E. Buell. George II. Willard. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

George II. Pierce. Albert R. Ilatch. 

NEW JERSEY. 
Francis S. Lathrop. Charles E. Ilendrickson. 

NEW YORK. 

Wm. M. Tweed. Henry A. Richmond. * 

NORTH CAROLINA. 
Bedford Brown. R. B. Haywood. 

OHIO. 

Edson B. Olds. John Hamilton. 

OREGON. 

E. L. Bristow. A. D. Fitch. 

PENNSYLVANIA. 
John L. Dawson. W. M. Reilly. 

RHODE ISLAND. 
Amasa Spraguo. E. B. Bronson. 

SOUTH CAROLINA. 
B. F. Perry. William S. Mullins. 

TENNESSEE. 
A. 0. P. Nicholson. Joseph H. Thompson. 

TEXAS. 

Ashbell Smith. D. A. Veitch. 

VERMONT. 
Henry Keyes. George H. Simmons. 

VIRGINIA. 

Robert Y. Conrad. William D. Coleman. 

WEST VIRGINIA. 
Joseph W. Gallaher. Carlos A. Sperry. 

WISCONSIN. 
Nelson Dowey. ' G. T. Thorn. 

For Reading Secretaries. 

E. 0. Perrin, of New York. 
Moses M. Strong, of Wisconsin. 
V. A. Gaskill, of Georgia. 

F. M. Hutchinson, of Pennsylvania. 
Robert P. Tansey, of Illinois. 

For Sergeant-at-Arms. 
Edward A. Moore, of New York. 

The Committee recommend that the rules and regulations of the National 
Democratic Convention of 1SG1 be adopted by this Convention for the gov- 
ernment of its proceedings. 

W. R. MORRISON, Secretary. HIESTER CLYMER, Chairman. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 23 

At the reading of Governor Seymour's name, the Convention rose 
and gave cheer after cheer. 

Geueral McCook, of Ohio. — I move the acceptance of the report and the 
discharge of the committee. 

Mr. White, of Maryland. — I desire to ask the chairman of the committee 
Whether the adoption of their report will require for the nomination of the 
candidates for President and Vice-President two-thirds of all the votes in the 
Electoral College, or whether two-thirds of the votes cast in this Convention 
will be sufficient to nominate the candidates? The reason I make this inter- 
rogatory is this : I observed, on Saturday last, that some of the States repre- 
sented on this floor cast no votes on the questions which arose in our 
temporary organization. When we come to vote for candidates for Presi- 
dent and Vice-President, the same States may withhold their votes, and 
consequently it will take a much larger vote to make two-thirds of the votes 
of the Electoral College, than if the rule applied only to the votes cast in this 
Convention. In 1S32, the rule was, that it required two-thirds of the votes 
cast in the Convention ; but, if I remember correctly, at Charleston the rule 
was qualified so as to require two-thirds of all the votes cast in the Electoral 
College. I want to know, therefore, so that we can vote intelligently, 
whether, if we adopt in their entirety the rules of the Chicago Convention in 
1864, the candidates must receive two-thirds of the Electoral vote, or only- 
two thirds of the votes cast in the Convention? 

The Chairman. — The Chair is of opiuion that the merits of the report are 
not now under consideration. The question is whether the report shall be 
accepted and the committee discharged. 

The question was put on accepting the report, and discharging the 
committee, and it prevailed. 

The Chairman announced the question to be upon the adoption of 
the report of the Committee on Organization. 

A Delegate from Wisconsin. —Before the vote is taken, I desire to say 
that we can see nothing and hear nothing. Will the Chair have the goodness 
to request that everybody be kept in their seats? 

The Chairman. — The Chair will direct the Sergeant-at-Arms to see that 
the aisles be kept clear, that the members of the Convention remain in their 
seats, and that order is preserved. 

The question w r as put on the adoption of the report of the Com- 
mittee on Organization, and it was declared carried. 

Mr. H. C. Murphy, of New York. — I am requested by the Committee on 
Resolutions to ask permission of this body to sit during its meetings. 

A Delegate. —I move that the Committee on Resolutions have leave to sit 
during the session of the Convention. 

The motion prevailed. 

The Chairman appointed Governor Bigler, of Pennsylvania, and Gov- 
ernor Hammond of South Carolina, a Committee to escort Governor 
Seymour, the permanent President of the Convention, to the chair. 

The committee, amid great applause, performed the duty. 



24 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

The Chairman'. — I introduce to you the President-elect, Hon. Horatio 
Seymour, of New York. 

Governor Seymour, upon reaching the platform, iu company with 
the gentlemen appointed to conduct him to the chair, was received 
with the wildest enthusiasm. The whole Convention rose, and greeted 
him with long-continued cheering and waving of handkerchiefs. 
The spectators in the galleries, also, and the ladies at the sides of 
the platform, manifested their enthusiasm. 

Governor Seymour then came forward, and, when quiet was 
restored, spoke as follows, — 

Speech of Hon. Horatio Seymour. 

Gentlemen of the Convention, — I thank you for the honor you have 
done me in making ine yoar presiding officer. (Cheers.) Tins Convention 
is made up of a large number of delegates from all parts of our broad land. 
To a great degree we are strangers to each other, and view the subjects 
which agitate our country from different stand-points. We cannot, at once, 
learn each other's modes of thought, or grasp all the facts which bear upon 
the minds of others. Yet our session must be brief, and we are forced to act 
without delay upon questions of an exciting character and of deep import to 
our country. (Applause.) To maintain order, to restrain all exhibitions of 
passion, to drive out of our minds all unkind suspicions is, at this time, a 
great duty. (Cheers.) I rely upon your sense of this duty, and not upon my 
own ability, to sustain me in the station in which I am placed by your kind 
partiality. We never met under greater responsibilities than those which 
now weigh upou us. (Applause.) It is not a mere party triumph which we 
seek. We are trying to save our country from the dangers which overhang 
it. (Cheers.) We wish to lift off the perplexities and the shackles which, 
in the shape of bad laws and of crushing taxation, uow paralyze the business 
and labor of our land. (Loud cheers.) We hope, too, that Ave can give 
order, prosperity, and happiness to those sections of our country which 
sull'er so deeply to-day in their homes and in all the fields of their industry 
from the unhappy events of the last eight years. I trust that our actions 
will show that we are governed by an earnest purpose to help all classes of 
our citizens. Avoiding harsh invectives against men, we should keep the 
public mind fixed upon the questions which must now be met and solved. 
(Cheers.) Let us leave the past to the calm judgment of the future and con- 
front the perils of the day. (Cheers.) We are forced to meet the assertions 
of the resolutions put forth by the late Republican Convention. I aver there 
is not in this body one man who has it in his heart to excite so much of angry 
feeling against the Republican party, as must be stirred up in the minds of 
those who read these declarations in the light of recent events, and in view 
of the condition of our country. (Applause.) In the first place, they con- 
gratulate the perplexed man of business, the burdened tax-payer, the laborer 
whose hours of toil are lengthened out by the growing cost of the neces- 
saries of life, upon the success of that reconstruction policy which has 
brought all these evils upon them by the cost of its military despotism, and 
the corruption of its bureau agencies. In one resolution they " denounce all 
forms of repudiation as a national crime." Then why did they put upou the 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTIOX. 25 

statute books of. the nation the laws which invite the citizens who borrow 
coin to force their creditor to take debased paper, and thus wrong him of a 
large share of his claim in violation of the most solemn compact? (Cheers.) 
If repudiation is a national crime, is it no crime to invite all the citizens of 
this country thus to repudiate their individual promises? (Applause.) Was 
it not a crime to force the creditors of this and other States to take a cur- 
rency at times worth no more than forty cents on the dollar, in repayment for 
the sterling coin they gave to build roads and canals which yield such ample 
returns of wealth and prosperity? (Applause.) Again they say, "It is due 
to the laborer of the nation that taxation should be equalized." Then why did 
they make taxation unequal? Beyond the injustice of making one class of 
citizens pay for another their share of the cost of schools, of roads, of the 
local laws which protect their lives and property, it was an unwise and hurt- 
ful thing. (Cheers.) It sunk the credit of the country, as unusual terms 
are always hurtful to the credit of the borrower. They also declare, " The 
best policy to diminish our burden of debt is to improve our credit, that capitalists 
icill seek to loan us money at lower rates of interest than we now pay, and ice 
must continue to pay, so long as repudiation, partial or total, open or covert, is 
threatened or suspected." Then why have they used full five hundred millions 
of the taxes drawn from the people of this country to uphold a despotic mili- 
tary authority, and to crush out the life of the States, when, if this money 
had been used to pay our debts, capitalists would now seek to lend us money 
at lower rates of interest ? (Cheers.) But for this " covert repudiation " our 
national credit would not be tainted in the markets of the world. Again, 
they declare, " Of all who were faithful in the trials of the late war, there 
were none entitled to more especial honor than the brave soldiers and sea- 
men who endured the hardships of campaign and cruise, and imperilled their 
lives in the service of the country; the bounties and pensions provided by 
the laws of these brave defenders of the nation are obligations never to be 
forgotten ; the widows and orphans of the gallant dead are the wards of the 
people, — a sacred legacy bequeathed to the nation's protecting care. How 
have these sacred duties been performed? They pay to the maimed man, to 
the widow, or the orphau," a currency which they have sunk one-quarter below 
its rightful value by their policy of hate, of waste, and of military despot- 
ism. The pittance paid to the wounded soldiers is pinched down twenty- 
five per cent, below the value of that coin which he had a right to expect. 
(Loud cheering.) Is there no covert repudiation in this? (Applause.) 
Again they say, " Foreign immigration, which has added so much to the wealth, 
development, and resources and increase of power of this Republic, the asylum 
of the oppressed of all nations, should be fostered and encouraged by a liberal 
and just policy. " Is this foreign immigration fostered by a policy which, in 
cruel mockery of laws just passed, declaring eight hours to be a legal day's 
labor, by the cost of government and of swarms of officials, so swells the 
costs of living that men must toil on to meet the exactions? (Cheers.) 
The time was when we could not only invite the European to share with us 
the material blessings of our great country; but more than that, — we could 
tell those who fled from oppression that we lived under a government of laws 
administered by the Judiciary, which kept the bayonet and the sword in due 
subordination. (Cheers.) We could point to a written constitution which 
not only marked out the powers of government, but with anxious care 



26 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

secured to the humblest men the rights of property, of persons, and of con- 
science. Is immigration encouraged by trampling that Constitution in the 
dust; treating it with contempt; shackling the Judiciary; insulting the Exec- 
utive, and giving all the world to understand that the great guaranties 
of political and social rights are destroyed? (Great applause.) But the 
crowning indictment against the follies and crimes of those in power is in 
these words : " That we recognize the great principles laid down in the im- 
mortal Declaration of Independence as the true foundation of Democratic 
government, and we hail with gladness every effort towards making these 
principles a living reality on every inch of American soil." If within the 
limits of ten States of tfois Union, an American citizen, stung by a sense of 
his wrongs, should publicly and truthfully denounce the men in power lie- 
cause, in the very language of this Declaration of Independence, " They have 
erected a multitude of new offices, and sent forth sioarms of officers to harass our 
people and eat out their substance," he would, in all human probability, be 
dragged to a prison. Or if, in the indignant language of our fathers, he 
should exclaim, " They have affected to render the military independent of, and 
superior to, the civil power; they have abolished the free system of English laios, 
and established herein an arbitrary government" — for the offence of asserting 
these principles he would be tried and punished by a military tribunal. 
(Great cheering.) Having declared that the principles of the Declaration of 
Independence should be made a " living reality on every inch of American soil," 
they put in nomination a military chieftain who stands at the head of that 
system of despotisms that crushes beneath its feet the greatest principles of 
the Declaration of Independence. (Cheers.) To-day, in some States, it is 
held by military orders to be a crime to speak out the indignation and con- 
tempt which burn within the bosoms of patriotic men. If to-morrow a mili- 
tary order should be put forth in that State where the ashes of Washington 
are entombed, that it should be an offence to declare that the military should 
ever be subordinate to the civil authority, — to speak out the sentiment that 
it was a disgrace to our country to let the hordes of officials eat up the sub- 
stance of the people, — he who uttered these words would be dragged to 
prison from the very grave where lie the remains of the author of the Decla- 
ration of Independence — (Loud cheers) — from this outrage there could be 
no appeal to the courts ; aud the Republican candidate for the presidency has 
accepted a position which makes the rights and liberties of a large share of 
our people dependent upon his will. (Applause.) In view of these things, 
can there be one man in this Convention who can let a personal ambition, a 
passiou, a prejudice, turn him aside one hair's breadth in his efforts to wipe 
out the wrongs and outrages which disgrace our country? (Cheers.) Can 
there be one man here whose heart is so dead to all that is great and noble in 
patriotism that he will not gladly sacrifice all other things for the sake of his 
country, its liberties, and its greatness ? Can we suffer any prejudices, growing 
out of past differences of opinion, to hinder us from uniting now with all who 
will act with us to save our country? (Cheers.) We meet to-day to see 
what measures can be taken to arrest the dangers which threaten our coun- 
try, and to retrieve it from the evils and burdens resulting from bad govern- 
ment and unwise counsels. I thank God that the strife of arms has ceased, 
and that once more in the great conventions of our party we can call through 
the whole roll of States and And men to answer for each. (Tremendous and 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 27 

continued cheering.) Time and events, in their great cycles, have brought 
us to this spot to renew and invigorate that Constitutional Government 
Which, nearly eighty years ago, was inaugurated in this city. (Loud cheers.) 
It was here that George Washington, the first President, swore to " preserve, 
protect, and defend," the Constitution of these United States. (Cheers.) 
Aud here, this day, we as solemnly pledge ourselves to uphold the rights and 
liberties of the American people. Then, as now, a great war which has 
desolated our land had ceased. Then, as now, there was in every patriotic 
breast a longing for the blessings of a good government, for the protection 
of laws, and for sentiments of fraternal regard aud affection among the in- 
habitants of all the States of this Union. When our government, in 1780, 
was inaugurated in this city, there were glad processions of men aud those 
manifestations of great joy which a people show when they feel that an event 
has happened which is to give lasting blessing to the land. (Cheers.) To- 
day, in this same spirit, this vast assemblage meets, and the streets are 
thronged with men who have come from the utmost borders of our continent. 
They are filled with the hope that we are about, by our actions, and our 
policy, to bring back the blessings of good government. It is among the 
happiest omens which inspirit us now, that those who fought bravely in our 
late civil war are foremost in their demands that there shall be peace in our 
land. The passions of hate and malice may linger in meaner breasts, but we 
find ourselves upheld in our generous purposes by those who showed true 
courage aud manhood on the field of battle. (Cheers.) In the spirit, then, 
of George Washington, and of the patriots of the Revolution, let us take the 
steps to reinaugurate our government, to start it ouce again on its course to 
greatness and prosperity. (Loud cheers.) May Almighty God give us the 
wisdom to carry out our purposes, to give to every State of our Uuion the 
blessings of peace, good order, and fraternal affection! 

Mr. Seymour closed amid long-continued and tremendous cheer- 
ing. 

Mr. George W. Woodward, of Pennsylvania. — I present a written com- 
munication from a highly respectable citizen of Peuns} T lvania, aud ask that it 
may be referred to the Committee on Platform, without reading. 

The communication was referred as requested. 

At the request of the President the Vice-Presidents elect then took 
seats on the platform. 

Mr. Isaac E. Hiester, of Pennsylvania. — I beg to have referred to the 
Committee on Resolutions the resolutions of the State Conventions of Penn- 
sylvania and Michigan. 

Agreed to. 

Mr. Buooks, of New York, offered the following resolutions, — 

Resolutions adopted at a Special Council of the National 
Labor Union, assembled at New York, July 2, 1868. 

Whereas, The right to labor and its reward is self-evident ; and whereas 
the excess or want of work is a fruitful source of ignorance, disease, and 
crime ; and whereas the tendency of legislation and monopoly is to restrict 



28 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

the freedom, cripple the energies, and purloin the earnings of industry; 
therefore, 

Besolved, That the producing classes, agricultural, mining, mechanical, 
intellectual and moral, are the most important portion of all communities; 
and that distributors, financiers, and statesmen, together with their aids, 
civil and military, are of secondary consequence, being simply created of the 
former to disseminate wealth, maintain order, conserve justice, and keep in- 
tact the integrity of the nation. 

Besolved, That the national honor must be preserved by paying its debts in 
good faith, and that every debt of the government, not specifically contracted 
to be paid in gold, should be paid in the lawful currency of the United States; 
that the bonds, when redeemable, should be paid in legal-tender notes, or ex- 
changed for other bonfls at three per cent., convertible into lawful money, at 
the pleasure of the holder. 

Besolved, That the public interest demands the withdrawal of the circulat- 
ing notes of the national banks, and the substitution of legal-tender Treas- 
ury certificates in their stead. 

Besolved, That we demand equal taxation on every species of property, 
according to its real value. 

Besolved, That no more of the public domain should be granted to any 
corporation, under auy pretext whatever, and the lands not disposed of 
should be withdrawn from the market and granted to actual settlers. 

Besolved, That we return our thanks to the majorities in Congress and in 
such State Legislatures as have, in their wisdom, deemed it right and proper 
to pass the Eight-Hour Law; and we call upon the proper authorities in the 
United States and the States above mentioned to show their respect for the 
same by enforcing its demand. 

Besolved, That the low wages, long hours, and damaging service to which 
multitudes of working girls and women are doomed, destroy health, imperil 
virtue, and are a standing reproach to civilization; that we would urge tliem 
to learn trades, engage in business, join our labor unions, or use any other 
honorable means to persuade or force men to render unto every woman ac- 
cording to her works. 

Beso!w<l, That we urge upon the industrial classes in every Congressional 
and State district, county, city, or town, to press these principles upon the 
public notice, and to support no man for Congress, or any State Legislature, 
or any other ollice of profit or trust, who is not fully pledged to ' their 
support. 

Besolved, That we recommend to the people, throughout the nation, to hold 
mass meetings to ratify the principles of the National Labor Union, adopted 
at Chicago, August, 1807, and herein set forth, and to vote only for those 
candidates who indorse them; and unless these principles are adopted by one 
of the two great parties — we care not which — we advise the National Labor 
Union, at its annual convention, soon to be held in this city, to put in nomi- 
nation an independent labor candidate for the Presidency, and rally the 
masses to his support. 

The President. — I have here a memorial from the Women's Suffrage 
Association, with the request that it be handed to the Committee on Reso- 
lutions. 

Loud cheers, laughter, and cries of " Hear ! Hear ! " " Read ! 
Read ! " 

The President. — I may mention that this document is signed by Miss 
Susan B. Anthony. 

Cries, " Read it ! read it ! " 

The Secretary read the communication as follows, — 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 29 

Women's Suffrage Association of America, } 

37 Park Row, Room 20, > 

New York, July 4, 18G8. ) 

Elizabeth Cady Stanton, 1 

Mrs. Horace Greeley, lri™,+.«.i n~ m ™,n-^ 

S.san B. Anthony, f Central Committee. 

Abby Hopper Gibbons, J 

To the President and Members of the National Democratic Convention : 

Gentlemen, — I address you by letter to ask the privilege of appearing be- 
fore yon, during the sittings oY this Convention, to demand the enfranchise- 
ment of the women of America; the only class of cUizens wholly unrepre- 
sented in the government; the only class (not guilty of crime) taxed without 
representation, tried without a jury of their peers, governed without their 
consent. And yet in this class are fouud many of your most noble, virtuous, 
law-abiding citizens, who possess all the requisite qualifications of voters. 
Women have property and education. We are not " idiots, lunatics, paupers, 
criminals, rebels," nor do we "bet on elections." We lack, according to 
your constitutions, but one qualification — that of sex — which is insur- 
mountable (Laughter), and therefore equivalent to a deprivation of suffrage; 
in other words, the "tyranny of taxation without representation." We 
desire to lay before you this violation of the great fundamental principles of 
our government for your serious consideration, knowing that minorities can 
be moved by principles as majorities are only by votes. Hence we look to 
you for the initiative step in the redress of our grievances. The party in 
power have not only failed to heed our innumerable petitions, asking the 
right of suffrage, poured into Congress and State Legislatures, but they have 
submitted a proposition to the several States to insert the word " male" in 
the Federal Constitution, where it never has beeu, and thereby put up a new 
barrier against the enfranchisement of women. This fresh insult to the 
women of the republic, who so bravely shared the dangers and sacrifices of 
the late war, has roused us to more earnest and persistent efforts to secure 
those rights, privileges, and immunities which belong to every citizen under 
government. As you hold the Constitution of the Fathers to be a sacred 
legacy to us and to our children forever, we ask you to save it from this 
desecration, which deprives one-half our citizens of the right of representa- 
tion in the government. Over this base proposition the nation has stood 
silent and indifferent. While the dominant party have, with one hand, lifted 
up two millions black men and crowned them with the honor and dignity of 
citizenship, with the other they have dethroned fifteeu million white women, — 
their own mothers and sisters, their own wives and daughters, — and cast 
them under the heel of the lowest order of manhood. We appeal to you, 
not only because you, being in a minority, are in a position to cousidcr 
principles, but because you have been the party heretofore to extend the 
suffrage. It was the Democratic party that fought most valiantly for the re- 
moval of the " property qualification" from all white men, and thereby placed 
the poorest ditch-digger on a political level with the proudest millionnaire. 
This one act of justice to working-men has perpetuated your power, with 
but few interruptions, from that time until the war. And now 3011 have an 
opportunity to confer a similar boon on the women of the country, and thus 
possess yourselves of a new talisman that will ensure and perpetuate your 
political power for decades to come. 

While the first and highest motive we would urge on you is the recognition 
in all your action of the great principles of justice and equality that are the 
foundation of a Republican government, it is not unworthy to remind you 
that the party that takes this onward step will reap its just reward. It needs 
but little observation to see that the tide of progress in all countries is set- 
ting toward the enfranchisement of women, and that this advance step in 
civilization is destined to be taken in our day. We conjure you, then, to 
turn from the dead' questions of the past to the vital issues of the hour. The 



30 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

brute form of slavery ended with the war. The black man is a soldier and a 
citizen. He holds the bullet and the ballot in his own right hand. Consider 
his case settled. Those weapons of defence and self-protection can never lie 
wrenched from him. Yours the responsibility now to see that no new chains 
be forged by bondholders and monopolists for enslaving the labor of the 
country. The late war, seemingly in the interest of slavery, was fought by 
unseen hands for the larger liberties of the whole people. It was not a war 
between North and South, for the principle of class and caste knows neither 
latitude or longitude. It was a war of ideas — of Aristocracy and Democ- 
racy — of capital and labor — the same that has convulsed the race through 
the ages, and will continue to convulse future generations until justice and 
equality shall reign upon the earth. I desire, therefore, an opportunity to 
Urge on this Convention, the wisdom of basing its platform on universal suf- 
frage, as well as universal amnesty, from Maine to California, and thus to 
take the first step toward a peaceful and permanent reconstruction. 
In behalf of the Woman's Suffrage Association of America. 

Respectfully yours, Susan B. Anthony. 

Applause greeted various portions of the document. 

It was referred to the Committee on Credentials. 

Mr. Nelson, of Tennessee, offered the following, — 

Beaolved, That the Committee appointed by the National Convention of the 
ninth of June last, to present to this Convention a memorial of the grievances 
of Tennessee under Radical rule, be admitted to seats in this Convention, and 
permitted to present said report. 

Which was adopted. 

Report of the Committee on Credentials, 

Mr. "Wayne Griswold, Chairman of the Committee on Credentials, 
presented the following, which was read, — 

To the Chairman of the National Democratic Convention : 

Your Committee on Credentials beg leave to report, — that we have ex- 
amined the credentials of every State in the Union, and we find that each 
has the full number of delegates to which it is entitled under the call of 
the National Democratic Executive Committee. "While we report the follow- 
ing as the names of the delegates from the respective States, your Com- 
mittee rejoice that this Convention presents to the nation and to the world 
a full and complete representation from every State in the American Union. 
(Loud cheering.) 
They also report the following resolution, — 

Beaolved, That the Committee on Credentials recommend that three dele- 
gates from each Territory, and four from the District of Columbia, be ad- 
mitted to seats on the floor of this Convention, without the privilege of 
voting in its proceedings. 



c. 


C 


Langdon, 


R. 


G 


. Scott, Jr. 


J. 


T. 


Holtzclaw, 


w 


.C 


. ( >ates. 


w 


. IF 


. Barnes, 


M. 


J. 


Bulger. 


P. 


0. 


I 
Thweat, 


B. 


I), 


, Turner, 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONTENTION. 31 

List of Delegates. 

ALABAMA 
DELEGATES AT LARGE. 

Reuben Chapman, Lewis E. Parsons, 

John A. Winston, James II. Clauton. 

DISTRICT DELEGATES. 

4. Samuel Rnfflu, 
John J. Jolly. 

5. Win. M. Lowe, 
James L: Sheffield. 

6. R. 0. Pickett, 
Thomas J. McCellan. 

ARKANSAS. 

^LEGATES AT LARGE. 

A. H. Garland, 
E. C. Boudinot. 

DISTRICT DELEGATES. 

1. Robert Smith, 3. J. S. Dunham 
Jacob Frolich. R. C. Davis. 

2. John W. Wright, 
John M. Harrell. 

CALIFORNIA. 

DELEGATE AT LARGE. 

Thomas Hays (deceased). M. G. Gillette. 

DISTRICT DELEGATES. 

1. R. C. Page, 3. E. Steele, 

A. Jacoby, Charles S. Fairfax, 

Joseph Roberts. W. Woodward. 

2. JohnBigler, 

Richard Heath, 

A. H. Rose. 

CONNECTICUT. 

DELEGATES AT LARGE. 

Wm. W. Eaton, Benjamin Stark, 

Tilton E. Doolittle, James H. Hoyt. 

DISTRICT DELEGATES. 

1. Henry A. Mitchell, 3. James A. Hovey, 
Geo. D. Hastings. Marvin H. Sanger. 

2. John Kendrick, 4. Matthew Bulkley, 
Isaac Arnold. Donald D. Warner. 

COLORADO. 

DELEGATES AT LARGE. 

Hugh Butler, Capt. Craig, 

H. B. Morse, T. J. Campbell, 

M. Anker, G. Blayton. 

DELAWARE. 

James A. Bayard, Thos. B. Bradford, 

Charles Beasten, James Ponder, 

George W. Cummins, Curtis W. Wright. 



32 



OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. 



J. D. Hoover, 
Charles Allon, 
Jas. G. Berret, 
T. A. Tol.son, 
Esau Pickrell, 

F. R. Cotton, 
Wilkinson Call, 
J. P. Sanderson, 
C. E. Dyke, 
W. D. Barnes, 
C. II. Smith, 
J. C. McLean, 
II. Wright, 
Jas. McKay, 
W. II. Robinson, 
E. M. L'Engie, 



B. T. Swart, 
FLORIDA 



J. Peeber, 
GEORGIA. 

DELEGATES AT LARGE 



Wm. Flinn, 
R. S. Davis, 
C. Wendell, 
Louis Schade, 
Juo. B. Blake. 

Thos. Randall, . 
S. Fairbanks, 
Chas. Davis, 
S. H. Owens, 
A. F. Smith, 
A. Hewling, 
J. B. Brown, 
E. C. Love, 
R. L.- Campbell, 
W. W. Van Ness, 
J. J. Williams. 



A. H. Colquitt, 
Geo. Barnes, 



H. S. Fitch, 
J. B. Gordon. 



DISTRICT DELEGATES. 



1. W. T. Thompson, 
P. C. Pendleton. 

2. A. II. Hood, 
C. W. Styles. 

3. II. Buchanan, 
J. L. Mustin. 

7. D. P. Hill, 



4. W. A. Reid, 
C. Pceples. 
6. A. R. Wright, 
E. II. Pottle. 
6. Phil. R. Simmons, 

E. Steadmau. 
L. Tumlin. 
ILLINOIS. 

DELEGATES AT LARGE. 

W. J. Allen, W. R. Morrison, 

George W. Shutt, W. T. Dowdall, 

W. F. Story, W. A. Richardson. 

DISTRICT DELEGATES. 



1. Thomas A. Hoyne, 
W. C. Goudy. 

2. R. S. Malony, 

A. M. Harrington. 

3. William P. Malburn, 
Bernard II. Truesdale. 

4. Charles Buford, 
George Edmunds. 

5. W. II. O'Brien, 
James S. Eckles. 

6. Charles E. Boyer, 
J. II. McCounell. 



7. John Donlon, 
Thomas Brewer. 

8. Dr. R. B. M. Wilson, 
Charles A. Keyes. 

9. Henry L. Bryant, 
Lyman Lacy. 

10. Edward Y. Rice, 
D. M. Woodson. 

11. Samuel K. Casey, 
Joseph Cooper. 

12. Timothy Grearye, 
W. A. J. Sparks. 



13. William II. Green, George W. Wail. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 



33 



INDIANA. 

DELEGATES AT LARGE. 

D. W. Voorhies, Graham V. Fitch, 

J. E. McDonald, Wm. E. Niblack. 

DISTRICT DELEGATES. 



1. A. T. Whittlesey, 
W. S. Turner. 

2. Jas. A. Cravens, 
David Huffstetter. 

3. H. W. Harrington, 
W. T. Pate. 

4. Lafe Devlin, 
John W. Carleton. 

5. W. H. Talbott, 
D. G. Vawter. 

6. Samuel H. Buskirk, 
C. G. Patterson. 



7. W. D. Manson, 
Harris Reynolds. 

8. It. P. Effluger, 
J. M. Dickson. 

9. E. Sturgis, 
Adam Wolf. 

10. Jas. R. Slack, 
S. W. Sprott. 

11. T. J. Merrifield, 
C H. Reeve. 



IOWA. 



DELEGATES AT LARGE. 



A. C. Dodge, 
John H. O'Neil, 



D. O. Finch, 
George H. Parker. 



DISTRICT DELEGATES. 



1. John Rhinehart, 
Patrick Gibbon. 

2. T. S. Bardwell, 
W. E. Brennan. 

3. William McCliutock, 
Ray B. Griffin. 



KANSAS. 



George W. Glick, 
Andrew J. Mead, 
Wilson Shannon, Jr., 



Samuel H. Fairall, 

P. H. Bousquett. 

J. D. Test, 

J. N. Udell. 

H. E. J. Boardraan, 

E. B. Holbrook. 



Charles W. Blair, 
Isaac Sharp, 
Thomas P. Fenlon. 



KENTUCKY. 

DELEGATES AT LARGE. 



R. H. Stanton, 
J. A. Spalding, 



William Preston, 
J. G. Carlyle. 



DISTRICT DELEGATES. 



3. H. 
A. 

4. E. 
C 

5. T. 



W. B. Machen, 
J. A. Flournoy. 
Gano Henry, 
C B. Vance. 
, L. Dulam, 
J. Rhea. 

A. Graves, 

B. Mattingly. 
L. Jefferson, 

Littleton Cooke. 
3 



6. Lucius Desha, 
F. A. Boyd. 

7. B. F.Buckner, 
J. Hart Gibson. 

8. Edward Turner, 
James B. McCreary, 

9. Thomas Turner, 
A. L. Martin. 



34 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

LOUISIANA. 
DELEGATES AT LARGE. 

1. J. B. Steadman, 2. Jas McClosky, 

B. F. Jonas. T. A. Carke. 

DISTRICT DELEGATES. 

1. Durant Laponte, 4. J. H. Hardy, 
Louis St. Martin. J. McEnry. 

2. R. L. Gibson, 5. N. D. Coleman, 
James B. Eustis. George W. McCraraio, 

3. J. A. Kennard. W. W. Smalhvood. 

MAINE. 

DELEGATES AT LARGE. 

Richard D. Rice, David R. Hastings, 

Samuel J. Anderson, James C. Madigan. 

DISTRICT DELEGATES. 

1. IraT. Drew, 4. Henry Hudson, 
Sylvauus C. Blanchard. ■ Marcellus Emory. 

2. J. A. Linscott, 6. P. J. Carleton, 
Moses Hi g j: C. Talbot. 

3. James A. Creighton, 
Isaac Reed. 

MARYLAND. 

DELEGATES AT LARGE. 

Richard B. Carmichael, Montgomery Blair, 

George R. Dennis, Charles J. McGwinn. 

DISTRICT DELEGATE. 

1. Hiram McCullough, 4. Andrew I!. Syester, 
Edward Floyd. Outerbridge Horsey. 

2. Stephenson Archer, 5. John D. Bowling, 
Win. Byrnes. Geo. Fred. Maddox. 

3. Wm. Fynkney White, 
Geo. W. Benson. 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

DELEGATES AT LARGE. 

Josiah G. Abbott, Reuben Noble, 

Josiah Bardwell, G. W. Gill. 

DISTRICT DELEGATES. 

1. Edward Merrill, 6. D.W.Lawrence, 

Nicholas Hathaway. George Johnson. 

2. S. B. Thaxter, 7. W. W. Warren, 
Edward Avery, Gardner Prouty. 

3. James M. Keith, 8. George L. Chesbro, 
Michael Doherty. James E. Estabrook. 

4. Peter Harvey, 9. Frank Pratt, 
Thomas Whittemore. L. B. Jaquith. 

5. Charles G. Clark, 10. Abijah W. Springfleld, 
A. O. Moore. John R. Britrgs. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 35 

MICHIGAN. 
DELEGATES AT LARGE. 

John Moore, Robert McClelland, 

Byron G. Stout, Charles E. Stuart. 

DISTRICT DELEGATES. 

1. Win. A. Moore, 4. John F. Godfrey, 
Mich. A. Patterson. John C. Blanchard. 

2. Fred. V. Smith, 5. E. B. Wiuaus, 
Walter G. Beckwith. Seymour Brovvnell. 

3. John L. Butterfield, 6. S. M. Axford, 

A. M. Hart. Clarence E. Eddie. 

MINNESOTA. 

DELEGATES AT LARGE. 

A. G. Chatfleld, W. A. Gorman, 

James J. Green, Winthrop Young. 

DISTRICT DELEGATES. 

1. E. A. McMahon, 2. Isaac Staples, 

George D. Snow. Thos. N. Sheehey. 

MISSISSIPPI. 

DELEGATES AT LARGE. 

W. S. Featherston, W. T. Martin, 

E. C. Walthall, E. M. Yerger. 

DISTRICT DELEGATES. 

1. Orlando Davis, 4. T. A. Marshall, 

F. B. Irby. • E. Barksdale. 

2. R. M. Brown, 5. J. S. Holt, 

S. A. Jonas. T. R. Stockdale. 

3. G. P. M. Turner, 
H. L. Jarnagin. 

MISSOURI. 

DELEGATES AT LARGE. 

Jas. O. Brodhead, Thomas L. Price, 

A. J. P. Garesche, Bernard Schwartz. 

DISTRICT DELEGATES. 

1. Erastus Wells, 5. Jno. F. Phillips, 
Stilson Hutchins. N. M. Givan. 

2. Carl Daenzer, 6. Sam'l L. Sawyer, 
David Murphy. John B. Hale. 

3. Thomas H. Bird, 7. Wm. A. Ridenbaugh, 
J. W. Everson. Charles A. Mansur. 

4. O. S. Fahnestock, 8. John M. Glover, 
Nathan Bray. Thos. B. Reed. 

9. W. D. Hunter, A. J. Reed. 

NEBRASKA. 

G. L. Miller, J. Sterling Morton, 
G. N. Crawford, John Black, 

Chas. F. Porter, Peter Smith. 



36 



OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 



NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

DISTRICT DELEGATES. 

1. Anson S. Marshall, 3. James M. Campbell, 
Albert R. Hatch. John Proctor. 

2. George II. Pierce, 4. Horatio Colony, 
Isaac Adams. II. W. Parker. 

5. John G. Sinclair, E. D. Rand. 

NEW JERSEY. 

DELEGATES AT LARGE. 

Jacob K. Wortendyke, Richard F. Stevens, 

Thomas McKeen, F. D. Latroop. 

DISTRICT DELEGATES. 

1. Samuel Still, 3. Ryneas II. Vechtes, 
Isaac M. Smalley. Miles Ross. 

2. Henry S. Little, 4. David Dodd, 
Chas. ]). Hendrickson. Thomas Kays. 

5. John R. Mullaney, George Peters. 

NEW YORK. 

DELEGATES AT LARGE. 

Horatio Seymour, Samuel J. Tilden, 

Sauford E. Church, Henry C. Murphy. 



DISTRICT 

1. Erastus Brooks, 
John Armstrong. 

2. Jas. 15. Craig, 
Wm. Marshall. 

3. Alex. McCue, 
Jas. Murphy. 

4. Joseph Dowling, 
S. S. Cox. 

5. Win. M. Tweed, 
John Morrissey. 

6. Emanuel 15. Hart, 
Oswald ( ittendorfer. 

7. Chas. G. Cornell, 
August Belmont. 

8. Augustus Schell, 
A. ( hikey Hall. 

9. P. B. Sweeney, 
Edw. Jones. 

10. Collin Talmie, 
Robert Cochran. 

11. Jas. B Decker, 
C. H. Winfield. 

12. Henry A. Tilden, 
Chas. Wheaton. 

13. Jacob Hardenburgh, 
Geo. Beach. 

14. Wm. Cassidy, 
A. A. Hunt. 

15. Moses Warren, 
Emerson E. Davis. 

31. Chas. H. Lee, 



DELEGATES. 

16. Timothy Hovle, 
Ilalsev R. Wing. 

17. Sam'l B. Gordon, 
Darius W. Lawrence. 

18. Cornelius A. Russell, 
Col. Simeon Sainmous. 

19. Luther J. Burdett, 
John P. Hubbard, Jr. 

20. Allen C. Beach, 
Lorenzo Caryl. 

21. Francis Kernan, 
Geo. II. San lord. 

22. Wm. F. Allen, 
Chas. Stebbins, Jr. 

23. Jas. P. Ilaskins, 
John A. Green, Jr. 

24. Elmore P. Ross, 
Chas. L. Lyon. 

25. Joseph L. Lewis, 
Lester B. Faulkner. 

26. Hiram A. Beebe, 
Jeremiah McGuire. 

27. Marshall B. Champlain, 
Dan'l C. Howell. 

28. Geo. W. Miller, 
Henry J. Sickles. 

29. Sherburn B. Piper, 
Henry A. Richmond. 

30. Joseph Warren, 
Wm. Williams. 

Jonas K. Buttou. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 



37 



NEVADA. 



W. G. Monroe, 
George G. Berry, 
D. E. Buel, 



L. P. Drexler, 
John E. Doyle, 
W. M. Seawell. 



NORTH CAROLINA. 

DELEGATES AT LARGE. 

W. N. H. Smith, Win. A. Wright, 

W. L. Cox, Jno. F. Hoke. 

DISTRICT DELEGATES. 

M. W. Ransom, 4. W. J. Green, 



D. M. Carter, 
P. H. Winston. 
R. H. Smith. 
M. E. Manly, 
Geo. Howard. 
Robert Strange, 
N. A. McLean. 



R. B. Haywood. 

Bed. Brown, 

J. M. Leach. 

Z. B. Vance, 

J. M. Long. 

Thos. L. Clingman, 

L. McD. Tate. 



OHIO. 

DELEGATES AT LARGE. 



Geo. W. McCook, 
C. L. Vallandigham, 



John G. Thompson, 
W. W. Armstrong. 



DISTRICT DELEGATES. 



1. Jos. C. Butler, 
J. C. Collins. 

2. Theodore Cook, 
H. C. Lord. 

3. Geo. E. Pugh, 
Wm. G. Gilraore. 

4. John E. Cummins, 
John E. Matchett. 

5. R. R. McKee, 
F. C. LeBlond. 

6. David Tarbill, 
J. M. Trimble. 

7. Jacob Reinhard, 
Geo. W. Morgan. 

8. H. T. Van Fleet, 
W. M. Randall. 

9. Thos. Beer, 
John A. Williams. 

10. John Maidlow, 
J. G. Healey. 

E. L. Bristow, 
N. M. Bell, 
O. Joynt, 



OREGON. 



11. John Hamilton, 
J. W. Collings. 

12. E. B. Olds, 
Wayne Griswold. 

13. Frank H. Hurd, 
Win. Veach. 

14. T. J. Kenney, 
Neal Power. 

15. Hugh J. Jewett, 
Wylie S. Oldham. 

16. William Lawrence, 
Henry Boyles. 

17. Jas. B. Estep, 
Jas. H. Quinn. 

18. Morrison Foster, 
H. H. Dodge. 

19. R. O. Bate, 

D. C. Coleman. 



W. W. Page, 
Judge P. Bruin, 
J. C Avery. 



38 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

PENNSYLVANIA. 

DELEGATES AT LARGE. 

George W. Woodward, James Campbell, 

William Bigler, Isaac E. Heistcr. 

DISTRICT DELEGATES. 

1. Wm. Mc Mull in, 13. Michael Meyler, 
D. M. Naglee. David Lowenberg. 

2. Wm. M. Reilly, 14. David M. Crawford, 
Wm. C. Patterson. Wm. H. Miller. 

3. Henry R. Linderman, 15. John A. Magee, 
John E. Faunce. John Gibson. 

4. Jeremiah McKibbin, 1G. George W. Brewer, 
P. McEntee. John R. Donahue. 

6. Charles M. Hurley, 17. James Burns, 
II. P. Ross. Owen Clark. 

C. B. M. Boyer, 18. George A. Auchenbach, 
John D. Stiles. Wm. Brindle. 

7. John II. Brinton, 19. Byron 1). Hamlin, 
Jackson Lyons. Wm. L. Scott. 

8. Hlester Clymer, 20. Wm. L. Corbett, 
Jeremiah Ilagenman. Gaylord Church. 

9. Win. 1'attou, 21. John L. Dawson, 

A. J. Steinman. James B. Sansora. 

10. Francis W. Haghes, 22. John A. Strain, 
David S. Hammond. John B. Guthrie. 

11. E. W. Hamlin, 23. R. II. Kerr, 
Henry S. Mott. JohnT. Bard. 

12. Jasper B. Stark, 24. A. A. Purman, 
Ralph B. Little. David S. Morris. 

RHODE ISLAND. 
Chas. S. Bradley, Thos. Steere, 

Alfred Anthony, Ed. W. Brunsen, 

Lyman Pierce, William H. Allen, 

Edward Newton, Amasa Sprague. 

SOUTH CAROLINA. 
{Appointed by the April Convention.) delegates at large. 

B. F. Perry, J. A. Inglis, 
James Chesnut, A. P. Aldrich. 

DISTRICT DELEGATES. 

1. W. S. Mullins, 3. J. S. Preston, 
J. B. Kershaw. W. B. Stanley. 

2. C. Tracey, 4. A. Burt, 

W. L. Bouham. W. D. Simpson. 

{Appointed by the June Convention.') delegates at large. 
Wade Hampton, C. M. Furman, 

J. B. Campbell, J. P. Carroll. 

DISTRICT DELEGATES. 

1. A. L. Manning, 3. M. W. Gary, 

R. Dozier. A. D. Frederick. 

2. C. H. Simonton, 4. T. S. Farrow. 
John Hunckel. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 39 

TENNESSEE. 

DELEGATES AT LARGE. 

T. A. R. Nelson, A. G. P. Nicholson, 

N. B. Forrest, Edmuud Cooper. 

DISTRICT DELEGATES. 

1. James White, 5. W. B. Bate, 
W. C Kyle. I. D. Walker. 

2. John Williams, 6. John F. House, 

K. M. Edwards. Dorsay B. Thomas. 

3. P. H. Marbry, 7. Wm. Connor, 
W. J. Bamage. W. T. Caldwell. 

4. H. C. McLaughlin, 8. A. W. Campbell, 
Joseph H. Thompson. J. W. Leftwich. 

TEXAS. 

DELEGATES AT LARGE. 

Horace Boughton, Ashbel Smith, 

Stephen Powers, Gustavus Schleicher. 

DISTRICT DELEGATES. 

1. James M. Burroughs, S. J. D. Giddiugs, 
Daniel A. Veitch. E. J. Gurley. 

2. H. R. Runnels, 4. G. W. Smith, 
George W. Wright. George Ball. 

VERMONT. 

DELEGATES AT LARGE. 

H. B. Smith, Henry Keys, 

Isaac McDaniels, P. S. Benjamin. 

DISTRICT DELEGATES. 

1. E. R. Wright, ' 3. Waldo Brigham, 
George H. Simmons. J. J. Deavitt. 

2. George H. Weeks, 
C. N. Davenport. 

VIRGINIA. 

DELEGATES AT LARGE. 

T. A. Bocock, J. B. Baldwin, 

F. McMullen, F. L. Kemper, 

George Blow, Jr., T. S. Flourney. 

DISTRICT DELEGATES. 

1. B..B. Douglas, 5. R. H. Glass, 

H. S. Neal. William Martin. 

2. John Goode, 6. J. C. Southall, 
John R. Kilby. Samuel W. Coffman. 

3. James A. Barbour, 7. John R. Tucker, 
Robert Ould. Ro. Y. Conrad. 

4. Robert Ridgway, 8. Joseph Kent, 
Thomas F. Goode. William B. Aston. 



40 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

WEST VIRGINIA. 

DELEGATES AT LARGE. 

John Hall, Henry S. Walker, 

John W. Kennedy, John J. DavLs. 

DISTRICT DELEGATES. 

1. J. W. Gallaher, 2. H. G. Davis, 

J. N. Camden. J, A. F. Martin. 

3. C. A. Sperry, B. H. Smith. 
WISCONSIN. 

DELEGATES AT LARGE. 

H. L. Palmer, Nelson Dewey, 

S. Clark, Gabriel Bouck. 

DISTRICT DELEGATES. 

1. James A. Mallory, 4. F. O. Thorp, 
John Mather. F. W. Horn. 

2. E. B. Dean, Jr., 5. George Reid, 
S. T. Thorn. S. A. Pease. 

3. Jas. G. Knight, 6. Thomas B. Tyler, 
Charles G. Rodolf. Allen Dawson. 

Mr. Cox, of New York. — I move that the report be so amended that all the 
delegates in attendance from the District of Columbia be admitted to seats in 
this Convention on the terms mentioned in the report. 

Mr. Reeves, of Indiana, moved to lay the amendment on the table. 
Not agreed to. 

A delegate from Arkansas offered the following amendment, — 

Resolved, That the delegates from New Mexico and the other Territories 
of the United States be entitled to all the privileges of delegates from the 
several States, and that on all questions before the Convention each Terri- 
tory, through its delegation, shall be entitled to one vote. 

The question was taken on the amendment, and it was not agreed to. 

The report of the Committee on Credentials was then adopted. 

Mr. Kerr, of Pennsylvania, offered the following resolution, — 

Resolved, That it is the duty of every friend of constitutional liberty to 
sustain the President in his efforts to preserve the dignity of the nation, and 
the sacred rights of all the people against Radical usurpation and revolution. 
(Cheers.) He has survived the partisan malignity of inpeachment by the in- 
tegrity of men sworn to do their duty, and he now stands confidently, proudly, 
and above them, tiic most exalted man in the nation, repelling the assaults of 
the enemies of his country. (Cheers.) 

The President. — The resolution will be referred to the Committee 

on Resolutions. 

Mr. Nelson, of Tennessee, offered the following resolution, — 

Resolved, That the credentials of Mr. J. Waldron, who claims to be an 
alternate delegate from the Seventh Congressional District of Tennessee, be 
referred to the Committee on Credentials. 

The credentials were so referred. 

Mr. Nelson. — I would state to the Convention that Mr. Waldron appeared 
at a meeting of the Tennessee delegation this morning and claimed to be the 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 41 

alternate of the delegate from the Seventh District, presenting a certificate 
signed by the Secretary of the District Convention. I wish that the certifi- 
cate also be referred to the Committee on Credentials. 
The certificate was referred. 

Mr. Fenelon, of Kansas, offered the following resolution, — 
Resolved, That the honor, dignity, and solemn obligations of the govern- 
ment to its foreign-born citizens demand that the flag of the nation shall pro- 
tect them everywhere, precisely the same as native-born citizens. (Great 
applause.) 

The resolution was referred to the Committee on Resolutions. 
Mr. Wright, of Delaware, offered the following resolution, — 
Resolved, That a committee of one from each State, to be selected by the 
delegations thereof, be appointed to form a National Executive Committee. 

The resolution was adopted. 

Mr. Hall, of New York, offered the following resolution, — 

Resolved, That the nation's thanks are clue to Chief Justice Chase for his 
distinguished ability, impartiality, and fidelity to constitutional duty in pre- 
siding over the Court of Impeachment. (Cheers.) 

The resolution was referred to the Committee on Resolutions. 

Mr. Richardson, of Illinois. — Mr. Chairman, the resolution just adopted 
by the Convention, in relation to the appointment of a National Executive 
Committee, has not been executed; and I ask that the roll of the States may 
be called in order that we may appoint a National Executive Committee. 

The President requested the gentleman to reduce his motion to 

writing. 

Mr. W. M. Randall, of Ohio, offered the following resolution, — 

Resolved, That we are in favor of increasing the pensions of soldiers' 
widows and orphans of the late Federal Army by giving them the equivalent 
of gold. 

The resolution was referred to the Committee on Resolutions. 
Mr. Reeve, of Indiana, offered the following resolution, — 
Resulted, That while we recognize no man's right to thanks for doing his 
duty, we congratulate the President of the United States upon his successful 
preservation from the assaults of his enemies. (Applause.) 

The resolution was referred to the Committee on Resolutions. 

Mr. Richardson, of Illinois. — Mr. Chairman, I understand from a num- 
ber of gentlemen that they are not prepared now to name their member of the 
Executive Committee, and I modify my motion that each delegation report 
the name of its member to the Clerk to-morrow morning. 

The motion prevailed. 

Mr. Hurley, of Pennsylvania, offered the following resolution, — 

Resolved, That the amnesty proclamation of Andrew Johnson, President 
of the United States, be read by the Secretary. 

Mr. E. Brooks, of New York. — I move to amend the resolution so as to 
make it read, " That the amnesty proclamation of the President of the United 
States be approved by this Convention." 

The question was put on the amendment offered by Mr. Brooks, 
which prevailed. 



42 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF TI1E 

Mr. S. S. Cox, of New York, offered the following resolution, winch 
was received with applause and referred to the Committee on Resolu- 
tions, — 

Resolved, That this Convention approve of the doctrine applied by Secre- 
tary Marcy in the Kozta case, so that not merely full naturalization, but a dec- 
laration of intention in good faith, shall be the shield of American citizen- 
ship abroad. 

Mr. Clark, of Wisconsin. — I wonld like to inquire what has been done 
with the original resolution in regard to the amnesty proclamation. The 
amendment offered by the gentleman from New York (.Mr. Brooks) was 
adopted, bat nothing has been done since in regard to the original resolution. 

The PRESIDENT. —The Chair understood that the amendment of the gentle- 
man from New York (Mr. Brooks) was more in the nature of a substitute 
than amendment, and that it was adopted ; but if it is the will of the Conven- 
tion that the original resolution be voted upon, the Chair will put the question. 

Cries of " No, no ! " 

Mr. Brewer, of Pennsylvania, offered the following resolution, 
which was adopted unanimously, — 

Besolved, That the thanks of this Convention be tendered to Hon. Henry 
L. Palmer for the able, impartial, and satisfactory manner in which he dis- 
charged the duties of temporary chairman. 

The President. — What is the further pleasure of the Convention? 

Mr. BiGLER, of Pennsylvania. — As there seems to be no business before 
the Chair, and as the Convention is in a very comfortable and lit condition to 
proceed with important business, I move that the Convention do now pro- 
ceed to nominate a candidate for President of the United States. (Cheering.) 

Mr. Phillips, of Missouri. — I ask the gentleman to allow me first to offer 
this resolution, — 

Resolved, That the Delegates in this Convention pledge themselves, in 
advance of any nomination, to support the nominees of this Convention. 

Unanimously adopted. 

Mr. Hutchins, of Missouri, offered the following amendment to 
the resolution of Mr. Bigler, — 

Besolved, That no steps be taken towards the nomination of a candidate 
for the Presidency until after the platform shall have been presented. 
Mr. II r TCHLN8. — I ask for a vote by States on that amendment. 

The Secretary commenced calling the roll, and several States re- 
sponded. 

Mr. Bigler. — I am under the impression that there is a misapprehension 
as to the importance of the resolution I have offered. It is not intended that 
we shall proceed to ballot for the candidates immediately. The motion was 
intended to present the names, to nominate them; then proceed to fix an 
hour at which we will ballot for candidates. The amendment, as it stands 
now, involves the question of nominating the candidates in advance of a plat- 
form. For myself, I am in favor of that policy. The gentleman will see, 
therefore, that this is not the place for his amendment. 

A Delegate, from Michigan. — I rise to a point of order; that it is not in 
order to make remarks after the Clerk has commenced to call the roll. 

Mr. Bigleu. — I have proce.eded simply in explanation, for there is some 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 



43 



misunderstanding of my motion. I wish simply to say to the gentleman from 
Missouri (Mr. Hutchius), that the place for his amendment will be when the 
motion is substituted to proceed to ballot. 

Several Delegates. — ' ' Order ! " " order ! " 

The President. — The gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. Bigler) is re- 
quested to suspend one moment. The gentleman from Michigan raises the 
poiut of order that he is not in order, the calling of the I'oll having com- 
menced. Unless there are objections, however, the gentleman from Penn- 
sylvania will be allowed to state the effect, of his resolution, as it seems that 
it is not understood by the Convention, and therefore the amendment of the 
gentleman from Missouri is not exactly germane to the subject. The resolu- 
tion does not require that the committee shall proceed to select its candi- 
date, but merely shall now present names of candidates for consideration. 
Am I correct? 

Mr. Bigler. — Yes, sir, and fix the hour for the ballot. 

The President. — The Clerk will read the resolution. 

The Clerk read the resolution, and also the amendment. 

The President. — Does the gentleman from Missouri insist upon his 
amendment? 

Mr. HtJTCHiNS. — I do. If it is not in order as an amendment, I will offer 
it as a substitute. 

The President. — The amendment is in order. The Clerk will proceed to 
call the list of States, upon the amendment offered by the gentleman from 
Missouri (Mr. Hutchins). 

The Clerk proceeded to call the roll. 

The vote from Kentucky having been announced in the negative, 
a delegate from Kentucky, who did not announce his name, 
stated that six of the delegates voted for the amendment, and desired 
their votes to be so recorded. 

The delegation from New York asked leave to retire for considera- 
tion. There being no objection, leave was granted. 

The vote was as follows, — 



Yeas. Nays. 

Alabama 8 — 

Arkansas 5 — 

California 5 — 

Connecticut 6 — 

Delaware 3 — 

Florida 3 — 

Georgia 9 — 

Illinois — 16 

Indiana 13 — 

Iowa 8 — 

Kansas 3 — 

Kentucky — 11 

Louisiana 7 — 

Maine — — 

Maryland — 7 

Massachusetts 12 — 

Michigan 8 — 

Minnesota 4 — 

Mississippi 4 — 



Yeas. 

Missouri 10 

Nebraska — 

Nevada 3 

New Hampshire — 

New Jersey 7 

N. Carolina ih 

New York — 

Ohio 21 

Oregou 3 

Pennsylvania — 

Rhode Island 4 

South Carolina 6 

Tennessee 10 

Texas — 

Vermont 4 

Virginia — 

"West Virginia 5 

Wisconsin 8 



Navs. 
1 
3 

5 



26 



6 

1 
10 



44 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

Decided as carried by 189£ to 90J, New York and Maine not vot- 
ing. 

A delegate from California moved that the Convention do now ad- 
journ until to-morrow morning at ten o'clock. Lost. 

Mr. Belmont, of New York,offered the following, — 

Resolved, That the thanks of the Convention be given to the Sachems and 
members of the Tammany Society for having provided and surrendered their 
magnificent edifice for the accommodation of the Convention, and for their 
courteous and efficient assistance given to the National Committee in their 
preparations for the Convention. (Applause.) 

The resolution was unanimously adopted. 

A delegate from Pennsylvania offered the following, — 

Resolved, That it is the sense of this Convention, that in all future Demo- 
cratic Conventions the candidate who shall receive a majority of all the votes 
of the Electoral College shall be declared the nominee of the Convention. 

Cries of " No ! no ! " 

The delegate asked that it be referred to the Committee on Res- 
olutions. 

The President. — The resolution will be so referred if there be no objec- 
tion. 

Mr. J. A. Spaulding, of Kentuckj', offered the following, — 

Resolved, That the persons whose names may be presented to this Conven- 
tion as candidates for the nomination for President and Vice-President be 
pledged to support the nominees. (Applause.) 

The resolution was adopted. 

A number of delegates here tried to obtain the floor. 

The President. — The Convention will be in order. If delegates will allow 
us to dispose of the resolutions already sent up, we shall get along with our 
business much more rapidly. The Chair will try and recognize members in 
their order. But these resolutions are entitled to precedence. In no other 
way can the records of this Convention be preserved in order. 

Mr. Mattixgly, of Kentucky, offered the following, — 

Resolved by this Convention, That the President of the United States be 
requested to issue a proclamation of universal amnesty. (Applause.) 

Mr. Dawson, of Pennsylvania. — Mr. Chairman, I hope that that resolution 
will be put to a direct vote. I regard it as the most important resolution 
yet presented to this Convention, and I trust it will meet with unanimous 
support. 

The resolution was then again read and adopted. 

Mr. Bernard Schwartz, of Missouri, offered the following, — 

Resolved, That the Radical party in establishing two different currencies — 
one a depreciated paper currency for the masses of the people, the other a 
gold currency to pay the bondholders' interest — acted in direct violation of 
the best interests of the people; that honesty requires the speedy payment 
of t^e public debt, which can only be done by an economical administration 
of the government, and a judicious system of equalized taxation, so as to 
bring the country gradually back to specie payments, and that all efforts to 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 45 

try to force the payment of the five-twenty funded debt in coin before that 
time, arc in direct violation of law and justice. 

The President. — This resolution will be referred to the Committee on 
Resolutions, unless the Convention shall otherwise direct. 

Mr. Reed, of Missouri, offered the following, — 

Resolved, That in all cases where a call of States is demanded, in taking a 
vote, the business of the Convention be suspended for five minutes to enable 
delegations to consult. 

The resolution was adopted. 

Mr. Charles E. Stuart, of Michigan. — I desire, sir, to have the resolu- 
tion read, which this Convention has adopted, referring resolutions to the 
Committee on Resolutions, without debate. It seems, sir, that we are 
acting upon resolutions that, under the order of this body, are to go to the 
Committee on Resolutions. 

Mr. Murphy, of New York, stated that the resolution which he had 

offered yesterday, was as follows, — 

Resolved, That a committee of two from each State be selected by the del- 
egates thereof to be appointed a Committee on Resolutions; and that resolu- 
tions relating to the platform of the Democratic party be referred to that 
committee without debate. 

Mr. Crawford, of Nevada, offered the following, — 

Resolved, That the action of the government in prescribing the conditions 
of admission of States into the Federal Union, is a violation of the re- 
served rights of the States, and an infamous usurpation of power. (Cheers.) 

Referred to the Committee on Resolutions. 

Mr. Emerson, of Missouri, offered the following, — 

Resolved, That the Committee on Platform be informed of the action of this 
Convention, and requested to report the platform at the earliest possible mo- 
ment. (Applause.) 

Mr. Stuart, of Michigan. — The Committee on Resolutions are laboring as 
rapidly as possible in that work. We organized on Saturday evening, and con- 
tinued our labors till ten minutes past twelve o'clock. Of course we did noth- 
ing yesterday. The resolutions are in the hands of sub-committees, and we 
hope they will report to-day. I trust, therefore, this explanation will be sat- 
isfactory to the gentleman. 

Mr. Preston, of Kentucky. — The sub-committee are engaged on these 
resolutions, and the chairman will soon be ready to report. 

Mr. Vallandigham, of Ohio, moved that when this Convention ad- 
journ, it adjourn until three o'clock this afternoon. 

Mr. Stanton, of Kentucky, moved to amend by making the hour 
four o'clock instead of three. 

Mr. Vallandigham accepted the amendment. 

The motion, as amended, was carried. 

Mr. B. M. Boyer, of Pennsylvania. — I offer the following, — 

Resolved, That Andrew Johnson, President of the United States, by his able, 
zealous, and patriotic defence of the Constitution of this country, has entitled 
himself to the gratitude of this nation, and to the praise and blessings of the 
friends of constitutional liberty throughout the world. (Applause.) 



46 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

Mr. Boyer. — This being a resolution not referring to the platform of prin- 
ciples, but simply an acknowledgment, on the part of this Convention, of the 
national gratitude to a fearless and patriotic defender of the Constitution, I 
ask that it may be at once submitted, without debate, to the vote of this 
Convention. 

Objection being offered, the President ruled that the resolution 
could not be acted upon as requested. 

Mr. Richardson, of Illinois. — I move to refer to the Committee on Res- 
olutions, all resolutions that are upon the President's table, without reading. 

The President. — The resolution is not in accordance with the rules, inas- 
much as it would carry all resolutions to the Committee on Resolutions. 

Mr. Richardson. — Of course I do not mean to refer to that committee 
those resolutions that have already been acted upon. My resolution is in- 
tended to include only such resolutions as are now upon the President's table 
unacted upon. 

The resolution was reduced to writing, as follows, — 

Resolved, That all resolutions upon all subjects now upon the President's 
table be referred to the Committee on Resolutions, without being read. 

The resolution was adopted. 

On motion of Mr. White, of Maryland, the Convention then 

adjourned. 



Afternoon Session. 



The Convention assembled pursuant to adjournment. The Presi- 
dent, on taking the Chair, was greeted with three cheers. 

The President. — The Secretary will read to the Convention a letter that 
has just been received by the Chair. 

The Secretary read the following, — 

New York, July 6, 1868. 
My dear Sin, — A Committee of Conservative Soldiers and Sailors, from 
the Convention now in session in this place, desires to present itself to the 
Convention of which you are President, with an address in answer to the in- 
vitation to the privileges of the tloor, and it will be glad to know at what time 
you will receive it. 
We will be glad to be received as soon as it is convenient to the Convention. 
Very respectfully yours, 

YV. B. Franklin, President. 
Hon. Horatio Seymour, President National Democratic Convention. 

Mr. Woodward, of Pennsylvania. — I move that a committee of five be 
appointed by the Convention to wait upon the Committee of the Soldiers and 
Sailors' Convention, and invite them to come upon the floor. 

The motion prevailed. 

The President appointed the following gentlemen to constitute 
said Committee : Mr. Woodward, of Pennsylvania ; General McCook, 
of Ohio ; Mr. Miller, of Nebraska ; General Richardson, of Illinois, 
and Mr. Steele, of California. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 47 

General McCook asked to be excused from serving on the com- 
mittee, as be was about to leave the ball, and suggested that General 
George W. Morgan be appointed in bis place ; which suggestion was 
adopted. 

The Soldiers and Sailors' Committee, headed by the flag borne by 
Sergeant Bates, was received with loud cheers, the delegates rising. 

Mr. Brewer, of Pennsylvania, offered the following resolution, — 

Besolved, That no gentleman shall be declared the nominee of this Con- 
vention for President of the United States, unless he shall receive two-thirds 
of all the votes cast. 

Mr. Vallandigham, of Ohio. — I rise to the point of order that already this 
Convention has adopted the two-thirds rule, and that this motion is only 
superfluous. 

The resolution passed by this Convention adopts the rules of the Conven- 
tion of I860. 

Mr. Brewer, of Pennsylvania. — I do not desire to debate, but simply to 
say — 

Mr. Vaixahdigham. — I rise to another point of order, that a point of 
order is not debatable. 

At the suggestion of the President, the resolution was withdrawn 
to allow the Chair to inform himself upon the point. 

Mr. Woodward, of Pennsylvania, presented the Committee from 
the Convention of the Soldiers and Sailors. 

The Committee, on appearing in the hall, were received with the 
greatest enthusiasm, and, as the}^ passed to the front of the room, they 
were greeted with cheer upon cheer. Cheers were also given for 
General Franklin, General Slocum, and others. 

The Committee were requested to take positions upon the platform. 

The President. — The Chair has the honor to present to the Convention 
General Franklin, as one who represents here the Conservative Soldiers and 
Sailors of our country, who desire peace, union, and fraternal regard. (Tre- 
mendous cheering.) 

General Franklin. — I have been deputed by the Conservative Soldiers 
and Sailors' Convention sitting in this place, to present to you the Com- 
mittee. This Committee has for its Chairman, General H. W. Slocum, of this 
State, and it has prepared an address which it desires now to make known 
to the members of this Convention. (Cheers.) 

General Slocum appeared, and was greeted with great applause. 
He stated that the address referred to would be read by Colonel 
O'Beirne, the Secretary of the committee. 

Colonel O'Beirne read as follows, — 

Address of the Soldiers and Sailors. 

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Convention, — We are instructed 
by the unanimous vote of the Convention of the Union Soldiers and Sailors to 
return to you our thanks for extending to us the privileges of the floor of 
your Convention. (Cheers.) The objects for which we assembled are clearly 



48 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF TIIE 

set forth in the address of our presiding officers. Our Convention is com- 
posed of two thousand delegates, elected to represent every State and Terri- 
tory in the Union, who have all served in the Union army or navy, every 
oue of whom firmly believes that in co-operating at this time with the con- 
servative party of the country, he is still engaged in the same cause for which 
lie risked his life during the war, viz., to preserve the Union and maintain 
tiie supremacy of the Constitution. (Loud applause.) We believe that the 
objects now being perpetrated in the name of Republicanism and loyalty are 
not less alarming than were those committed by the armed foes of the gov- 
ernment during the war. (Applause.) The party now in power has de- 
stroyed the equality of the States, has forced the Southern States to submit 
to have their constitutions and laws framed by ignorant negroes jest released 
from a condition of servitude, while at the North it has denied the negro 
(although comparatively well educated) the right of suffrage. (Cheers.) It 
has attempted to influence the decision of the highest judicial tribunal of the 
land, by calling public meetings of excited partisans to condemn, in advance, 
all members of the court who might refuse to act in accordance with their 
dictation, while the leading journalists of the party, since the close of the 
impeachment trial, have denounced and vilified in the most unmeasured terms 
the once chosen leaders of their own party, going so far in some instances 
as to threaten them with personal violence,. and for no other reason than 
that they were unwilling to perjure themselves at the behest of party. 
(Cheers.) It has freely removed political disabilities from men at the North, 
wiio, before and during the war, were the most violent and malignant rebels, but 
who have since become the sycophants of the party in power, while it con- 
tinues to persecute those in the .same localities who havealways been true to 
the Union, but are now unwilling to be ruled by their recently emancipated 
slaws at the South. (Applause.) It has denied official positions to hundreds of 
the veterans of the war, most of whom are disabled by wounds received in 
battle, while it has foisted into place partisans of its own, having no claims 
upon the government, several of whom, fortunately for the country, have, 
during the past few months, become inmates of penitentiaries. It has placed ' 
the general of our armies beyond the control of the President of the United 
States (to whom the Federal Constitution makes him subordinate), has nomi- 
nated him for the Presidency, and the events of the last few months indicate 
that, by the use of the army thus under his supreme control, there is a deter- 
mination to cause the electoral votes of the Southern States to be cast for 
himself through force and fraud. (Cheers.) We solemnly declare our con- 
victions that the free institutions of the country have never been in greater 
jeopardy than at this time, and we look to the deliberations of the Democratic 
party now assembled in Convention with the deepest anxiety, feeling that 
upon its action depeuds the future prosperity of our nation. We earnestly 
trust and believe that no devotion to men or adherence to past issues will be 
permitted to endanger the success of the great party to which the country 
now looks with anxious eye for permanent peace and the prosperity of our 
free institutions. (Loud applause.) We believe that there are living half a 
million men who have served in the Union army and navy, who are in sympa- 
thy and in judgment opposed to the acts of the party in power, 
and at least another half a million of men who have heretofore acted with the 
Republican party, but who, reviewing with alarm the recent acts of that party, 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 49 

are now anxious for a change of administration, with a platform of principles 
reviving no dead issues, and looking only to the arrest of existing evils, and 
with candidates whose fidelity to the Constitution and devotion to the coun- 
try cannot lie questioned. We shall co-operate with you in this campaign 
with a degree of enthusiasm and confidence that will bring victory to our 
standard and salvation to the country. (Loud cheering.) 

/ 
W. B. Franklin, Duncan S. "Walker, 

II. W. Slocum, Thomas Kibby Smith, 

J. W. Denver, A. W. Bradbury, 

John a. McClernand, Jas. K. O'Beirne, 

Wm. W. Averell, James Parker, 

Wm. F. Smith, Eli C. Kinsler, 

James McQuade, Gordon Granger, 

John Love, Thomas Ewixg, Jr., 

C. E. Pratt, R. B. Mitchell, 

John J. Peck, E. B. Brown. 

At the conclusion of the reading of the address, three cheers were given 
for the soldiers and sailors, and calls were made for Gen. Thomas Ewing, Jr., 
of Ohio, who was introduced to the Convention, and was greeted by a round 
of applause. 

Speecli of General Eiving. 

Gentlemen of the Convention, — If it were appropriate for me, 
it would be impossible, for lack of voice, to express to this Con- 
vention the thankfulness which I and the members of the Convention and 
of the Committee feel for the cordial and enthusiastic manner of this recep- 
tion. We feel that the members of the two Conventions, however widely 
separated their paths may have been in the past, will march, henceforth, in 
one line. (Applause.) We earnestly wish to accomplish the purposes of the 
war as we understand them — (Applause) — the truly cordial, unconditional 
restoration of this Union. (Applause.) We have no sympathy for those 
purposes that have been falsely and dishonestly substituted by the Republican 
party for the avowed objects of the war. (Applause.) We care not for their 
dogmas of negro suffrage; we abhor their measures of white disfranchise- 
ment. (Applause.) We look upon them as enemies of the Republic, when 
we see them endeavoring, by means of that power, which a great, confiding 
people entrusted to them, to undermine and overthrow the settled foundations 
of our government. (Applause.) We cannot, we shall not, associate with 
them longer. (Applause.) We earnestly wish to associate with the great 
body of the Democracy, North and South (Applause) ; with thousands 
against whom we fought during the war (Applause) ; with thousands who 
felt perhaps coldly in the North towards the Union cause while the war went 
on, with all of those who now cordially accept as the established theory of 
the Constitution that the Union is unseverable, and who will stand by and 
defend the Constitution as interpreted by the government and the Supreme 
Court. (Applause.) Since our meeting here we have had the pleasure of 
friendly intercourse with many of the most prominent of the Generals of the 
Confederate army. (Applause.) Knowing them to be men of honor, com- 
paring views with them, and feeling that their views and our views as to the 
4 



50 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

present aud future policy of this government coincide, we will take them by 
the hand as brothers. (Applause.) Forgetting past issues and passions, we 
will recognize political enemies only in those who are plotting to overthrow 
the Union of the States and our constitutional form of government, and we 
will recognize political friends in all of those who will sustain us in endeavor- 
ing to overthrow that party. (Applause.) I thank you, gentlemen of the 
Convention, for the very unexpected honor of being called uoou to address 
you, and beg you will excuse me for this extempore effort. 

Cries of " Go on." 

Three cheers were given for General Ewing. 

Mr. TV. D. Turner, of Illinois, proposed three cheers for the soldiers- 
and sailors of the array and navy represented by the Convention at 
Cooper Institute. The cheers were given. 

Mr. Dowdell, of California, offered the following resolution, which 

was adopted, — 

"Resolved, That the address of the Soldiers and Sailors' Convention, just 
read by their Secretary, be received and entered upon the minutes of our 
proceedings, and become apart and parcel of the proceedings of this Con- 
vention. 

Mr. Miller, of Pennsylvania. — Will it be in order for me, sir, to ask for 
information of the Chair, whether individual delegates of this Convention 
may not be at liberty from this time until the adjournment of this Conven- 
tion, to file resolutions with the Secretary of the Convention, making them a 
part of the proceedings? I move that the further introduction of resolutions 
be suspended from this time. If I have any purpose in making that motion, 
it is to endeavor to see some cud of the introduction of resolutions by the 
members of this Convention. Every delegate seems to feel that he will not 
have fulfilled his mission as a delegate, unless he has spread upon the record 
a resolution, and, to such an extent, as, in my judgment, not to add very 
much to the strength of our proceedings when published to the world. 

The President. — The gentleman from Pennsylvania should reduce his 
resolution to writing. 

Mr. Miller, of Pennsylvania. — I withdraw it. (Laughter.) 

Mr. Eaton, of Connecticut. — There was a resolution passed this morn- 
ing that the platform should first be determined upon before any ballot should 
be taken for President. I understand, however, that the Committee on the 
Platform will not be able to report until to-morrow morning, and therefore I 
move to reconsider the vote upon the resolution. 

Mr. Buel, of Nevada. — I move to lay the motion of the gentleman from 
Connecticut (Mr. Eaton) on the table. 

Several delegates called for a vote by yeas and nays upon the mo- 
tion to lay on the table. 

Mr. Vallaxdigiiam. — Will not the effect of the motion to lay on the table, 
supposing it carried, be to continue the resolution in force? 

The President. — The Chair undei'stands that such will be the effect. 

Mr. Vallaxdigham. — Then I hope it will not prevail. 

Mr. Scott, of Pennsylvania. — Do I understand that, if the motion to lay 
on the table is carried, it carries the original resolution with it? 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 



51 



The President. — No. The gentleman from Connecticut (Mr. Eaton) 
moves to reconsider the vote upon the resolution this morning. The gentle- 
man from Nevada (Mr. Buel) moves to lay that motion on the table. The 
Chair understands that the e<fl*ect will simply be to carry with it the motion 
of the gentleman from Connecticut (Mr. Eaton), leaving the rule to stand, 
that no nominations shall be made until after the adoption of the platform. 

Mr. Stanton, of Kentucky. —I understand the rule adopted this morning 
to be, that when a vote by States was to betaken, delegates should first have 
five minutes for consultation and deliberation. 

The President. —Yes. A vote by States is now called for, and in five 
minutes from this time it will be taken. 

After five minutes' consultation the vote was taken by States upon 
laying upon the table the motion to reconsider, and the motion was 
rejected by the following vote, — 

Yeas. Nays. 

Nebraska — 33 

Nevada 3 

New Hampshire — 5 

New Jersey 54 oh 

New York — 33 

North Carolina 3 6 

Ohio — 21 

Oregon 2 1 

Pennsylvania — 26 

Ehocle Island 4 — 

South Carolina 6 — 

Tennessee 10 — 

Texas 6 

Vermont 5 — 

Virginia — 10 

West Virginia 2£ 2£ 

Wisconsin 8 — 

Total 142 172 



Yeas. Nays. 

Alabama 8 — 

Arkansas 5 — 

California 5 — 

Connecticut — 6 

Delaware 3 — 

Florida 3 — 

Georgia 9 — 

Illinois — 16 

Indiana 13 — 

Iowa — 8 

Kansas \h l£ 

Kentucky — 11 

Louisiana — 7 

Maine 3 3k 

Maryland h 6£ 

Massachusetts 12 — 

Michigan 8 — 

Minnesota 4 — 

Missouri lh oh 

Mississippi 7 — 

The President. — The question is now upon the adoption of the resolu- 
tion of the gentleman from Connecticut (Mr. Eaton), that the Convention 
now reconsider the resolution adopted this morning. 

Cries of " Question ! " " Question ! " 

A vote by States was called for, and the Chair announced a recess 
of five minutes, to enable the different delegates to consult. 

Mr. Slack, of Maryland. — I move to adjourn until ten o'clock to-morroW 
morning. 

The motion was lost. 

Mr. Brewer, of Pennsylvania. — I move that when this Convention ad- 
journ it adjourn to meet to-morrow morning at ten o'clock, and that hereafter 
the Convention upon adjournment will fix that hour for its meeting. 

Carried. 

The President. — The Clerk will now call the States in their order, for 
the purpose of taking the vote upon the resolution before the Convention. 

Mr. Finch, of Iowa. — I move that this Convention now adjourn. 

The motion to adjourn was lost. 



52 



OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 



The Secretary again read the resolution to reconsider the vote on 
the resolution that there be no balloting for candidates for President 
and Vice-President until after the report of the Committee on Resolu- 
tion- lie received ami adopted. • 

The vote by States was then taken with the following result, — 

Yeas. Nays. 
... — 3 



Yeas 

Alabama — 

Arkansas — 

California — 

Connecticut G 

Delaware l 

Florida — 

( reorgia 1 

Illinois 16 

Indiana 13 

Iowa 34 

Kansas 14 

Kentucky 11 

Louisiana — 

Maine 3 

Maryland G.J 

Massachusetts — 

Michigan — 

Minnesota 14 

Mississippi — 

Missouri 54 



X:ivs 
8 



54 



Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire • • • 

New Jersey 

New York 

North Carolina 

Ohio 2 

< iregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode* Island 

South Carolina .... 

Tennessee 

Texas 



Vermont 

Virginia 

West Virginia. 
Wisconsin 



5 


— 


24 


n 


33 


— 


6 


3 


21 


— 


1 


— 


26 


— 


— 


4 


— 


6 


— 


10 


— 


6 


— 


5 


— 


10 


24 


24 



Total 1704 137 



The President. — The question before the Convention is the resolution 
of the gentleman from Pennsylvania. A delegate from California has moved 
an amendment to that resolution, which is first in order. It will be read by 
the Clerk. It was in the hands of the Chair before other resolutions. 

The Secretary read the resolution of Mr. Hammond, of California, 

as follows, — 

Resolved, That Candidates for President may now be put in nomination, 
but that no ballot be had until a platform of principles is adopted. 

Mr. BlfiLBR. — I make a point of order on the amendment. It is precisely 
in substance what this body has voted down repeatedly. Therefore it is not 
in order. 

The President. — The motion of the gentlemen from Pennsylvania was 
this : Not that the Convention should proceed to ballot, but that the Conven- 
tion should proceed to nominate candidates. The gentleman from Califor- 
nia proposes by his amendment so to modify that resolution that no vote 
shall be taken to nominate until after the adoption of the. resolutions. The 
Chair thinks that is a resolution different from any that has been offered here- 
tofore, and is a modification of the resolution of the gentleman from Penn- 
sylvania. 

Mr. Bigler. — It would be in order provided it was divided. 

The President. — It is in the power of the gentleman to call a division of 
the question. 

Mr. Bigler. — I call for a division of the question. So far as it regards 
excluding a ballot until a platform is adopted is one division ; all that which 
precedes it is another. 



NATIOXAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 53 

Mr. Vaixaxdigii.vm. — What became of the motion of the gentleman from 
Missouri? If I understand it is still undisposed of. This proposition can 
only come in as amendment to. the amendment, no further amendment being 
in order. 

The President. — The gentleman from Ohio (Mr. Vallandigham) is right. 
The question before the Convention is the adoption of the resolution of the 
gentleman from Missouri, which had escaped the attention of the Chair. 

The Secretary read as follows, — 

Resolved, That no balloting for candidates for President or Vice-President 
be had until after the report of the Committee on Resolutions shall have been 
received and adopted. 

The resolution having been read, — 

Mr. IIuTCiiixs. of Missouri. — That resolution, with the permission of the 
gentleman who seconded it, I beg leave now to withdraw. 

Mr. Bicler. — Then I desire to modify that resolution, and to move that 
the States be called in their regular order, and that the candidates be pre- 
sented, and that there be conceded to each State five minutes to present the 
claims and character of the candidate whose name it desires to submit to the 
Convention. 

The President. — The gentleman from Pennsylvania now modifies his 
resolution so that it shall read as follows, — 

Resolved, That the call of States be called in their regular order, and that 
each State be allowed to present the name of any candidate for the Presi- 
dency, and that the delegates have live minutes allowed them to present their 
views upon their candidate. (Applause.) 

Mr. Brewer. — I second the resolution of the gentleman from Penns}dvania 
(Mr. Bigler). It occurred to me this morning when the motion was made by 
the gentleman from Penns3 T lvania to put in nomination candidates to be voted 
for, for the offices of President and Vice-President, that it was out of order and 
out of the usual custom of the Democratic party. Heretofore, in all nation- 
al Conventions, every State has had the right and been permitted to vote for 
any gentleman in this country, — whomsoever they might feel disposed to 
vote for. If we place in nomination some candidates, and they should then 
conclude that the nominations should close, there would be no power by 
which the Convention could afterwards go for a man whose name had not 
been already presented to the Convention. I second this resolution, because 
I consider it correct, and the other resolution incorrect and contrary to the 
usages and practices of the Democratic party. We desire that every State 
shall present and vote for the candidate of her choice. 

Mr. Hammond, of California! — Now I apprehend that it will be in order 
for me to otter my resolution, as there is no original resolution pending. I 
oner the following resolution as a substitute for the whole matter, — 

Resolved, That candidates for the Presidency ma}' now be placed in nomi- 
nation, but that no balloting be had until the platform of principles is 
adopted. (Applause.) 

Mr. Graves, of Kentucky, moved the previous question. 
The motion not being seconded, the vote was taken on the amend- 
ment of Mr. Hammond, and the question decided in the negative. 



54 



OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 



The 'question recurred on the resolution of the delegate from Mis- 
souri. 

Mr. Bigler. — I shall be obliged to call for a division of that resolution, as 
the latter clause of the resolution has already been decided three times iu 
succession. 

The President. — The gentleman from Pennsylvania calls for a division 
of the question upon the ground that the resolution contains two distinct 
propositions The first part of the resolution is ; "Besolved, That candidates 
for the Presidency be now placed iu nomination;'' and the second point : 
'• That no balloting be had until the platform of principles is adopted." Mr. 
Bigler proposes now to vote upon the first branch, after which a vote will be 
taken upon the latter proposition 

Mr. Bigler. — Mr. President, I withdraw my call for a division. 

The amendment was lost. 

The question recurred on the resolution of Mr. Bigler. It was 
adopted. 

Mr. James Ponder, of Delaware, moved that the Convention do 
n<»w adjourn. 

The vote on adjournment was taken by States, with the following 
result, — 



Y*-as. 

Alabama 8 

A rkansas 5 

California 6 

Delaware 8 

Florida 3 

( leorgia 8 

Illinois 16 

Iowa Gi 

Kansas 3 

Louisiana 7 

Maine 4 

Massachusetts 12 

Michigan 8 

Minnesota 4 

Mississippi 7 

Missouri 64 

Nevada 3 

New Hampshire 2 

New Jersey 44 

New York! 33 

North Carolina 6 

Oregon 3 

Rhode Island 4 

South Carolina 6 

Tennessee ; 10 

Texas 6 

Vermont 5 

Virginia 10 

Vest Virginia 24 

Wisconsin 8 



Total 209 

The Convention then adjourned until Tuesday at ten o'clock. 



Nays. 

Connecticut 6 

( reorgia 1 

Indiana 13 

Iowa 14 

Kentucky 11 

.■Maine 24 

Maryland 7 

Missouri 3 

Nebraska 3 

New Hampshire 3 

New Jersey 24 

North Carolina 3 

Ohio 21 

Pennsylvania 26 

West Virginia 24 

Total 106 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 55 

The delegates from the Territories admitted to seats on the floor 
in pursuance of the resolution adopted, were : Thomas W. Betts, of 
Idaho Territory ; Thomas E. Evershed, of Arizona Territory. 



THIRD DAY. 

July 7, 1868. 

The President being slightly indisposed, although present on the 
platform, the Convention was called to order by General Thomas L. 
Price, of Missouri. 

The President pro tern, introduced Rev. Dr. Pltjmmer, who opeue<l 
the proceedings by the following prayer, the whole convention rising. 

Prayer. 

Almighty autl Glorious Jehovah, Father of men and of nations, we ap- 
proach Thy eternal and propitious throne, confessing that we are sinful and 
deserve not the least of all Thy manifold mercies. Though we, as a people, 
have seen afflictions by the rod of Thy wrath, yet Thou hast punished us less 
than our iniquities deserve. We have insulted and provoked Thee to auger 
by our ingratitude, unbelief, and love of the world; by our pride, profaue- 
ness, and forgetfulness of Thee. Oh! forgive us our sins. In days gone past 
Thou hast greatly blessed us ; our history is full of striking instances of Thy 
goodness; our brothers have told us true and wonderful stories of Thy love 
and mercy: even now we enjoy many favors wholly gracious. We thank Thee 
for the precious things of Heaven, for the dew, and for the deep that worketh 
beneath, and for the precious fruits brought forth hy the sun, and for the pre- 
cious things put forth by the moon, and for the chief things of the ancient moun- 
tains, and for the precious things of the lasting hills, and for the precious things 
of the earth, and above all for the good will of Him who dwelt in the bush. 
We bless Thee for Thy couutless benefits, temporal and spiritual. Continue 
to do us good. Chasten us, yet in measure, for our good; but smite us not in 
Thy hot displeasure. Let the solemn event by which Thou hast suddenly removed 
a member of this body from the fleeting scenes of time to the awful realities of 
eternity be sanctified to us all. In mercy, pity and sustain the family thus cast 
into deep sorrow.* Pour not upon us the vials of Thy wrath. Spare as accord- 
ing to the greatness of Thy mercy. In Thy tender compassion compose our 
public agitations; protect the injured; relieve the distressed; judge the 
widow; be the orphans' God; cause all human sufferings to lead men to 
repentance and to Thee ; make all our people devout worshippers of the God 
of Heaven; let violence no more be heard in our land, wasting nor destruc- 
tion in our borders: give our senators wisdom; make our officers peaceful 
and our exactors righteous; so bless us that our men shall call our walls 
salvation and our gates praise. Oh ! send us, when, how. and by whom Thou 
wilt, but send us enlargement and deliverance; allay the vindictive passions 
of men ; teach them to forgive and to forget, to pity and to bless. Let the 
mountains bring forth grace, and the little hills righteousness. Lord our 
God, be thou our shield, our glory, and the lifter up of our heads. Guide the 
deliberations of this Convention to such conclusions as shall promote Thy 
glory and the public welfare. Deliver not this nation over to misrule, to 
despotism, to anarchy, to sectional animosity, nor to internecine strifes. 
Preserve to us and our posterity unimpaired the liberties, civil and religious, 
received from our fathers, and bought with their toils and tears and blood. 
So will we, Thy people and the sheep of thy pasture, show forth Thy praise 
forever and ever, through Jesus Christ, oar strength and Redeemer. ~ Amen. 

Mr. Bigler, of Pennsylvania.— I move to dispense with the readiugol the 
journal of yesterday's proceedings. (The motion prevailed.) 

* Referriigto the death of Teter Cagger, of New York. 



56 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF TI1E 

Resolutions from Alex. H. Stephens. 

Mr. Wright, of Delaware. — I hold in ray hand a series of resolutions, 
which I have received from Hon. Alexander H. Stephens, of Georgia — 
(Applause) — which I ask to have read and referred to the Committee on 
Resolutions. 

The resolutions were read as follows, and were received with re- 
peated applause. 

Besolved, That in the future, as in the past, we will adhere with unswerving 
fidelity to the Union under the Constitution as the only solid foundation of 
our strength, security, and happiness as a people, and as a framework of gov- 
ernment equally conducive to the welfare and prosperity of all the States — 
both Northern and Southern. 

Besolved, That the Union established by the Constitution is a Union of 
- Federal in its character, composed of States thereby united, and is 
incapable of existence without the States as its continuing integral parts: 
and. therefore, the perpetuation of the Union in its integrity depends upon 
the preservation of the States in their political integrity, — the government of 
the United States being a Federal Republic, and not a consolidation of the 
whole people into a nation. 

Besolved, That the perpetuation of the Union, and the maintenance of the 
government as both were established by the Constitution, and as both under 
the Constitution have been expounded in the foregoing resolutions, in con- 
formity with the venerable teachings of Jefferson, Madison, and Jackson, 
have ever been held as cardinal doctrines of the Democratic party ; and they 
are now reiterated with increased earnestness under the solemn conviction 
that only by bringing back the administration of the government to the 
time-honored principles (on which for sixty years there was such unparal- 
leled happiness and prosperity) ; and in rescuing it from those who have ever 
held the Constitution itself to be no better than a " covenant with death and 
an agreement with Hell;" whose revolutionary policy and measures have 
brought such general discord, strife and war with its attendant ills upon a 
large portion of the country, and such wide-spread demoralization through- 
out the whole of it. 

Besolved, That the Democratic party, in sustaining the Federal administra- 
tion in the late unhappy conflict of arms, did so in good faith, with the hope 
and earnest wish to maintain the principles above set forth, and with no view 
of "waging war" on the part of the Northern States -'in any spirit of 
oppression " against their brethren of the South, nor for any purpose of con- 
quest or subjugation, nor purpose of overthrowing or interfering with the 
rights or established institutions of the States ; but to defend and maintain 
the supremacy of the Constitution, and to preserve the Union with all the 
dignity, equality, and rights of the several States unimpaired. The subjuga- 
tion of these States, or the holding of them as coiupierred territory, would 
be, in the judgment of the Convention, the destruction of the Union itself. 

Besolved, That the highest meed of patriotism is due, and should ever be 
rendered to all those who, in the recent war, perilled life or fortune for the 
maintenance of the Union, and the beneficent system of American Govern- 
ment thereby established upou the fundamental principles set forth in the 
foregoing resolution; but we have neither thanks nor sympathy for those 
who entered or carried on the contest for the subjugation of States, or for 
the subjugation by Federal authority of the white race in any of the States 
to the dominion of the black. The right of suffrage, of who shall exercise 
political power, is a matter that rests, under the Constitution, exclusively 
with the several States. There it properly belongs, and there it should con- 
tinue ever to remain. 

The resolutions were referred to the Committee on Resolutions. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 57 

Mr. RicnARDSON, of Illinois. — I move that all resolutions hereafter intro- 
duced to the Convention be referred to the Committee on Resolutions without 
reading. We shall commit some mistake, or indorse some doctrine that we 
can not defend upon the stump, and ought not to defend, if we pass all resolu- 
tions that are presented here. 

Mr. Bradford, of Delaware. — I am opposed to that motion, because I 
think it is due to those that offer them that they shall be read before the 
Convention. 

Mr. Tarbill, of Ohio. — I move to amend the motion of the gentleman 
from Illinois, so that it shall apply only to resolutions touching the principles 
of the platform. 

Mr. Richardson. — I accept that. I do not know exactly how we are to 
determine what does refer to the platform, but I will accept the proposition. 

Mr. Bigler, of California. — I have in my possession resolutions adopted 
by the California Democratic State Convention, which I simply wish to pre- 
sent to go with the others, and ask that they be read. 

Mr. Cox, of New York. — I wish to say to the Convention that there is no 
necessity for the motion of the gentleman from Illinois (Mr. Richardson), and 
I think he will withdraw it when he understands that the Committee on 
Resolutions are now ready to report, and there will be no occasion for fur- 
ther resolutions of this kind. 

Mr. Bigler, of Pennsylvania. — I move to lay the motion of the gentleman 
from Illinois upon the table. 

Resolutions of the California Convention. 

The Secretary read the following resolutions presented by ex-Gov. 
Bigler of California, adopted by the California Labor Convention, — 

Resolved, That it is not only the patriotic duty, but the deliberate purpose 
"of the Democratic party never to submit to be governed by the negro, nor by 
those claiming to be elected by negro suffrage; and we do earnestly recom- 
mend the adoption of this resolution by the National Convention of the 
Democracy, which shall assemble in July next. 

Besvlced, That the eight-hour law system of labor is a Democratic measure, 
and ought of right to become a national principle, making eight hours a legal 
day's work on all public works in the United States; that our delegation to 
the National Convention are requested to use- their endeavors to incorporate 
this declaration in the National Platform. 

Mr. Riciiaudsox, of Illinois. — I move to refer these resolutions and any 
that may be offered hereafter, to the Committee on the Platform, and I insist 
upon that question. 

Mr. Bigler. — I move to lay that motion on the table. 

The question was put on the motion to lay on the table, and it was 
rejected. 

The question recurred upon the motion of Mr. Richardson. 

Mr. Vallaxdigham. — I submit that if the resolution is adopted in that 
form it carries to the table even a motion to proceed to vote for President, 
as well as any other form of proceeding. 



58 OFFICIAL PROCEEDIXGS OF THE 

Committee on Resolutions. 

Mr. Cox, of New York. — I rise to a point of order that the Committee on 
Resolutions have the right to report at any time, and are now seeking the 
recognition of the Chair for that purpose, and that other business should not 
interfere with the report of the Committee. 

Mr. Murphy, of New York, Chairman of the Committee on Resolutions. 
— I am directed by the Committee on Resolutions to report the Platform, 
which 1 hold in my hand, and which I ask permission to read to the Conven- 
tion. (Applause.) 

Mr. Monroe, of Nevada. — I am directed by gentlemen around me to call 
the attention of the Chair to the fact that it will be interesting and important 
to us all to hear each word of the resolutions. While the venerable gentle- 
man was praying for us this morning I noticed that his voice, weak as it was, 
could be heard all over the hall. I heard every word distinctly, and if it 
takes from now until next winter to restore order so that we can hear the 
resolutions, I think it ought to be done, so that we maybe able to act intelli- 
gently upon the platform. 

The President pro tern. — Gentlemen, you will please take your seats and 
keep profound silence. We hope that there will be not a whisper in the hall 
while the resolutions are being read. Mr. Murphy, of New York, will pro- 
ceed to read the resolutions. 

Mr. Murphy then advanced to the stage, amid much cheering, and 
read the Platform as follows, — 

The Platform. 

The Democratic party in National Convention assembled, reposing its trust 
in the intelligence, patriotism, and discriminating justice of the people; 
Standing upon the Constitution as the foundation and limitation of the powers 
of the government, and the guaranty of the liberties of the citizen; and 
recognizing the questions of slavery and secession as having been settled 
for all time to come by the war, or the voluntary action of the Southern 
States in Constitutional Conventions assembled, and never to be renewed or 
reagitated; t\'><^. with the return of peace, demand, 

First. Immediate restoration of all the States to their rights in the Union, 
under the Constitution, and of civil government to the American people. 

Second. Amnesty for all past political offences, and the regulation of the 
elective franchise in the States, by their citizens. 

Third. Payment of the public debt of the United States as rapidly as prac- 
ticable. All moneys drawn from the people by taxation, except so much as 
is requisite for the necessitiesof the governmeut, economically administered, 
being honestly applied to such payment, and where the obligations of the 
government do not expressly state upon their face, or the law under which 
they were issued does not provide, that they shall be paid in coin, they ought, 
in right and in justice, be paid in the lawful money of the United States. 

Fourth. Equal taxation of every species of property, accordiugto its real 
value, including government bonds and other public securities. 

Fifth. One currency for the government and the people, the laborer and the 
office-holder, the pensioner and the soldier, the producer and the bond-holder. 

Sixth. Economy in the administration of the government, the reduction 
of the standing army and navy ; the abolition of the Freedmen's Bureau ; and 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 59 

all political instrumentalities designed to secure negro supremacy; simplifi- 
cation of the system and discontinuance of inquisitorial modes of assessing 
and collecting internal revenue, so that the burden of taxation may be equal- 
ized and lessened, the credit of the government increased and the currency 
made good ; the repeal of all enactments for enrolling the State militia into 
national forces in time of peace ; and a tariff for revenue upon foreign im- 
ports, such as will afford incidental protection to domestic manufactures, and 
as will, without impairing revenue, impose the least burden upon, and best 
promote and encourage the great industrial interests of the country. 

Seventh. Reform of abuses in administration; the expulsion of corrupt 
men from office ; the abrogation of useless offices ; the restoration of right- 
ful authority to, and the independence of the executive and judicial depart- 
ments of the government; the subordination of the military to the civil 
power, to the end that the usurpations of Congress and the despotism of the 
sword may cease. 

Eighth. Equal rights and protection for naturalized and native-born 
citizens at home and abroad ; the assertion of American nationality, which 
shall command the respect of foreign powers, and furnish an example and 
encouragement to people struggling for national integrity, constitutional 
liberty, and individual rights, and the maintenance of the rights of national- 
ized citizens against the absolute doctrine of immutable allegiance and the 
claims of foreign powers to punish them for alleged crimes committed be- 
yond their jurisdiction. 

Iu demanding these measures and reforms we arraign the Radical party for 
its disregard of right, and the unparalleled oppression and tyranny which 
have marked its career. 

After the most solemn and unanimous pledge of both Houses of Congress 
to prosecute the war exclusively for the maintenance of the government and 
the preservation of the Union under the Constitution, it has repeatedly vio- 
lated that most sacred pledge, under winch alone was rallied that noble volun- 
teer army which carried our flag to victory. 

Instead of restoring the Union, it has, so far as iu its power, dissolved it, 
and subjected ten States, in time of profound peace, to military despotism 
and negro supremacy. 

It has nullified there the right of trial by jury; it has abolished the habeas 
corpus, that most sacred writ of liberty ; it has overthrown the freedom of 
speech and of the press; it has substituted arbitrary seizures and arrests, 
and military trials and secret star-chamber inquisitions, for the constitutional 
tribunals ; it has disregarded in time of peace the right of the people to be 
free from searches and seizures ; it has entered the post and telegraph offices, 
and even the private rooms of individuals, and seized their private papers and 
letters without any specific charge or notice of affidavit, as required by the 
orgauic law; it has converted the American capitol into a Bastile; it has es- 
tablished a system of spies and official espionage to which no constitutional 
monarchy of Europe would now dare to resort ; it has abolished the right of 
appeal, on important constitutional questions, to the Supreme Judicial tri- 
bunal, and threatens to curtail, or destroy, its original jurisdiction, which i> 
iri'evocably vested by the Constitution ; while the learned Chief Justice has 
been subjected to the most atrocious calumnies, merely because he would not 
prostitute his high office to the support of the false and partisan charges pre- 



60 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

ferred against the President. Its corruption and extravagance have exceeded 
anything known in history, and by its frauds aud monopolies it lias nearly 
doubled the. burden of the debt created by the war; it has stripped the 
President of his constitutional power of appointment even of his own Cabi- 
net. Under its repeated assaults the pillars of the government are rocking 
on their base, and should it succeed in November next aud inaugurate its 
president, we will meet as a subject and conquered people amid the ruins of 
liberty and the scattered fragments of the Constitution. 

And we do declare and resolve, That ever since the people of the United 
States threw off all subjection to the British crown, the privilege and trust 
of suffrage have belonged to the several States, and have been granted, 
regulated, and controlled exclusively by the political power of each State 
respectively, and that any attempt by Congress, on any pretext whatever, to 
deprive any State of this right, or interfere with its exercise, is a flagrant 
usurpation of power, which can find no warrant in the Constitution ; and if 
sanctioned by the people will subvert our form of government, and can only 
end in a single centralized and consolidated government, in which the sep- 
arate existence of the States will be entirely absorbed, and an unqualified 
despotism be established in place of a federal union of co-equal States ; and 
that we regard the reconstruction acts, so called, of Congress, as such an 
usurpation, and unconstitutional, revolutionary, and void. 

That our soldiers and sailors, who carried the flag of our country to victory 
against a most gallant and determined foe, must ever be gratefully remem- 
bered, and all the guaranties given in their favor must be faithfully carried 
into execution. 

That the public lands should be distributed as wisely as possible among the 
people, and should be disposed of either under the pre-emption or homestead 
laws, or sold in reasonable quantities, and to none but actual occupants, at the 
minimum price established by the government. When grants of the public 
lands may be deemed necessary for the encouragement of important public 
improvements, the proceeds of the sale of such lands, and not the lands 
themselves, should be so applied. 

That the President of the United States, Andrew Johnson, in exercising 
the powers of his high office, in resisting the aggressions of Congress upon 
the Constitutional rights of the States and the people, is entitled to the 
gratitude of the whole American people ; and, in behalf of the Democratic 
party, we tender him our thanks for his patriotic efforts in that regard. 

Upon this platform the Democratic party appeals to every patriot, includ- 
ing all the Conservative element, aud all who desire to support the Constitution 
and restore the Union, forgetting all past differences of opinion, to unite 
with us in the present great struggle for the liberties of the people ; and 
that to all such, to whatever party they may have heretofore belonged, we 
extend the right hand of fellowship, aud hail all such co-operating with us as 
friends and brethren. 

At the conclusion of the reading of the platform, Mr. Murphy said, — 

As might have been expected in the preparation of this platform there were 
differences of opinion, which, however, upon consultation, have vanished. I 
say to this Convention that this platform has received the unanimous ap- 
proval of the Committee. (Great applause.) And. sir, in view of this fact, I 
move the previous question upon its adoption. (Applause.) 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. CI 

The Secretary. — Mr. Murphy, of New York, Chairman of the Committee 
on Resolutions, mores the previous question on the Platform. The question 
now before the Convention is, Shall the previous question be ordered? 

Cries of " Question ! " " question ! " 

The previous question was seconded, and the main question ordered, 
by an overwhelming and unanimous vote. 

A Delegate. — I should like to hear those resolutions read again. 

Cries of " No, no ! " and " Question ! " 

The President pro tern, put the question upon the adoption of the 
Platform, and an unanimous and tremendous vote was given in the 
affirmative. Not a single dissenting voice answered in response to 
the call of those opposed. 

A scene of the wildest enthusiasm succeeded ; the Convention and 
the spectators rose en masse ; cheer upon cheer resounded through 
the building, and the waving of hats and handkerchiefs, and various 
demonstrations of applause continued for several minutes. 

When Quiet was restored the business of the Convention proceeded. 

Motion to Proceed to Nominations. 

Mr. Bigler, of Pennsylvania. — I offer the following resolution, — 
Besolved, That the Convention do now proceed to nominate a candidate for 
President of the United States. 

Great applause, and cries of " Question ! " 

The question was put and carried unanimously, amid cheering. 

Mr. Vai.laxdigham. — I move to reconsider the vote by which the res- 
olution of the gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. Bigler) was adopted, and 
to lay that motion on the table. 

The motion was agreed to. 

Construction of tlie Two-Thirds Mule. 

The President, Hon. Horatio Seymour (who here resumed the Chair). — 
Before the Committee proceeds to ballot, to avoid all possible misunderstand- 
ing, it is proper that this Convention should understand and clearly define 
what the two-thirds rule is. The Chair is exceedingly anxious that no ques- 
tion shall be decided by it after a ballot that can, by any possibility, lead to 
any misunderstanding or any disappointment. The Chair holds itself ready 
iu the construction of the two-thirds rule to be governed by the directions of- 
this Convention. We have adopted the rules which governed the Convention 
in 1801. The Convention of 18G4 adopted the rules that governed the Con- 
vention of 18G0. I see before me a number of eminent gentlemen — one from 
Illinois, another from Michigan, and others from other States — who were 
conspicuous members of that Convention. I was not a member of that body, 
but I have read through its proceedings with a view of understanding what 
that rule is. I will direct the Clerk to read the decision of the Convention iu 
Charleston in 1860. and the decision of the Convention when it met again at 
Baltimore under another chairman, after the unfortunate disruption of that 
body. When those resolutions have been read, if there is any one who 



62 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

wishes to have any further interpretation of these resolutions, I beg the Con- 
vention will act upon this matter now. It is exceedingly important after a 
vote has been takeu, where it is possible that the decisions of the Chair might 
be held to help or hurt a candidate, — it is exceedingly important that he 
should make no decisions which are not in accordance with the clear sense of 
this Convention. The Chair should not have thrown upon it the responsi- 
bility of any duty so delicate. If all the delegates to this Convention shall 
vote when we nominate a candidate, no difficulties can arise. But if all should 
not vote, the question would come up, should two-thirds of all the members 
of this Convention, or should two-thirds of those who voted, make the 
nomination? I, therefore, ask upon this subject that the Convention shall 
instruct the Chair as to the right interpretation of that resolution. 

Mr. Richardson, of Illinois. — Mr. President, I desire to submit a reso- 
lution, that two-thirds of all the votes cast shall decide the question. I want 
to say another thing. I shall not now move to repeal this two-thirds rule, 
but, after we have nominated a candidate, I shall move its repeal for all future 
Conventions. It is the most mischievous rule ever adopted by the Democratic 
party. As soon as we nominate a candidate I shall deem it my duty to bring 
forward the resolution, so as to prevent its obtaining in all future Conventions. 
A majority of the party should control the party. I want to get out of the 
wilderness. (Laughter.) I want to safely laud. I want to stand upon the 
Constitution of our country, and the supreme law of the land. 

The Secretary read the resolution, for information, as follows, — 

That two-thirds of all the votes cast shall be required to nominate a can- 
didate for President, ami Vice-President of the United States. 

Mr. Kkiixan, of New York. —I believe, Mr. President, and I hope that no 
real issue will arise in this Convention in reference to the subject-matter of 
this resolution. Not only do we want to get out of the wilderness, but., for 
the sake of the country, we want to win in the coming contest. (Great 
cheering.) Our Convention beiug, as I rejoice to know, composed of rep- 
resentatives from the Democratic Conservative men of every State in the 
Union (Applause), I desire that we may act in unison, and that we shall 
nominate no man in this important contest who does not command the best 
judgment of two-thirds of the representatives here. (Cheers.) It is, there- 
fore, sir, in no other sense that I rise to ask this Convention not to change 
the rule which has hitherto prevailed, and not to adopt the resolution of my 
respected friend from Illinois. I believe, sir, that we should not place our- 
selves in such a position that the representatives of any one State should 
affect the result of our deliberations by refusing to act for their constituents 
in this important contest. Let the delegates from every State give up, not 
their feelings nor their prejudices, but their judgment in reference to the man 
who is to be our standard-bearer. (Cheers.) I do not want my judgment to 
prevail if I find that two-thirds of the gentlemen of the Convention are 
opposed to my judgment, nor do I want the judgment of others to prevail 
except they shall succeed in satisfying two-thirds of all the delegates from all 
the States that the man they select is the one best calculated to lead us on 
to victoiy, and rescue us from the misrule of Radical faction. (Great ap- 
plause.) Therefore I submit that we should adhere to the rule that has 
hilherto prevailed, vote down the resolution, and go into the ballot like 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. G3 

brothers, saying that the man who shall command the votes of two-thirds 
of the delegates from the States shall be our standard-bearer, and that no- 
body else shall. (Loud applause.) 

Mr. Richardson, of Illinois. — I have said that I was in favor of the two- 
thirds rule if we make our nominations to-day. 

Mr. Clymer, of Pennsylvania. — Mr. President, I chanced by the kindness 
of the Committee on Organization to be its chairman. When it reported the 
rule with reference to what regulations should govern the proceedings of 
this body, it was deemed important that a very clear understanding should 
be had upon this important subject, and it may be interesting to you, sir, and 
this Convention, to know what was the construction placed upon this rule by 
that committee. I will state that I believe it was the unanimous judgment 
of that committee, when it reported the rule, that it required, not two- 
thirds of the vote cast, but two-thirds of the vote of the entire Electoral 
College to nominate. (Cries of "Good," and applause.) Therefore, I move, 
sir, to substitute for the resolution of the honorable gentleman from Illinois 
(Mr. Richardson), the following, which I send to the desk. 

A Delegate from Louisiana. — Mr. President, I desire to ask what has be- 
come of the resolution which was offered by the gentleman from Maryland. 
I want it read. 

Mr. Richardson, of Illinois. — Mr. President, I will withdraw my whole 
proposition; but I give notice, that when I advance with a candidate to a 
majority vote, I will camp with the majority, and stay there to the eud. 
(Laughter.) 

The President. — If the resolution is withdrawn, the Chair advises this 
Convention that it should adopt the construction which was put upon this 
resolution iu 1SG0, by the President of the Convention, at Charleston, and by 
the President of the Convention, at Baltimore. The Chair understands that 
the decision at Charleston (which decision was assented to afterwards at 
Baltimore) was that it required two-thirds of the electoral votes to nomi- 
nate. (Applause.) In order that the Convention may understand this, I will 
ask the Secretary to read the decision there made. The only wish of the 
Chair in this matter is to prevent any possible misunderstanding from aris- 
ing as to the rule under which we act. With this understanding, if the Con- 
vention assents to it, the subject will be dropped. 

Mr. White, of Maryland. — Inasmuch as the decision of the Chair is ex- 
actly in accordance with my resolution, I will withdraw it. 

The Secretary, by direction of the President, then read from the 
report, the decision of the Chair made at the Democratic Conven- 
tion of 1860, as follows, — 

The resolution passed at Charleston, as understood by the President of 
this Convention, as understood by the present occupaut of the Chair, was 
not a change in the rule requiring a two-thirds' vote to be given to nominate, 
but merely a direction given to the Chair, by the Convention, not to declare 
any one nominated until he had received two-thirds of the votes of the 
Electoral ColLege; and the present occupant of the Chair will not feel at 
liberty, under that direction, to declare any one nominated until he gets 202 
votes, unless the committee shall otherwise instruct him. 

Mr. Bigler, of Pennsylvania, moved that the roll of States be 



64 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THS 

called, and that the delegates of the several States proceed to the 
nomination of candidates for the Presidency. 

A Delegate from Delaware. — Several gentleman here desire to'know the 
exact electoral vote. 

The President. — The entire electoral vote is 317. 

Mr. A. Oakey Hall, of New York. — I offer the following resolution, — 

Resolved, That whereas the following States are represented in this Con- 
vention, with the following electoral vote (here follows the official tally, 
State by State, as part of the resolution), the whole number of delegates in 
the Convention being 317, two-thirds of which are 211i, that no person shall 
be nominated unless he shall receive 212 votes. 

A delegate moved to lay the resolution on the table. 

The President. — The Chair is of the opinion that the Convention has 
already settled this question, and that the resolution is not in order, because 
it is simply carrying out what has already been decided. 

The President. — Before the States are called, I wish to say one word to 
the audience. It has been a subject of complaint, and the Chair perhaps lias 
been much at fault, that we have allowed so much latitude to those who have 
come up to witness our proceedings. There has been so much that went 
straight to the Democratic heart, that we could not repress such manifesta- 
tions (Cheers) ; but while this is true, our audience must remember that 
so far as the business of this Convention is concerned, it is unfit and im- 
proper for them In any degree to attempt to influence its action by their 
manifestations. And let me say another thing. While the tickets to this 
Convention have been given out in their proportion to every delegate, in the 
very nature of things a large share of this audience is drawn from the great 
city in which we meet. And let me reinforce my appeal to them by another 
consideration, which I know will sink deep into the heart of every man from 
New York. It is an act of iuhospitality. (Cheers.) I trust, therefore, that, 
when this Convention shall proceed to ballot, there will at least be no 
manifestation winch shall not show that this Convention, and all who are 
about us, recognize in every man whose name shall be offered here a true, 
earnest, and honest man, whom we would all be glad to honor, though we 
are compelled to make a choice of but one. (Loud applause.) 

Mr. BiGLER, of Pennsylvania. — The first proceeding under the order of 
the Convention, already adopted, will be the nominating of the candidates 
of the Convention. 

Voices. — " No. no ! let us waive that." 

Mr. Cavanaugii, of Montana. —I send to the Chair, and desire to liave 
read, certain resolutions adopted last evening by all the delegates from all 
the Territories of the United States. 

Mr. Vallaxdigiiam. — I am obliged, reluctantly, to raise the point of order 
that the House is engaged in the performance of another duty, and the reso- 
lutions of the gentlemen are clearly not in order. 

The President. —The Chair is of opinion that the resolutions are not in 
order now, as the Convention is in the performance of another order. 

Mr. Cavanaugh. — May I ask a question? At what time may these reso- 
lutions be offered, if at all? 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. G5 

After consultation with several delegates, Mr. Cavanaugh with- 
drew the resolutions. 

Mr. Tildex. — I am desired to suggest to the Chair that it instruct the 
Secretary of the Convention, when any State shall give in its vote, to call 
back that vote, in order that there may be no misunderstanding or confusion. 

The President. — The Secretary will be so instructed. The Convention 
•will now proceed to name candidates. 

Mr. Thdrman, of Ohio. — I wish to say a word. The resolution of the 
gentleman from Pennsylvania was that this Convention do now proceed to 
nomiuate a President. That resolution was agreed to, a motion to recon- 
sider was made, and that resolution was laid on the table ; so there is nothing 
to do but to execute that order. One thing further : a resolution was passed 
yesterday that the friends of every candidate that should be presented to this 
Convention should pledge him and themselves to support the nomination 
that should be made. That would seem to require that the names of the can- 
didates should be presented, and the pledge should be given. 

The President. — The Chair understands that the resolution of the gentleman 
from Pennsylvania contemplated, and that it was the sense of the Convention, 
that we should now proceed to have the names of the candidates announced. 

Mr. Bigler, of Pennsylvania. — The resolution offered this morning had 
better be read. 

The resolution read as follows, — 

Resolved, That the Convention do now proceed to nominate a candidate 
for President of the United States. 

Mr. Bigler, of Pennsylvania. — That is a general order; under that order 
all the other forms that are necessary must be first adopted. We must have 
tellers, and then proceed to ballot. 

The Presidext. — How many tellers shall there be ? 

Mr. Brewer, of Pennsylvania. — I move that the Secretaries of the Con- 
vention act as tellers. 

Mr. Bigler. — How many Secretaries are there at the table ? 

The Secretary. — Four. 

Mr. Bigler. — I move that the Secretaries of the Convention act as tellers, 
and count all the votes that shall be given. 

The motion was agreed to. 

A delegate from Georgia complained that, owing to the confusion, 
delegates sitting near the doors leading into the hall could not hear 
a word. 

The Presidext. — The officers of the house will see that good order and 
quiet are observed. 

Mr. Muxro, of Nevada. — I have one question to ask, upon the answer to 
which may depend the course which this delegation will adopt in regard to 
the nomination of candidates. I ask that the President now state what his 
ruling will be after the closing of the naming of candidates here, — as to 
whether we can, at any time hereafter, bring forward any new candidate? 

The Presidext. — The Chair understands that this Convention has a right, 
at anv time, to bring forward any new candidate it may see fit. 
5 



CG OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

Mr. Dodge, of Ohio. — As a preliminary proceeding, I move that any dele- 
gate be now authorized to present the name of any candidate. 

Mr. Thurman, of Ohio. — I suggest to my colleague that his motion is en- 
tirely unnecessary. 

The President. — The Chair understands that when the Convention re- 
solved to go into the nomination of a candidate for President, they meant to 
do it in the usual and customary form. At all times it has been the practice^ 
of our Conventions to give delegates a chance to name their candidates, and 
the Chair will so hold unless objections are made. 

Mr. Thurman, of Ohio. — I ask the attention of the Chair to the resolution 
adopted yesterday : That when a delegate nominates a candidate, he pledge 
that candidate, and those who support him, to support the nominee of the 
Convention. He is required to do that by the resolution adopted yesterday. 

The President. — The Chair understands that that resolution was unani- 
mously adopted by the Convention, and that its members are so committed. 
How far candidates themselves may be regarded as pledged I do not know. 
But I sincerely hope that no doubt will linger in the mind of any delegate 
upon that subject, and that no one will suspect that any person who allows 
his name to be brought here as a candidate will not support the nominees of 
the Convention. (Cheers.) 

The Secretary read the resolution passed yesterdaj^, pledging re- 
jected candidates to support the nominee of the Convention. 

Mr. Tilden of New York. — It is the common law of the Democratic party 
that every candidate is so pledged; and I suggest that if any gentleman here 
proposes a candidate whom he does not deem to be so pledged, he should 
mention the exception. (Laughter.) 

The President. — The subject is disposed of. The roll of States will now 
be called, so that the delegates from each State will have an opportunity, if 
they see fit, to state what candidates they wish to present to the Convention. 

The Secretary called the name of Alabama. 

The Chairman of the Delegation. — Alabama makes no nomination. 

The Secretary called the name of Arkansas. 

The Chairman of the Delegation. — Arkansas makes no nomination. 

The Secretary called the name of California. 

Mr. Bigler. — California makes no nomination. 

The Secretary called the name of Connecticut. 
Mr. Eaton of Connecticut. — It will be remembered, sir — 
The President. — If the gentleman will give way a moment — The Chair 
understands that five, minutes is the time allowed to each delegation* 
to present a candidate. If that is the understanding of the Convention, 
the rule will be enforced. • 

Nomination of James E. English of Connecticut. 

Mr. Eaton of Connecticut. — It will be remembered that after passing 
through a terrible civil war, which lasted for four long and weary years, the 
clouds of despotism hung all over this broad land. All was gloom, all was 
darkness, all was desolation. At last, sir, there arose a star in the East, and 
my own gallant little commonwealth broke through the gloom and elected a 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 67 

Democratic Governor. (Cheers.) I know I do not say too much when I say 
that a thrill of joy ran all through the land at the news of that election. 
(Applause.) A year rolled around, and again, sir, the sterling and gallant 
Democracy of my little commonwealth elected the same man Governor. 
Mr. President, the State of Connecticut, the first State to vote Democratic 
after the war; the State of Connecticut, whose platform for the past ten years 
has always been a Democratic platform; the State of Connecticut, well 
knowing that she has but six votes to give here, that she is a small State, 
and that in all probability eminent and distinguished men of other States will 
be named, yet comes here and offers you as the standard-bearer of this great 
Confederacy of Commonwealths her own executive officer, — Connecticut 
names James E. English as her candidate. (Loud cheering.) 

The Secretary called the name of Delaware. 

The Chairman of the Delegation. — Delaware makes mo nomination. 

The Secretary called the name of Florida. 

The Chairman of the Delegation. — Florida makes no nomination. 

The Secretary called the name of Georgia. 

The Chairman of the Delegation. — Georgia makes no nomination. 

The Secretary called the name of Illinois. 

Mr. Richardson of Illinois. — The State of Illinois will cast her vote for 
Mr. Pendleton (Applause) ; but we leave it to the Ohio delegation to make 
the nomination. 

The Secretary called the name of Indiana. 

The Chairman of the Delegation. — The gentleman for whom the dele- 
gation of Indiana design to cast their vote has been already named to the 
Convention. 

The Secretary called the name of Iowa. 

The Chairman of the Delegation. — Iowa makes no nomination, but 
expects to sustain the nomination made by the State of Ohio. 

The Secretary called the name of Kansas. 

The Chairman of the Delegation. — Kansas makes no nomination. 

The Secretary called the name of Kentucky. 

The Chairman of the Delegation. — Kentucky makes no nomination. 

The Secretary called the name of Louisiana. 

The Chairman of the Delegation. — Louisiana makes no nomination. 

The Secretary called the name of Maine. 

Nomination of General Hancock. 

General Anderson of Maine. — I am directed by the majority of the Delegates 
from Maine to present to this body as a candidate, a gentleman, who, they 
believe, unites in himself all the best characteristics of the most available 
candidates, and who, if elected, would be able to discharge acceptably and 
as well as any other man in the country the duties of the chief executive 
office of the United States. I present a gentleman, who by his position 
during the past year has made a record that stands to-day high in the hearts 



68 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

of the whole American people; a gentleman who, appointed to a Military 
District of the United States, succeeding one who in that position had sub- 
ordinated his regard for the laws and the Constitution of the country, and his 
respect for the Chief Magistrate of the United States to his own ambitious 
longings for wealth and power, standing there as the representative of his 
Government, interposed the shield of the laws of the country between the 
tyranny of hard and petty tyrants, and an oppressed and outraged people 
(Applause) : a man, who by nature, gifted with a broad, comprehensive and 
discriminating intellect, educated in a school which taught him that the 
government was instituted to afford to its citizens the great cardinal rights 
of personal liberty, personal security, and the right to acquire and enjoy 
property, stood there and interposed, between the operations of the military 
government and the people who had been outraged and oppressed, the law 
that should accord to them those rights ; a gentleman who on another Held 
was one of the brave men in command of troops in the late contest, and 
united within himself the attributes of lion-hearted courage, and great mag-' 
nanimity, who fought well for the nation which placed him in command, but 
held forth the hand of mercy to the enemy when brought beneath his arms; 
a man who. ever foremost in the fight, held the plume aloft, which, like the 
helmet of Navarre, was always the oriflamme under which his troops went on 
either to honorable death or glorious victory. With these words it would 
seem almost superfluous to give the name; but I will nominate General Win- 
field Scott Hancock. (Great cheering.) 

Nomination of George H. Pendleton, of Ohio. 

Mr. Emory of Maine. — In behalf of what now constitutes the minority, but 
what I have reason to believe will constitute a majority of the Maine delega- 
tion, and in behalf of the laboring masses of Maine, who look to the action 
of this Convention to relieve them from the burden of debt and taxation 
under which they are now groaning, I nominate as their choice the Hon. 
GEORGE II. Pendleton, of Ohio. (Prolonged applause.) 

The Secretary called the name of Maryland. 
The Chairman of the Delegation. — Maryland makes no nomination. 
The Secretary called the name of Massachusetts. 
The Chairman of the Delegation. — The State of Massachusetts presents 
no name at this time. 

The Secretary called the name of Michigan. 

The Chairman of the Delegation. — Michigan makes no nomination at this 
time. 

The Secretary called the name of Minnesota. 

The Chairman of the Delegation. — Minnesota makes no nomination at this 
time. 

The Secretary called the name of Mississippi. 

The Chairman of the Delegation. —Mississippi makes no nomination. 

The Secretary called the name of Missouri. 

The Chairman of the Delegation. — Missouri makes no nomination. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 69 

The Secretary called the name of Nebraska. 

The Chairman of the Delegation. — Nebraska makes no nomination, but 
will cast her vote for George H. Pendleton. 

The Secretary called the name of Nevada. 

The Chairman of the Delegation. — Nevada makes no nomination. 

The Secretary called the name of New Jersey. 

Nomination of Governor Joel Parker, of New Jersey. 

Mr. Little, of New Jersey. — Mr. President, the State of New Jersey- 
nominates ex-Governor Joel Parker. (Cheers.) He has a national reputa- 
tion. During the late war he sustained the general government with all the 
force at his command, but at no time did he permit the Federal power to 
make any encroachment upon the rights of the State. He is a man who will 
receive, as we believe, every Democratic and Conservative vote in the coun- 
try. He is the soldiers' friend; he is the champion of State rights; he be- 
longs to a State that at one time had the only Democratic Governor in all 
the North ; he belongs to a State that elected a Democratic Governor in the 
midst of the war. I will not detain the Convention by any further expres- 
sion as to his merits, claims, or qualifications. His record is his highest 
praise. 

The Secretary called the State of New York. 

Nomination of Sanford E. Church. 

Mr. Samuel J. Tilden. — The State of New York, by the unanimous vote of 
her delegation, nominates to this Convention oue of her own most distin- 
guished citizens ; a gentleman honorably associated with her public offices 
for many years past; trained and experienced in executive administration, of 
decisive and energetic will ; a gentleman who has been repeatedly submitted 
to the ordeal of a popular vote iu the State of New York, and has always 
come from the trial with distinguished success, and who, if he should be the 
nominee of this Convention, would help us to achieve in this State a more 
brilliant triumpli than any we have ever yet accomplished: a gentleman 
whom the delegation can cordially and sincerely recommend to the Conven- 
tion and the country as fit in all respects to fulfil the greatest civic trust in 
the world — the chief magistracy of our great republic (Cheers) ; and who, 
as a candidate, would be unassailable and available. The delegation from 
the State of New York submits to this Convention the name of Sanford E. 
Church, of New York. (Great cheering.) 

The Secretary. — The State of New York nominates Sanford E. Church. 
(Applause.) 

The Secretar}^ called the State of South Carolina. 

The Chairman of the delegation, Mr. Perry. — The State of South Caro- 
lina makes no nomination. 

The Secretary called the State of Ohio. 

General McCook. — Mr. President, Ohio, by the unanimous vote of her 
Convention, places in nomination the name of George H. Pendleton, of 
Ohio. (Loud cheering.) 



70 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

The Secretary called Oregon. 

The Chairman of the Delegation, Mr. Bristow. — Oregon will make no 
nomination, but will cast its vote for George H. Pendleton. (Applause.) 

The Secretary called the name of Pennsylvania. 

Judge Woodward. — Mr. President, by a unanimous vote of the delegation 
of which I have the honor to be the organ, I am instructed to place before 
the Convention the name of an honored citizen of the State of Pennsyl- 
vania as a candidate for the office of President of the United States. Be- 
fore I pronounce his name, I beg leave to submit a few observations in 
reference to our nominee. An impression has gained currency that the dele- 
gation intends only a personal compliment to their fellow-citizen, and that 
thej' do not name him with an earnest purpose of making him a Presidential 
candidate. Sir, this is a mistake. The delegation intends no mere personal 
compliment, but a bona fide nomination. Their favorite needs no compli- 
ments, and desires none. If his countrymen think he can be useful to them 
in the highest office in their gift, he will do his best to serve them acceptably • 
but if they prefer another before him, no man will yield a more hearty and 
cheerful support to whomsoever .you may nominate. In this hour of 
great national peril, the Pennsylvania delegation feel that it is their 
duty to bring their best offering and lay it upon the altar of our common 
country. We make the offering with a profound impression of all the 
solemn obligations of the occasion. It is the best we have to present, 
and, if accepted, we believe it will prove a present and lasting blessing 
to our beloved country. We make the nomination in good earnest, but 
with great deference to the opinions and preferences of others ; and we 
hereby declare our purpose to stand by and support our nominee until a full 
opportunity shall have been given to other delegations to rally to his stand- 
ard. Our candidate, if not well known to the nation at large, is well 
known to the people of Pennsylvania, and will be supported by them with an 
enthusiasm which no other name can inspire. Born in Connecticut, and 
reared in the honorable calling of a carpenter, he came, early in life, to 
Pennsylvania, where, by patient industry, by judicious adaptation of the best 
means to the best ends, and by uniform good living, he acquired the confi- 
dence of his fellow-citizeus, and lifted himself from the poverty in which 
he was cradled into great prosperity aud affluence. He stands to-day 
among the men who have the deepest stake in the material wealth of the 
nation. He is one of the largest tax-payers in the country. (Applause.) 
Our delegation are very far from considering mere wealth a qualification 
for office, but when great wealth has been acquired, not by inheritance, nor 
by speculation, and still less by peculation and fraud, but by honest indus- 
try, by frugality of living, by following the dictates of a sound judgment 
and a clear understanding, its possession is proof of an organization and 
administrative intellect capable of, and fitted for, high duties in any sphere of 
life. The qualities of manhood are well marked by the uses to which indi- 
vidual wealth is devoted. In the instance which I am about to place before 
the Convention, wealth has not been hoarded, nor hid under a bushel, nor 
wasted in riotous living, nor squandered on schemes of folly and extrava- 
gance, but it has been employed in clearing out aud improving farms, de- 
veloping and working coal mines, building and conducting railroads, estab- 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 71 . 

lishing furnaces, foundries, and manufactories, and in founding the Lehigh 
University, — a grand seat of Christian education, and the only institution of 
learning in our country that has ever been fully endowed, from its start, by 
Individual munificence. If our candidate has not filled the noisy trump of 
fame, these are the trophies which he has won in the battle of life. He has 
not gashed the b«som of the earth to make millions of graves for his fellow- 
men ; but he has given employment to the idle, homes to the houseless, bread 
to the hungry, and clothing to the naked. He has not filled the land with 
widows and orphans ; but widows and orphans have shared his bounties, and 
the blessing of the widow's God has descended upon his basket and his 
store. For many years he has been a foremost man among those enterpris- 
ing benefactors of our race, who are pushing railroads into every part of our 
extensive country. Railroads are the grandest achievement of modern 
civilization. They are the highways of the million. They carry pop- 
ulation into our remote lands; the}' buildup towns and cities in what 
had else been the waste places of the earth; they diffuse intelligence, 
comfort, and cheerful wealth, broadcast, and they bring back to the sea- 
board cities the products of the forest, the farm, the mine, and the indus- 
tries of interior communities. The plauniug, constructing, and manag- 
ing of a system of connected railroads in so rugged a country as Pennsyl- 
vania, adapting them to the heavy tonnage of coal and iron, and to the quick 
transportation of passengers, and making them profitable to stockholders, as 
well as beneficial to the public, are labors that demand high qualities of mind, 
and bear loud testimony to the fitness of our candidate to grapple with compli- 
cated problems and to bring them to sound practical solutions. 

Voices. — " Time." 

The President. — The time allotted has already expired, but I trust the 
gentleman will be allowed to proceed and finish his remarks. 

Cries of " Go on, go on." 

Judge "Woodwakd concluded as follows, — 

A good business man is what the nation now needs at its head. Orators 
and warriors are useful in proper places, but through the incompetency and 
mismanagement of the men who have ruled the country for seven years, 
debt, taxes, confusion, frauds, and embarrassments of all sorts, have been 
brought upon us which threaten our utter ruin, and which only a practical 
wisdom, that has been trained in the business of life, can avert and alleviate. 
A man so trained does Pennsylvania this day present. The forces of his 
character are quiet and noiseless, like those better forces of nature which 
ripen the grain fields and the orchards, and which bear fruits that are " pleas- 
ant to the eye and good for food." If there is no brilliance to attract the 
public gaze to him, there is a pure, solid character, upon which we may build 
as upon a sure foundation. A Democrat all his life, a Representative in two 
successive Congresses, an Associate Judge for five years, a communicant of 
the Protestant Episcopal Church, a man whose integrity has never been ques- 
tioned, whose big heart embraces all his counti-ymen, and whose liberal hand 
is ever open to suffering humanity; such is the man Pennsylvania is proud 
to present for the consideration of his countrymen. It is a rule of Divine 
equity that he who has been faithful over a few things, shall be made a ruler 
over many things. Accept our candidate, sir, and you may count his major- 



72 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

ity in the old Keystone State 03' tens of thousands. Elect him President, and 
the thieves and gamblers will no longer seek office, but only hiding-places 
from the vigilance of a virtuous Executive, and the Republic will feel the 
instinct of a new life. Pennsylvania nominates for the next President of 
the United States, the Hon. Asa Packer. (Applause.) 

The Secretary called the State of Rhode Island. 

The Chairman of the Delegation. — The State of Rhode Island makes no 
nomination. 

The Secretary called the State of South Carolina. 

The Chairman of the Delegation. — The State of South Carolina makes no 
nomination. 

The Secretary called the State of Tennessee. 

Nomination of President Johnson. 

Mr. Thomas A. R. Nelson, on behalf of the Tennessee delegation, 
responded as follows, — 

I am instructed by the Tennessee delegation to present to this Con- 
vention a gentleman whose name is well known to the members of the 
Convention, to the people of the United States, and to the civilized world. I 
am directed to present the name of one who for thirty-three years was asso- 
ciated with the Democratic party, and is devoted to the maintenance and 
support of Democratic principles, — one whose life and position is an exempli- 
fication of the true equality of American institutions; one who, springing 
from poverty and obscurity, has obtained the highest office within the gift 
of the people; one who has engaged in the mightiest political contest that our 
nation ever saw (Cheers) ; one who was in favor of the Union in times 
that tried men's souls, and who was devoted to its support when the Union 
needed strength ; one who, after his elevation to the Presidency, has been 
maligned, calumniated, traduced, vilified, and persecuted by the Radical 
party ; one who has stood up nobly to the principles of the Constitution, and 
who has exemplified the principles that are announced in our declaration of 
principles to-day: one who has battled for the Constitution against the efforts 
of those who have attempted to destroy it; who has stood up for the rights 
of the Executive and Judicial departments against the tyrannical usurpations 
of Congress: one who has nobly borne himself in this contest while he has 
filled the place which was assigned him by the American people ; one who has 
ever been faithful among the faithless ; who, chosen by the people, has ever 
had their dearest interests at heart (Cheers) ; one who deserves the con- 
fidence of the whole American people, and will faithfully discharge, in time 
to come, as he has done in times past, the duties which they have imposed 
upon him. I am directed to present to the members of this Convention the 
name of Andrew Johnson, of Tennessee. (Enthusiastic cheering.) 

The Secretary called the State of Texas. 

The Chairman of the delegation. — The State of Texas makes no nomina- 
tion. 

The Secretaiy called the State of Vermont. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 73 

Mr. H. B. Smith, on behalf of the delegation, said, — 
Veimiont presents no new candidates, but her representatives here will 
cast their votes as a unit for the only Democratic Governor in New England- 
Vermont will vote for James E. English. (Applause.) 

The Secretary called the State of Virginia. 

Mr. John B. Baldwin, on behalf of the delegation, responded as 
follows, — 

The State of Virginia presents no nomination ; but, true to her ancient 
history, she accepts and will cordially support, as her first choice, the nomi- 
nee of this Convention. (Applause.) 

The Secretary called the State of "West Virginia. 

Mr. Benjamin H. Smith, chairman of the delegation, responded as 
follows, — 

West Virginia makes no nomination, but pledges herself to the support of 
George H. Pendleton. (Cheers.) 

The Secretary called the State of Wisconsin. 

Nomination of James jB. Doolittle. 

Mr. S. Clark, on behalf of the delegation, said, — 

The delegates from the State of Wisconsin were instructed by the State 
Convention that sent them here to vote as a ufiit. A majority of that dele- 
gation, controlling the vote of that State, will present to this Convention the 
name of one of her most distinguished citizens, — a gentleman whose repu- 
tation is so world-wide that no eulogy from myself or any other delegate can 
add a particle to his laurels, — a gentleman who separated himself from the 
Eepublican party when it was in the zenith of its glory and power through- 
out the country and throughout his own State, sacrificing thereby his own 
personal and political ambition for the good of his country and for the pres- 
ervation of the Constitution and the liberties of the people. I am directed 
to present the name of Hon. James R. Doolittle. (Loud cheers.) 

Mr. Henry L. Palmer. — The delegation from Wisconsin has good-naturedly 
differed in regard to the candidate for the Presidency. The majority has 
very properly presented the name of the distinguished citizen from our own 
State. I am, however, instructed by the minority of that delegation to 
second the nomination of a gentleman who has never been out of the Demo- 
cratic party— the Hon. George H. Pendleton. (Applause.) 

Nominations. 

The Secretary announced the following candidates as having been 
put in nomination, — 

James E. English, of Connecticut ; George H. Pendleton, of Ohio ; Joel Par- 
ker, of New Jersey; Sauford E. Church, of New York; Asa Packer, of Penn- 
sylvania; Andrew Johnson, of Tennessee; James E. Doolittle, of Wisconsin. 

The following is a table of candidates nominated, — 

Alabama. 8 — No nomination. 
Arkansas, 5 — No nomination. 
California. 5 — No nomination. 



74 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

Connecticut, G — James E. English. 

Delaware, 3 — No nomination. 

Florida, 3 — No nomination. 

Georgia, 9 — No nomination. 

Illinois, 16 — No nomination. 

Iowa, 8 — No nomination. 

Kansas, 3 — No nomination. 

Kentucky, 11 — No nomination. 

Louisiana, 7 — No nomination. 

Maine, 7 — Wiufield Scott Hancock; minority nominated George H. Pen- 
dleton. 

Maryland, 7 — No nomination. 

Massachusetts, 12 — No nomination. 

Michigan, 8 — No nomination. 

Minnesota, 4 — No nomination. 

Mississippi, 7 — No nomination. 

Missouri, 11 —No nomination. 

Nebraska, 3 — No nomination. 

Nevada, 3 — No nomination. 

New Hampshire, 5 — No nomination. 

New Jersey, 7 — Ex-Governor Joel Parker. 

New York, 33 — Sanford E. Church. 

North Carolina, 9 — No nomination. 

Ohio, 21 — George H. Pendleton. 

Oregon, 3 — George EL Pendleton. 

Pennsylvania, 2G — Asa Packer. 

lthode Island, 4 — No nomination. 

South Carolina, 6 — No nomination. 

Tennessee, 10 — Andrew Johnson. 

Texas, 6 — No nomination. 

Vermont, 5 — James E. English. 

Virginia, 10 — No nomination. 

"West Virginia, 5 — No nomination. 

Wisconsin, 8 — James E. Doolittle; minority, George H. Pendleton. 

Mr. Miller, of Pennsylvania. — I move that the Convention now proceed 
to ballot. 

The President. — The Chair understands that the custom has been for the 
Secretary to call the roll. The several delegations then give in their votes to 
the Chair through their chairman. If any time is required, five or ten min- 
utes for this purpose will be allowed, if there is no objection. 

Mr. Cavanaugh, of Montana. — Will it now be in order to offer a resolu- 
tion? 

The President. — The Chair understands that the Convention has already 
decided that it will not give votes to delegates from the Territories. 

Mr. Cavanaugh. — The delegates from these Territories respectfully pre- 
sent a resolution that ought to go upon the record. Do not let this Conven- 
tion act like the Radical Congress. 

Cries of " Order." 

The President. — The gentleman is not in order. The Secretary will call 
the roll. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 75 

Mr. Cavanaugii. —I appeal from the decision of the Chair. 

Mr. Vallandigham. — An appeal is not in order. 

The President. — The clerk will proceed with the call. The chairmen.of 
the respective delegations from each of the States, as they are called, will 
rise in their places and name the man and the number of votes of the dele- 
gation. 

The Secretary called the roll as follows, — 

First Ballot. 

Alabama. — The Chairman of the Delegation : The State of Alabama casts 
her eight votes for Andrew Johnson, of Tennessee. 

Arkansas.— The Chairman of the Delegation: The State of Arkansas casts 
her five votes for James E. English, of Connecticut. 

California. — The Chairman of the Delegation : California asks to pass her 
vote. 

Connecticut. — The Chairman of the Delegation : Connecticut casts her six 
votes for James E. English. 

Delaware. — The Chairman of the Delegation : Delaware has the honor to 
cast her three votes for that illustrious Buckeye statesman, George H. Pen- 
dleton. 

Florida. — The Chairman of the Delegation : Florida casts her three elec- 
toral votes for Andrew Johnson, of Tennessee. 

Georgia. — The Chairman of the Delegation : Georgia casts her nine votes 
for Andrew Johnson, of Tennessee. 

Illinois. — The Chairman of the Delegation : Illinois casts her vote for 
George H. Pendleton. 

Iowa. — The Chairman of the Delegation : The State of Iowa casts her eight 
votes for George H. Pendleton, of Ohio. 

Kansas. — The Chairman of the Delegation : The State of Kansas casts two 
votes for George H. Pendleton ; one-half vote for Thomas Hendricks, and one- 
half vote for Frank P. Blair. 

Kentucky. — The Chairman of the Delegation : The State of Kentucky casts 
her eleven votes for George H. Pendleton. 

Louisiana. — The Chairman of the Delegation: The State of Louisiana 
casts her votes for Gen. W. S. Hancock. 

Maine. — The Chairman of the Delegation : The State of Maine casts 
four and a half votes for W. S. Hancock, one and a half for George II. Pen- 
dleton, one for Andrew Johnson. 

Maryland. — The Chairman of the delegation : The State of Maryland casts 
four and a half votes for George H. Pendleton, two and a half for Andrew 
Johnson. 

Massachusetts. — The Chairman of the Delegation: The State of Massachu- 
setts casts eleven votes for Gen. Hancock, and one vote for George II. Pen- 
dleton, of Ohio. 

Michigan. — The Chairman of the Delegation : The State of Michigan casts 
her eight electoral votes for Reverdy Johnson, of Maryland. 

Minnesota. — The Chairman of the Delegation: Four votes for George H. 
Pendleton. 

Mississippi. — The Chairman of the Delegation : Mr. President, I am instruct- 
ed by the Mississippi Delegation to cast her nine votes for W. S. Hancock. 



76 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

Missouri. — The Chairman of the Delegation : The State of Missouri casts 
five votes for George II. Pendleton; one vote for S. E. Church, of New York; 
two and a half votes for Thomas Hendricks ; two and a half votes for Gen. 
Hancock ; and a half vote for Andrew Johnson, of Tennessee. 

A delegate from California here asked leave to cast the vote of 
that State, stating that some of the delegates were absent from the 
room when her name was called. 

The President. — The State of California will be again called when the 
roll of States has been gone through with. It greatly embarrasses the officers 
of the Convention and the reporters of the press to make announcements out 
of order. 

Nebraska. — The Chairman of the Delegation: The State of Nebraska casts 
her three votes for George H. Pendleton, of Ohio. (Applause.) 

Nevada. — The Chairman of the Delegation : The State of Nevada casts her 
three votes for ex-Governor Joel Parker, of New Jersey. 

New Hampshire. — The Chairman of the Delegation: The State of New 
Hampshire casts one vote for James R. Doolittle, two votes for Gen. Han- 
cock, and two votes for George H. Pendleton. 

New Jersey. — The Chairman of the Delegation : New Jersey casts her 
seven electoral votes for Joel Parker. (Cheers.) 

New York. — The Chairman of the Delegation: New York casts her thirty- 
three votes for Sanford E. Church. (Cheers.) 

North Carolina. — The Chairman of the Delegation : North Carolina casts 
nine votes for Andrew Johnson. (Cheers.) 

Ohio. — The Chairman of the Delegation: Ohio casts twenty-one votes for 
George H. Pendleton. (Cheers.) 

Oregon. — The Chairman of the Delegation: Oregon casts her three votes 
for George H. Pendleton. 

Pennsylvania. — The Chairman of the Delegation : Pennsylvania casts her 
twenty-six votes for Asa Packer. 

Bhode Island. — The Chairman of the Delegation : Rhode Island casts her 
four votes for James R. Doolittle. 

South Carolina. — The Chairman of the Delegation: The State of South 
Carolina casts her six votes for Andrew Johnson, of Tennessee. 

Tennessee. — The Chairman of the Delegation: The State of Tennessee 
casts her ten votes for Andrew Johnson. (Cheers.) 

Texas. — The Chairman of the Delegation : The State of Texas casts her 
six votes for Andrew Johnson, of Tennessee. 

Virginia. — The Chairman of the Delegation: Virginia casts her ten votes 
for Andrew Johnson, of Tennessee. (Cheers.) 

West Virginia. — The Chairman of the Delegation : The State of West Vir- 
ginia casts her five electoral votes for George H. Pendleton. 

Wisconsin. — The Chairman of the Delegation : The Delegates of the State 
of Wisconsin, under the instructions of our Convention, casts her eight votes 
for James R. Doolittle. 

California. — A Delegate : By direction of the Chairman of our Delegation, 
who is in ill health, I am instructed to cast, as the vote of California, three 
for Parker, of New Jersey, and two for Pendleton, of Ohio. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 



77 



The Secretary announced the vote as follows, — 

Whole number of votes' cast 317 

James E. English 16 

Winfleld S. Hancock 33£ 

George H. Pendleton ' 105 

Joel Parker 13 

Sanford E. Church 34 

Asa Packer 26 

Andrew Johuson 65 

James R. Doolittle 13 

Frank P. Blair, Jr £ 

Thomas A. Hendricks 2£ 

Reverdy Johnson 8h 



FIRST BALLOT — RECAPITULATION. 



STATES. 


© 

a 
o 


O 

Ei 

&3 

-J 

Ife 

ft. 


O 

< 


b 

s 


hi 


ftf 

ft? 
"Jl 


ft, 


i*5 







&3 

N 



N 
« 

fej 




B5 



1 

ft! 
O 
*s 

ft? 




8 
5 
5 
6 
3 
3 
9 

16 

13 
8 
3 

11 
7 
7 
7 

12 
8 
4 
7 

11 
3 
3 
5 
7 

33 
9 

21 
3 

26 
4 
6 

10 
6 
5 

10 
5 
8 

317 


2 
3 

16 
13 

8 
2 
11 

i| 

1 

4 

'5 
3 

2 

21 
3 

5 
105 


7 

11 

7 


2 
001 


i 
34 


5 

6 

5 
16 


3 

3 

'7 

13 


26 
26 


8 

3 
9 

1 

2| 

9 

6 

10 
6 

io 

65 


1 

4 

8 
13 


1 
5 

2 
2i 


5 

1 

3 














































8 












1 




2 


















Ohio 




































Total 


81 



78 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

The Secretary called the roll for the second ballot, as follows, — 

Second Ballot. 

Alabama. — Eight votes for A. Johnson. 

Arkansas. — One-half vote for J. E. English ; for Joel Parker, two and a 
half; for A. Johnsou, two. 

California. — Three votes for Joel Parker; two for A. Johnson. 
Connecticut. — Six votes for J. E. English. 
Delaware. —Three votes for G. H. Pendleton. 
Florida. — Three votes for A. Johnson. 

Georgia. — Eight and a half votes for A. Johnson ; for Thomas Ewing, Jr., 
one-half. 
Illinois. — Sixteen votes for G. H. Pendleton. 
Indiana. — Thirteen, votes for G. H. Pendleton. 
Iowa. —Eight votes for G. H. Pendleton. 

Kansas. — - Two votes for G. II. Pendleton; T. A. Hendricks, one-half; 
Frank Blair, one-half. 
Kentucky. — Eleven votes for G. H. Pendleton. 
Louisiana. — Seven votes for W. S. Hancock. 

Maine. — One and a half votes forG. H. Pendleton; for "W. P. Hancock, 
four and a half; for J. E. English, one. 

Maryland. — Four and a half votes for G. H. Pendleton ; for A. Johnson, two 
and a half. 
Massachusetts. — One vote forG. H. Pendleton; for W. S. Hancock, eleven. 
Michigan. —Eight votes for Reverdy Johnson. 
Minnesota. —Four votes for G. II. Pendleton. 
Mississippi. — Seven votes for W. S. Hancock. 

Missouri. —Five and a half votes for George II. Pendleton; for Gen. Han- 
cock, two votes; for Hendricks, one and a half; for Andrew Johnson, one 
and a half; and for James R. Doolittle, one-half. 
Nebraska. — Three votes for George H. Pendleton. 
X -rada. — Three votes for Joel Parker, of New Jersey. 
New Hampshire. — Two votes for George H. Pendleton, and three votes for 
Gen. Hancock. 
Neva Jersey-. — Seven votes for Joel Parker. 
Neva York. — Thirty-three votes for Sandford E. Church. 
Xorth Carolina. — Eight and a half votes for Andrew Johnson, and one-half 
vote for Pendleton. 

Ohio. — Twenty-one votes for George H. Pendleton. 

Oregon. —Three votes for Pendleton. 
Pennsylvania. — Twenty-six votes for Asa Packer. 
Bhode Island. — Four votes for James R. Doolittle. 

South Carolina. — Six votes for Andrew Johnson. 

Tennessee. — Ten votes for Andrew Johnson. 

Texas. — Six votes for Gen. Hancock. 

Vermont. — Five votes for James E. English. 

Virginia. — Ten votes for Frank P. Blair, of Missouri. (Applause.) 

West Virginia. — Five votes for George H. Pendleton. 

Wisconsin. — As before : eight votes for James R. Doolittle. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 



79 



The Secretary announced the second ballot, — 

The whole number of votes cast 317 

James E. English 124 

W. S. Hancock 404 

George H. Pendleton 104 

Joel Parker lo£ 

Sanford E. Church 33 

Asa Packer 26 

Andrew Johnson 52 

James R. Doolittle 12£ 

Thomas A. Hendricks 2 

Frank P. Blair, Jr 10£ 

Reverdy Johnson 8 

Thomas Ewiug 4 

SECOND BALLOT— RECAPITULATION. 



STATES. 


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5 


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to 


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tei 
o 


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13 


to 

--1 


a 
10 

101 


<5 



S 

8 
8 


©" 

| 

S4 




8 
5 
5 

3 
3 
9 
16 
13 
8 
3 
11 

7 
7 

12 
8 
4 
7 

11 
3 
3 
5 
7 

33 
9 

21 
3 

26 
4 
6 

10 
6 
5 

10 
5 
8 

317 


3 

in 

13 
8 
2 

11 

"n 

H 

i 

4 

*5i 
3" 

o 

5 

21 
3 

5 

104 


7 

11 

7 
2 

3 

6 
40.1 


33 
33 


6 
1 

5 

12* 


3 

7 

15| 


26 
26 


8 
2 
2 

3 

2£ 
14 

'k 

6 
10 

52 


1 

5 

4 

8 
12| 


2 
















Florida 






I 






































New Jersey 

New York" 
















Texas 




















Total 


i 



80 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

Mr. Scott, of Pennsylvania. — I move that we now adjourn until four 
o'clock this afternoon. • 

Mr. Vallandigham, of Ohio. — That motion is not in order. A motiou to 
adjourn carries the Convention over until ten o'clock to-morrow morning. 

The President. — The motion is not in order ; for, by the rule adopted by 
the Convention, a motion to adjourn carried the Convention over until ten 
o'clock the next day. 

Mr. Scott. — I withdraw the motion. 

Mr. Boyek, of Ohio. — I move that the Convention take a recess until four 
o'clock. 

The President put the motion to take a recess, and declared it lost. 
The States were then called in their order. Pending the vote, 
Judge Woodward, of Pennsylvania, said, — 

On behalf of Pennsylvania, I ask leave of the Convention for the delegation 
to retire for consultation. 

The President. — It will be granted unless objection be made. 

A Delegate. — I object. 

The President. — Objection being made, the question will be upon allow- 
ing the Pennsylvania delegation to retire for consultation. 

The question was put and leave was granted, a recess being taken 
to allow time for the delegation to retire. 

Third Ballot. 

The vote was then proceeded with, after recess, as follows, — 

Arkansas. — Four votes for F. P. Blair, one-half vote for Andrew Johnson, 
and one-half vote for James E. English. 

California. — Three votes for Parker, one for Pendleton, and one for Andrew 
Johnson. 

Connecticut. — Six votes for English. 

Delaware. — Three votes for G. H. Pendleton. 

Florida. — Three votes for Reverdy Johnson. 

Georgia. — Eight votes for Andrew Johnson, and one vote for Thomas 
Ewing, Jr., of Ohio. 

Illinois. —Thirteen votes for Pendleton. 

Iowa. — Eight votes for George H. Pendleton. 

Kansas. — Two votes for Pendleton, one-half vote for Thomas E. Hendricks, 
and one-half vote for Blair. 

Kentucky. — Eleven votes for George H. Pendleton. 

Louisiana. — Seven votes for Gen. Hancock. 

Maine. — Four and a half votes for Gen. Hancock, one and a half for Pen- 
dleton, and one for English. 

Maryland. — Five votes for Pendleton, and two for Andrew Johnson. 

Massachusetts. —Eleven votes for Gen. Hancock, and one for Pendleton. 

Michigan. — Eight votes for Eeverdy Johnson. 

Minnesota. — Four votes for Pendleton. 

dfississippi. — Seven votes for Gen. Hancock. 

3Iissouri. — Missouri casts five and a half votes for Pendleton, three and a 
half for Hendricks, one for Andrew Johnson, and one for Gen. Hancock. 

Nebraska. — Three votes for George H. Pendleton. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 81 

Nevada. — Two votes for Joel Parker, .and one for George H. Pendleton. 

New Jersey. — Seven votes for Joel Parker. 

New York. — Thirty-three votes for Sanford E. Church. 

New Hampshire. — One-half vote for Hendricks, one and a half for George 
H. Pendleton, and three for Hancock. 

South Carolina. — Six votes for Hancock, two for Pendleton, and one for 
Andrew Johnson. 

Ohio. — Twenty-one votes for George H. Pendleton. 

Oregon. — The Chairman of the Delegation: Oregon still casts her three 
votes for the Statesman of the West, the Herald of Victory — George H. Pen- 
dleton. (Applause i.nd laughter.) 

Pennsylvania. — The Secretary called the State of Pennsylvania; but there 
was no response. 

Iihode Island. — Four votes for James E. Doolittle. 

North Carolina. — Three votes for Andrew Johnson, two for Pendleton, and 
one for Parker. 

Tennessee. — Ten votes for Andrew Johnson. 

Texas. — Six votes for Hancock. 

Vermont. — Five votes for Thomas A. Hendricks. 

Virginia. — Ten votes for George H. Pendleton. 

West Virginia. — Five votes for George H. Pendleton. 

Wisconsin. — Eight votes for James R. Doolittle. 

Pennsylvania. — The Delegation from Pennsylvania at this point returned 
to the hall, and their chairman announced that Pennsylvania cast twenty-six 
votes for Asa Packer. 
6 



82 



OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 



The Secretary announced the result of the vote, as follows, - 

The whole number of votes cast 317 

James E. English 7£ 

W. S. Hancock 45£ 

George H. Pendleton 1194 

Joel Parker 13 

Sanford E. Church 33 

Asa Packer 26 

Andrew Johnson 34£ 

James R. Doolittle 12 

Thomas A . Hendricks 9i 

Frank P. Blair 4£ 

Reverdy Johnson 11 

Thomas Ewing 1 

THIRD BALLOT — RECAPITULATION. 



STATES. 


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as 


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3 


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© 


© 


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5 


$ 
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^ 
^ 


hi 

© 
8? 

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8 
5 
5 
(i 
3 

3 
9 
16 
13 

8 
3 

11 

7 
7 

U 
8 
4 
7 

11 
3 
3 
5 
7 

:;:; 
9 

21 
3 

26 
4 
6 

10 
6 
5 

10 
5 
8 

317 


5 

*6 

i 


ii 

*7 
1 

*3 



6 

45^ 


l 

a 

16 
13 

8 

11 

n 

5 
1 

4 

»5 

3 

1 

2 

21 

3 

2 

10 
5 

U0.i 


3 

7 
1 

13 


33 
33 


26 
26 


8 

3 
1 

8 

1 

1 

3 

10 

34J 


4 

8 
12 


i 


4 
i 

4| 


3 

8 

11 




< lOmiecticut 




< reorgia 


'i 


Indiana 




,. , 












Massachusetts 




Missouri 




New York 

North Carolina 








Rhode Island 

South Carolina 

Tennessee 


















i 







NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 83 

Fourth Ballot. 

The Secretary again called the roll, as follows, — 

Alabama. — Eight votes for Andrew Johnson. 

Arkansas. — Two and a half votes for Pendleton, one and a half for Frank 
P. Blair, one and a half for Andrew Johuson, and one-half vote for 
English. 

California. — Three votes for Parker, one for Johnson, and one for 
Pendleton. 

Delaware. — Three votes for George H. Pendleton. 

Florida. — Three votes for Hancock. 

Georgia. — Eight votes for Andrew Johnson, one for Ewing. 

Illinois. — Sixteen votes for Pendleton. 

Indiana. — Thirteen votes for George H. Pendleton. 

Iowa. — Eight votes for Pendleton. 

Kansas. — Two votes for Pendleton, one-half for Hendricks, and one-half 
for Blair. 

Kentucky. — Eleven votes for Pendleton. 

Louisiana. — Seven votes for Hancock. 

M tine. — Four and a half votes for Hancock, one and a half for Pendleton, 
and one for Hendricks. 

Maryland. — Five votes for Pendleton, one and a half for Andrew Johnson, 
and one-half for Hendricks. 

Massachusetts — Eleven votes for Hancock, one for Pendleton. 

Michigan. — Eight votes for Reverdy Johnson. 

Minnesota. — Four votes for Pendleton. 

Mississippi. — Seven votes for Hancock. 

Missouri. — Five votes for Pendleton, two for Hancock, and four for 
Hendricks. 

Nebraska. — Three votes for Pendleton. 

Nevada. — Three votes for Joel Parker. 

New Hampshire. — Haifa, vote for Hendricks, one and a half for Pendleton, 
and three for Hancock. 

Neio Jersey. — Seven votes for Parker. 

New York. — Thirty-five votes for Sanford E. Church. 

North Carolina. — The Chairman of the Delegation: Nine votes for 
Horatio Seymour. (Loud and enthusiastic cheering, participated in by the 
galleries.) 

Mr. Tildex. — Mr. President, I shall give notice if there is any cheering 
in the galleries in respect to the candidates whose names are mentioned here, 
that I shall move to clear the galleries. 

Mr. Richardson, of Illinois. — I move to clear them now. 

A Delegate from Michigan. — I suggest to the gentleman from Illinois 
(Mr. Richardson) that the intimation is sufficient, if he will withdraw his 
motion. 

Mr. Richardson. — Certainly I will withdraw my motion. 

The Puesidext (Mr. Seymour).— I trust I may be permitted now to make 
a single remark. Very much to m\ r surprise, my name has been mentioned. 
1 must not be nominated by this Convention. I could not accept its nomina- 
tion if tendered, which I do not expect. My own inclinations prompted me 



84 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

to decline at the outset; my honor compels me to do so now. I am grateful 
for any expression of kindness. But I trust it will be distinctly understood 
that it is impossible, consistent with my position, to allow my name to be 
mentioned in this Convention against my protest. The Clerk will proceed 
with the call. 

The Secretary then resumed the call, as follows, — 
Ohio. — Twenty-one votes for George H. Pendleton. 
Oregon. — Three votes for Pendleton. 
Pennsylvania. — Twenty-six votes for Packer. 
Bhode Island. — Four votes for Doolittle. 

South Carolina. — Three votes for Andrew Johnson, two for Pendleton, and 
one for English. 

Tennessee. — Ten votes for Andrew Johnson. 
Texas. — Six votes for Hancock. 
Vermont. — Five votes for Thomas A. Hendricks. 
Virginia — Ten votes for George H. Pendleton. 
West Virginia. — Five votes for Pendleton. 
Wisconsin. — Eight votes for James R. Doolittle. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 



85 



The Secretary announced the result, as follows, — 

Whole number of votes cast 317 

English 7£ 

Hancock 43£ 

Pendleton n&k 

Parker 13 

Church 33 

Packer 26 

A. Johnson 32 

Doolittle 12 

Hendricks ll£ 

Blair 2 

Reverdy Johnson 8 

Ewing 1 

Seymour 9 



FOURTH BALLOT — RECAPITULATION. 



STATES. 


6 

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hi 
S3 


M 
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o 

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Q 
tei 


ft? 

ft? 


hi 


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fca 
tq 


£5 


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e 

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N 

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O 


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ft? 

g 


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tei 



% 
fc| 



«? 


| 

ft) 


«3 




8 
5 
5 
6 
.3 
3 
9 

16 

13 
8 
3 

11 
7 
7 
7 

12 
8 
4 
7 

11 
3 
3 
5 
7 

33 
9 

21 
3 

26 
4 
6 

10 
6 
5 

10 
5 
8 

317 


2 

6 
1 


3 

"? 

4| 

ii 

'7 
2 

3 

6 
43£ 


21 
1 

3 
10 

13 

8 

11 

lj 

5 

1 

4 

5 

3 

21 
3 

2 

10 
5 

118J 


3 

7 
13 


33 
33 


26 
26 


8 
1 

8 
Is 

3 

10 

32 


4 

8 
12 


2 

1 

2 

4 

2 

5 


1 
2 

2 


8 
8 


1 
1 








Delaware 

Florida 


.'. 


Illinois 




Indiana 
























Nebraska 








New York 


9 


Ohio 




Pennsylvania 


















., 




9 



86 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

A Delegate from Indiana. — Mr. President, the name of one of the 
most talented and respected citizens of Indiana has been presented here, out- 
side of the delegation from that State, and with respectable strength. It 
presents a subject, therefore, of grave deliberation upon the part of the dele- 
gation from that State, and I am requested by many of the delegates to ask 
the Convention for permission to retire for the purpose of deliberation. 

Permission being granted, the delegation withdrew from the hall. 

Mr. Faulkner, of New York, moved that the Convention adjourn 
until six o'clock this afternoon. 

The President. — The Chair understands from the Secretary that the res- 
olution respecting adjournments, already adopted by the Convention, pro- 
vides that when the Convention adjourns, it shall adjourn until ten o'clock 
to-morrow morning. The only way, therefore, to act upou the wish of the 
delegate from New York, is to take a recess. 

A Delegate from New York. — I move, then, that the Convention take a 
reeess until four o'clock this afternoon. 

A Delegate from Nebraska. —I move to amend by taking a recess until 
seven o'clock this evening. 

Neither amendment nor resolution was agreed to. 

A Delegate from Kansas. — I move the Convention do now adjourn. 

The motion was lost. 

Fifth Ballot. 

The Secretary again called the roll, with the following result, — 

Alabama. — Eight votes for Andrew Johnson. 

California. — Three votes for Asa Packer, one for Andrew Johnson, and one 
for George II. Pendleton. 

Connecticut. — Six votes for James E. English. 

Delaware. — Three votes for George H. Pendleton. 

Florida. — Three votes for James 11. Doolittle. 

Illinois. — Sixteen votes for George H. Pendleton. 

Iowa. — Eight votes for George II. Pendleton. 

Kansas. — Two votes for George II. Pendleton, one-half for Thomas H. 
Hendricks, and one-half for F. P. Blair, Jr. 

Kentucky. — Eleven votes for George H. Pendleton. 

Louisiana. — Seven votes for Wiufield S. Hancock. 

Maine. — Four and a half votes for Hancock, one and a half for Pendleton, 
and one for Hendricks. 

Maryland. — Five votes for George H. Pendleton, one for Hendricks, and 
one for Andrew Johnson. 

Massachusetts. — Eleven votes for W. S. Hancock, and one for George H. 
Pendleton. 

Michigan. — Eight votes for Mr. Hendricks, of Indiana. 

Minnesota. — Four votes for George H. Pendleton. 

Mississippi. — Seven votes for Winfleld S. Hancock. 

Missouri. — Five and a half votes for George H. Pendleton, two for W. S. 
Hancock, aud three and a half for Hendricks. 

Nebraska. — Three votes for George H. Pendleton. 

Nevada. — Three votes for Parker. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. hi 

New Hampshire — One-half vote for Thomas A. Hendricks, one and a half 
for Pendleton, and three votes for W. S. Hancock. 

New Jersey. — Seven votes for Joel Parker. 

New York. — Thirty-three votes for Sauford E. Church. 

North Carolina. — Five and a half votes for Hancock, two and a half for 
Pendleton, and one for Packer. 

Ohio. — Twenty-one votes for Pendleton. 

Oregon. — Three votes for Pendleton. 

Pennsylvania. — Twenty-six votes for Packer. 

Rhode Island. — Pour votes for Doolittle. 

South Carolina. — Three votes for Andrew Johnson, two for Pendleton, 
and one for John Quincy Adams, of Massachusetts. 

Tennessee. — Ten votes for Andrew Johnson. 

Texas. — Six votes for Hancock. 

Vermont. — Five votes for Thomas A. Hendricks. 

Virginia. — Ten votes for Pendleton. 

West Virginia. — Five votes for Pendleton. 

Wisconsin. — Eight votes for Doolittle. 

Georgia. — Nine votes for Frank P. Blair. 

Arkansas. — Three votes for Pendleton, one for Andrew Johnson, and one 
for English. 

Executive Committee. 

During the recess the Secretary said, — 

I have to request that the delegations that have appointed members of the 
Executive Committee will please pass them up to the President's table, on 
slips of paper, with the post-office address, giving their States. 

Mr. Bradford, of Delaware. — I think the resolution was that a Committee 
should be appointed, one from each State, to name them. 

The President. — The delegates from each State select their own repre- 
sentatives. 

Mr. Wright, of Delaware. — I offered that resolution. It was to select one 
from each State to form a National Executive Committee. 

Mr. Richardson, of Illinois. — If the Convention will give me their atten- 
tion for half a moment, I will say a word in regard to the Territories. 
Probably in four years from now most of them will be States in the Union. 
I am for giving them some encouragement, and I desire to make this prop- 
osition to the Committee: that they be permitted to appoint upon the 
National Executive Committee a member from each of the Territories of the 
United States. 

Mr. Hart, of New York. — I move to lay that resolution on the table. 

The motion was lost. 

Mr. Tare-ill, of Ohio. — I move to amend the resolution so as to make it 
include the District of Columbia, 

Gen. McCook, of Ohio. — The District of Columbia is not a State yet, and 
it is not represented on this floor. 

Mr. D. O. Finch, of Iowa. — I am in favor of the original proposition, for 
the reason that the Territories in four years, in all probability, will be States, 
while the District of Columbia never can be ; therefore the amendment should 
be voted down. 



88 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

A vote being taken on the amendment, it was declared lost. 

The question was then stated to be on the resolution of the gentle- 
man from Illinois, to add to the National Executive Committee one 
member from each of the Territories. 

Mr. Buel, of Nevada. — I would desire briefly to call attention to the fact 
that there is territory enough on the other side of the mountains, out of 
which, we hope, within the next year, at least, to carve ten States. The 
population of all those Territories are thoroughly Democratic, even including 
my own friend Brigham Young and his people of Utah. (Laughter.) Now, 
sir, I don't see the justice of excluding those gentlemen from representation 
on this committee. This committee is to remain in power for four years. 
We will have at least four Democratic States in that portion of the country 
before the expiration of four years. I hope gentlemen will reflect a moment 
before that is voted down. These men have risked their lives in the settle- 
ment of this country, and they carried the faith of their fathers there. 

Mr. Tilden, of New York. — Nothing could give us of the large States more 
pleasure than to do anything that is reasonable for our friends of the Territo- 
ries ; but in the Constitution of the Executive Committee and the discharge 
of its important functions, it is enough that a State of 4,000,000 like New 
York should be neutralized by the small States of the Union. It is enough 
that a small State of the Union should neutralize Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, 
Illinois. Let us not add to that inequality by the introduction of delegates 
into that committee from the Territories having a very small population, 
who will have an equal influence upon the action of the Democratic party, 
voting as they do on that committee with these great and populous States. 
I do not think the request is reasonable ; therefore I move to lay the motion 
on the table. 

The President. — The motion of the gentlemau from New York is not in 
order, as a similar one has just been voted down. 

Mr. Tildex. — I move to postpone it indefinitely. 

The Presidext. — The Chair will first present a resolution that has been 
offered by Mr. Riley, of Pennsylvania, by way of amendment. 

The resolutions were read as follows, — 

Resolved, That the representation of the next National Convention shall be 
the same as now. 

Resolved, That in the event of any new State being admitted, any person 
who shall be named by the regular Democratic organization of the State 
shall be recognized as a member of the National Executive Committee. 

Resolved, That the place of holding the next National Convention shall be 
left at the discretion of the National Executive Committee. 

The amendment was accepted by Mr. Richardson. 

The Secretary announced that the only resolution to be voted on 
was as follows, — 

Resolved, That in the event of any new State being admitted, any person 
who shall be named by the regular Democratic organization of the State shall 
be recognized as a member of the National Executive Committee. 

The Chair held the rest of the resolution to be unnecessary and 

out of order. 

The resolution was agreed to. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 89 

Mr. White, of Maryland. — I move that a committee of three be appointed 
by this Convention to wait upou the Indiana delegation and inquire if there 
is any probability of their immediately returning to the Convention, and, if 
not, that the Convention take a recess. 

The motion was agreed to. 

The Chair appointed Messrs. White (Md.), Faulkner (N. Y.), and 
Kerr (Penn.), as the committee. 

Mr. Fayette McMullen, of Virginia. — Mr. President, it must be per- 
fectly obvious to this Convention now that we can do little, if anything, 
until we have retired and taken some refreshment. I have been most patient 
here; and no gentleman from my State, or scarcely from any other Southern 
State, has opened his mouth. I only rise now for the purpose of submitting 
a motion that I hope will meet the unanimous concurrence of this body, to 
wit, that we take a recess until five o'clock. 

Mr. Strain, of Pennsylvania, seconded the motion. 

The President. — Mr. Nelson, of Tennessee, calls the attention of the Chair 
to the fact that yesterday this Convention passed a resolution inviting a 
delegation from the State of Tennessee to submit to this body a memorial of 
the wrongs suffered by that State. The resolution was adopted, and the 
gentleman asks that Mr. McMullen will withdraw his resolution for the pur- 
pose of permitting that committee to be heard at this time. 

Mr. McMullen. — Mr. President, Tenuessee is my neighbor ; I cannot 
withhold any courtesy asked for by that State. I therefore withdraw my 
motion with great pleasure, but with the understanding that it is to be re- 
newed when the memorial shall have been preseuted. 

Mr. F. W. Brown, of Tennessee, then submitted to the Conven- 
tion the following 

Memorial. 

To the National Democratic Convention assembled in New York, July 4th, 1868, 
for the purpose of restoring the rights of States, and re-establishing the an- 
cient liberties of the Bepublic. 

A convention constituted by the people of Tennessee, and representing the 
great mass of the legitimate body politic of what should be a free and equal 
State of the Federal Union, directed your memorialists to make report to 
this assemblage of freemen of the oppressions, usurpations, and misrule to 
which this State has been subjected by the minions and agents of the party 
now in possession of the government of the United States. 

The tyrauuy, of which we on behalf of a great body of American citizens 
complain, is not the evil supremacy of a mere domestic faction maintaining 
itself against odds by its own vigor, talent, and courage. On the contraiy, 
if unsupported by the now misdirected powers of the Federal Union, the 
ruling oligarchs of our uufortunate commonwealth would not long abide 
the indignation of an outraged people. It is only because they represent and 
are executing the policy of the men now wielding the vast weight of Federal 
authority, who prostitute the resources of a great nation to uphold and pro- 
tect these petty oppressors of a noble State, that we appeal through you to 



90 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

the people of States yet free to aid us in the redress of wrongs which are 
intolerable to American freemen, and the longer continuance of which threat- 
ens either renewed convulsions or the entire subversion of liberty throughout 
the Republic. 

It is historically true that the present State organism of Teunessee was 
created in violation of all American precedent. It was not a government es- 
tablished by a majority of the citizens or of the inhabitants. It rests on a vote 
of twenty-two thousand, out of a voting population of one hundred and sixty 
thousand. 

It is likewise true that the Confederate soldier an$his sympathizer, on the 
surrender of the armies of the South, recognized the State Government as an 
exigency of civil war, and were entirely willing to waive its illegality, be- 
lieving that it would conform in its legislation to the spirit and meaning of 
the terms of surrender tendered by the United States, and that its adminis- 
tration would be relieved in the midst of peace of whatever harshness the 
military necessities, out of which it sprung, may have in the first instance 
required. It was expected that, instead of being confined to the interests of 
the few that inaugurated its existence, it would be generously and wisely 
expanded so as to embrace the whole people. Intending to accept in good 
faith the result of the war. as restoring the old boundaries of the UNION, 
and re-establishing the authority of the Federal Government over the seced- 
ing States, as also the abolition of slavery, our people did not apprehend 
that a State Government, the foundling of a military camp, would annul the 
settlement of the questions at is>ne in the civil war made by the armies in 
the field. Nor was it anticipated that harder terms would be exacted of the 
defeated belligerent when unarmed, than had been demanded of him by his 
brave adversary in the field, when with arms in his hands despair might have 
renewed his enterprise, and the hoiTors of a dishonorable submission, more 
terrible than those of hopeless war, might have recreated his wasted resour- 
ces. The parole of the Confederate, as understood among all honorable be- 
ligerents, guaranteed to him on the part of the supporters of the Union his 
pre-existing rights, civil and political, as a citizen, on the condition of obedi- 
ence to laws, State and Federal. To place the Southern citizen on a lower 
plane of civil and political liberty than that whereon the northern freeman 
stood, was a precedent so repugnant to the spirit and letter of all American 
Constitutions, and so fraught with danger to the Republic, that it wasuot be- 
lieved there could emerge from the turbulence of the times a faction so ma- 
lignant or insane as to propose, much less execute, so monstrous a project. 
Thus conceiving the situation, the people yielded a cheerful obedience to 
the State Government inaugurated during the war, confidently calculating that 
its administration and conduct would be such as would shortly legitimate it 
in their respect and affections. 

These just expectations of the people have not been realized. It soon be- 
came apparent that the faction accidentally in power did not intend to lecog- 
nize the submission of the people to the arms of the Union, unless for the 
future they would mortgage to them their opinions and votes. It was not 
sufficient that they had in good faith resumed their allegiance to Federal au- 
thority, so long as they reserved to themselves the right to think and vote as 
American freemen. To exclude them from all participation in the affairs of 
government, and reduce them substantially to a condition of alienage, while 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 91 

exacting of them all the duties, and imposing on them all the burdens of 
citizenship, was deemed the only expedient by which the men then in office 
could prolong their power. 

The amended Constitution proclaimed by the military governor of the 
State, — Andrew Johnson, — and accepted by those then having Tennessee in 
custody under Federal military occupation, granted power to the General 
Assembly to determine the qualifications of voters and the limitation of the 
elective franchise. It was in the exercise of this power under a constitution 
confessedly the work of not even one-third of the people, that a system o£ 
oppression was consummated, which has converted a once free and sovereign 
State of this Union into an odious despotism. The General Assembly first 
constituted after the proclamation of the amended constitution, when but a 
few of the citizens could vote, enacted three successive franchise laws, eaeli 
surpassing the former in harshness and injustice. The result of the legisla- 
tion on this matter has been the disfranchisement of more than two-thirds of the 
whites, and the surrender of the ballot to the negro. It would be impossible, 
within the appropriate compass of this memorial, to present in detail the 
enormities of these franchise acts. We can only briefly advert to them. 

These were passed from time to time as the necessities of the authorities 
required a restricted suffrage to maintain them in office. The only excep- 
tions to the rigor of these laws were those who had, or were supposed to 
have, assimilated with them in political sentiment. Thus political opinion 
was made the condition on which American Citizens should enjoy that fran- 
chise, by which alone their liberties can be pi-eserved, — access to the ballot- 
box. The principle worked out to its full extent enables a temporary 
majority to render its rule perpetual, or force the people ultimately to relieve 
themselves by revolutionary violence. The majority of to-day have only to 
find their present supremacy threatened by a change of opinion in the masses 
hostile to their policy and power, really converting them into a minority, to 
justify the line of action pursued in Tennessee. Then the work of excision 
from the polls may commence, narrowing in still decreasing circles the voting 
population, by depriving of the ballot such members of the hostile voters, as 
to leave under the control and for the support of the party in power a major- 
ity of the voters, but really an insignificant minority of the people. Then 
is established an oligarchy, the deadliest foe of popular liberty. 

A still more repulsive and tyrannical feature of these disfranchising aets 
is found in those provisions, which propound to the citizen, in order to exer- 
cise the right of suffrage, harsh and inquisitorial oaths, reaching not only his 
conduct, but his opinions in the past, aud putting upon him the alternative of 
committing perjury or of becoming his own accuser for the disabling acts* 
and sympathies, which, by the terms of the law, exclude him from the ballot. 
Thus has been inaugurated, amid the civilization of the nineteenth century, 
and in a Republic, that odious inquisition into the secret thoughts and private 
opinions of men, which has been justly deemed the peculiar disgrace of even 
a remote aud barbarous period, of even the most ignorant and cruel des- 
potism. t 

That provision of the Federal constitution which forbids a State to pass a 
bill of attainder or ex post facto law, has been either audaciously violated, or 
it is so easy of evasion as to be utterly worthless for the protection of Amer- 
ican citizens against the madness of faction or the licentiousness of power; 



92 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

and the intentions of the fraraers of that instrument have been utterly frus- 
trated by the ingenious devices of revenge and hatred. For it cannot be 
denied that, under the pretence of fixing the qualifications of voters, two- 
thirds of the white meii of this State have been divested of the elective fran- 
chise by legislative enactment, as a punishment for assumed offences for 
which they have never even been challenged by any process of law. 

By virtue of the disfranchisement of the great mass of the white people, 
Tennessee is now practically under the dominion of the negro. 

It was not, however, until it became apparent that no franchise law, how- 
ever restrictive or harsh as to the white population, would retain power in 
the hands of our domestic faction, that the negro was endowed with the 
ballot. To serve alone their selfish interest, all the great body of the white 
people of the State, citizens of the republic, long accustomed, under 
ancient usage and the laws of the State, to exercise the right of suffrage, were 
disfranchised, and the lately emancipated African slave, unfitted, according 
to the universal experience of mankind, for self-government, entrusted with 
the gravest duties ever devolved on freemen. If this legislation resulted 
from any conviction, that universal suffrage, regardless of race as a princi- 
ple, should be introduced into the American system, however foolish and 
dangerous we might esteem the measure, its projectors would, at least, be 
entitled to that respect which ever attaches to sincerity. But we are not 
permitted by the facts to accord to them this consideration. If it was on 
principle, and from an honest conviction of duty, that the ballot was granted 
the rude, illiterate, and still semi-barbarous negro, it would have been done 
at once, and not postponed until every expedient had been tried by the 
present official incumbents to get along without his vote. Nor would an 
honest advocate of negro suffrage deem it consistent with his theory to ex- 
clude the great body of white people from the elective franchise, while be- 
stowing it on the African race. We are therefore compelled, in justice to 
the truth of history, to represent all these outrages on the ancient rights, 
liberties, and privileges of American citizens as perpetrated solely in the 
interest of a party, and to maintain in official position a particular class. 
Because the whites would not sustain this class and their policies, they are 
stripped of their franchises of American freedom, and the African is arrayed 
against them, for the present dominating over them, — an elevation of an 
inferior race, however inconvenient and insulting for the present to the 
superior, to ultimately result, as all intelligent men must know, in the utmost 
future calamity to the negro. 

In the past career of the Republic, party antagonisms have been productive 
of many evils and great wrongs, — have often been marked by public inde- 
corum and individual depravity; but never before the present, and now 
passing period in our history has any political organization dared to trample 
on the substantial liberties of the American citizeu, or sought to wrest the 
elective franchise from those entitled to it by the ancient usage and laws of 
the Republic. No faction ever before proposed to secure its sucess by such 
a crime ! 

This offence is the more rank, because the act does not stop with striking 
down the liberties and franchises of the citizen, but heaps upon the victims 
of this lawlessness the ignominy of political subordination to an inferior 
race. Did the founders of the Republic ever intend that any part of the 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 93 

White should be subjected to the black race? It concerns the people of the 
Northern Slates, who, thank God! are yet free, scarcely less than those repre- 
sented by your memorialists, to overthrow the infamous policies of which we 
complain. If our people within the several Southern States are to be taxed, 
and our domestic policy shaped, by the lately emancipated slave and the 
irresponsible adventurer, who uses him as an unreasoning instrument of his 
purpose, so will the Northern citizen be taxed in the National Assessment by 
the same constituency, and through the national legislature his political and 
material interests will be affected by the same unintelligent and irresponsible 
vote. To substitute for the intelligent white voter of the South, the negro 
elector is to expose the interests of the North to almost the same hazard 
that threatens those of the South. In this matter, the welfare of the white man 
in the South cannot be separated from that of the white man in the North. 

Odious and oppressive as are the franchise laws of Tennessee, thc3 r have 
been greatly aggravated in all their evils by the registration acts and their 
administration. The first statute committed the work of registration to the 
Clerks of the County Courts, who are officers elected by the people, and 
therefore so situated as to understand that it was not prudent for them to 
play the role of petty tyrants, or trifle with the rights and liberties of the 
citizen. But, by a subsequent act, these delicate and responsible duties have 
been assigned to Commissioners appointed by the Governor, to whom alone 
they are substantially responsible for their conduct. It is true that there is 
a provision subjecting these Commissioners to punishment, as for a misde- 
meanor for wilful and intentional violation of the law. But when it is con- 
sidered that, by the terms of the law, the burden of proof as to wilfulness and 
intention of the corrupt register is thrown on the accusing party, and that it 
is so easy for the offending officer to have his dereliction construed into a 
mere mistake, it will be seen that the people are without protection, in this 
regard, against the corrupt practices or arbitrary action of the registers. 
To render this very slight and evasive restraint on the conduct of this official 
utterly insufficient for the security of the people, the legislature has ordered 
that the counsel fees and costs of suit incurred by him in defending auy pros- 
ecution, penal orcivil, instituted against him for a violation of the rights of 
the citizen in the performance of his official duty, be paid out of the public 
treasury, — thus taxing the people to pay the expenses of their oppressors in- 
curred in the perpetration of the wrong. When it is remembered that the 
tax-payers of the State are those opposed to the faction in power, and conse- 
quently those against whom these Commissioners of Registration would be 
most likely to perpetrate, and do, in fact, work injustice, the vice and tyranny 
of this legislation must at once become apparent. In effect, it compels free- 
men to pay for the chains with which they are to be bound. 

Additional impunity is secured to these servants of the executive by a stat- 
ute, which enables them to' exclude from the jury-box, by challenge for cause, 
any one who is not a voter. Thus is rendered certain in every trial an availa- 
ble partisan influence on the panel, in behalf of the transgressing register. 

On the other hand, the authorities controlling the State have not left their 
interests to the hazard of even the accidental or occasional honesty of these 
officers. The power has been reserved to the executive to declare, by sim- 
ple proclamation, the registration of any county void, and to remove, at his 
sovereign will, any register that may excite his suspicion or incur his dis- 



94 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

pleasure. Thus has been reposed in the executive department of the gov- 
ernment the entire control of the ballot-box, and to that end he exercises 
judicial and executive functions, — judicial, to divest, and that, too, without 
trial, freemen of privileges duly acquired, — executive, to inflict his own sen- 
tence of divestiture, in violation of all principles of free government, against 
all precedents known to American law, and in utter disregard of the provis- 
ions of the constitution. This arbitrary power has been often exercised by 
the present executive, and always redounding to the advantage of the faction 
supporting him and his policy. In this state of the case where is there a foot- 
hold for those who would lift from earth the prostrate form of Liberty, and 
reanimate her fainting spirit? Personal ambition and desire for official pre- 
ferment are by every selfish consideration enlisted on the side of absolutism, 
because all expectants of place must bow to him who can work through the 
registers any elective result desired. It is vain to expect in any canvass, 
through a fair and orderly polling, a successful issue for him who opposes 
in opinion "the powers that be." With the entire control of the ballot-box 
thus secured in the hands of one man, the exercise of the elective franchise 
is but a delusive and idle ceremony. Though the result purports to be ac- 
complished through Democratic forms, it is none the less the mere expression 
of autocratic will. The candid rescript of the emperor would be better, be- 
cause none could be deceived as to what was the fact in the present, nor de- 
luded by vain hopes as to the future. 

In addition to all this, the conviction is general, among the citizens of the 
State, that while the act of legislation is made easy and rapid for such whites 
as are known to affiliate with the authorities of the State, and for negroes 
who are manipulated in the same interest by secret political societies, and 
army officers in the Freedman's Bureau, the same process is rendered difficult 
and slow for the whites, who are known to be opposed in sentiment to the 
now prevailing policies of the State and of Congress. Thus, in many instan- 
ces, by these indirect methods, the party in place is relieved against a hostile 
suffrage, from which even their rigorous franchise laws would not protect 
them. 

We are therefore compelled to announce to this Convention that Republi- 
can government, as understood by Americans, no longer exists in the State 
of Tennessee; that freedom of elections, the chief muniment of English and 
American liberty has perished; that freemen may there be disseized of price- 
less privileges without the judgment of their peers even, and otherwise than 
by the laws of the land; and that the order of Warsaw reigns throughout her 
borders. 

The evil effects of this oppressive policy are already plainly manifest in 
the material condition of the State, and palpably visible on the surface of 
society. We will briefly advert to them. 

The great body of the whites, feeling that they are victims of oppression ; 
that they are unjustly deprived of any share in the government; that they 
are in all respects fitted by intelligence to participate in affairs of State ; 
and remembering that the political privileges of which they have been de- 
prived constituted a part of their birthright, — are discontented, and appre- 
hend still greater calamities and outrages. They recognize that at present they 
are neither secure in their property or liberties. Stripped of suffrage, they 
cannot defend them at the ballot-box. Their foes among the whites, and the • 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 95 

negroes granted by the statute the privilege of being armed, while the same 
is denied to them, deprives them of that sense of security which ever resides 
with physical power, and places them under a constant menace from the 
vicious and depraved elements of society. Hence the division between the 
people and their rulers is something more than the mere array of conflicting 
opinions, which, with free suffrage, and free speech, seldom breeds civil com- 
motion, or injuriously affects the State. It is in this instance the threaten- 
ing antagonism between the oppressor on the one hand, and the oppressed on 
the other. The apprehension and natural resentment of the latter, and the 
official insolence and hate of the former, retorting the detestation of which he 
is conscious, are constantly recurring provocations to physical violence. 
Experience and history prove that there can be neither happiness nor pros- 
perity for a State thus circumstauced. So long as republican forms are pre- 
ferred on this continent, no American State can have any assurance of peace 
and prosperity unless the ballot is free to the white American citizen. The 
inherent vigor and imperial qualities of the white race will be content with 
nothing less until they shall agree to accept other political institutions. 

It is of the utmost importance to every free State, that those who are the 
most intelligent, have the largest stake in social order, and possess property, 
or are interested in property by the hope of accumulation through steady 
industry, should participate in the government. But, in our unfortunate 
Commonwealth, this is the very class which are excluded from the manage- 
ment of its affairs. The people are thus deprived in public business of the 
efficient capacity of their best citizens. Their affairs are consequently in the 
hands of incapable men, — too often entirely controlled by those who are 
mere adventurers camped in their midst, like vagrant Huns for the purposes 
of present plunder, in whose fidelity to their interests and integrity they have 
not the slighest confidence, and to whom the language of Col. Barre used 
in the British Parliament to describe a similar class that infested the Ameri- 
can colonies, may not inappropriately be applied, when he spoke of the 
colonial officers as "men sent to spy out their liberties, to misrepresent their 
actions, and to prey upon them, — men whose behavior on many occasions 
has caused the blood of those sons of liberty to recoil within them ! " Yet 
it would not be strict justice not to admit some honorable exceptions to this 
rule. But these exceptions serve to modify only to a very limited extent the 
vices and disorders naturally inherent in such depraved and tyrannical poli- 
cies. For instance, though we have on the bench some honest judges of re- 
spectable ability, it is manifest that the Courts of the State lose their self- 
possession and quail when confronted by the political ferocity of the hour. 
Hard is the lot of that people when law shrinks from the defence of her own 
altars from profanation, and plays the coward within "the holy of holie:-." 
England has always accounted it an excess of misfortune whenever her 
judiciary for a moment lost its fearless independence. Shall American re- 
publicans manifest in this matter less sensibility than British subjects? Will 
they not demand that courts and judges shall stand uumoved amid the tem- 
pest of civil strife to defend the right even against their own mad passions? 

Those laboring under disabilities as to suffrage and office embrace the 
highest intellects of the State. Among the disfranchised will be found the 
aged pioneer, who, with axe and rifle, redeemed from the rude wilderness, 
and the still ruder savage, our fruitful soil; secured to civilization and culture 



96 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

her lovely valleys and plains, and maintained with Jackson on the ramparts 

of New Orleans the flag of the Republic. On the same role of alienizcd 
citizens will be found the great mass of the descendants of the founders of 
the Commonwealth, who, representing in their characters, as well as 
lineage, the virtues and heroism of a worthy ancestory, have themselves, ac- 
cording to their varied abilities, served the country in war or in peace. There 
must still be added to this aggregate of attainted merit her adopted sons, 
attracted from every State of the Union, as well as from foreign lands, to her 
generous hearthstone. We ask if it is no grievance, no wrong, to Tennessee, 
that, in the administration of her affairs, she should be deprived of the in- 
telligence and virtue, both at the ballot-box, and in office, of her noblest 
people? Is there no wrong in thus deposing from their chartered rights this 
great and worthy body of American citizenship? 

The property and accumulating industry of the State being excluded 
from all available influence in the construction of the legislature is, in fact, 
taxed without representation. The property of the State is without repre- 
sentation, because the great mass of those who hold it are disfranchised, and 
the few property holders who have been so fortunate as to secure legislation 
cast fruitless votes against the vagabondage that now controls at the hust- 
ings the destinies of the Commonwealth. It is the same case with the large 
proportion of the laboring white men. The negroes whose votes create the 
taxing body, have, with scarcely a single exception, no property to be taxed. 
They do not even pay a poll assessment, and are either in fact, or permitted 
by the county authorities for political advautage, to be paupers to an ex- 
cessive extent, and a charge on the taxes wrung from the disfranchised 
whites. Put in place by such a constituency, and most generally himself un- 
affected by any tax which he may create, it is not to be expected that the 
legislator would be at all economical in dealing with the financial affairs of 
the State, or that he would particularly care if taxation should become so 
excessive as to amount to practical confiscation. 

The result is just what might be expected. The debt of the State is con- 
tinually increased, her resources diminished, and her taxation fearfully 
enhanced. By unusual and enormous levies on her merchants, trade is driven 
from our cities and State to other cities and States. The returns of me- 
chanical industry are consumed in obtaining a meagre support and paying 
taxes, leaving no accumulations behind. The farmer, who should be inde- 
pendent, can scarcely, with the most favorable seasons, balance his books. 
Our courts in many parts of the State are besieged by clamorous tax-payers 
seeking by litigation either to be relieved of unconstitutional assessments, or 
to delay their collection. In fine, property impoverishes. Thrift but ac- 
cumulates for the tax-gatherer laws, while the foreigner and citizen of other 
States are repelled from our borders by the same misrule. Thus our miserable 
State, with the finest climate that ever blest the most fruitful and varied soil, 
is wasted in every fibre and muscle. 

We have, in the presentation of the political condition of Tennessee, 
abstained from impeaching individual corruption and private dereliction. We 
designed to arraign a hideous system of oppression, fix attention on the 
great principles of constitutional liberty violated, and expose hateful, and, 
therefore, unwise policies. The best ministers of tyrannical laws will become 
depraved, and vicious administrations will necessarily breed bad men. Nor 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 97 

has our State, in this regard, enjoyed immunity, but, on the contrary, has 
been duly afflicted by these additional aggravations of her situation. To de- 
pict these, however, might plausibly subject us to the imputation of partisan 
heat. It is the system at which we strike. Destroy that, and the offenders 
disappear with their offences, soon to be forgotten, like other calamities 
of life, in restored happiness and a resumed prosperity. The business of 
our paper is not to accuse this or that man, this or that official, but to pre- 
sent to the members of this Convention, and through them to the people of 
the North, the grave and solemn question, — whether a sovereign State of 
the Federal Union shall be l'etained in bondage, and thousands of her 
people made miserable ; to remind the Northern States that once consenting 
to the enslavement of any one of the Federal circle, they but prepare for the 
divestiture at some future day of their own sovereign rights; to remind 
the people that for them to instigate, or even permit, the degradation and 
vassalage of an American citizen is to forge their own manacles for future 
imposition, and to adjust their own limbs for the gyves of the oppressor. 

T. W. Brown, 

J. E. Burley, 

Wm. A. Qtjarles, y Committee. 

J. H. Callexder, 

Wm. Clare, 

After the reading of the memorial, a delegate from Indiana stated 
that his delegation were still in consultation, and not ready to return 
to the hall ; but that, in the mean time, he was authorized, on behalf 
of the delegation, to cast the vote of that State as heretofore, — thir- 
teen for Mr. Pendleton. 
7 



98 



OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 



The Secretary announced the vote on the fifth ballot, as follows,- 

The whole number of votes cast 317 

James E. English 7 

W. S. Hancock , 46 

George H. Pendleton 122 

Joel Parker 13 

Sanford E. Church , 33 

Asa Packer 27 

Andrew Johnson 2-t 

James R. Doolittle 15 

Thomas A. Hendricks 194 

Frank P. Blair 94 

Reverdy Johnson • — 

Thomas Ewiug, Jr — 

J. Q. Adams 1 

FIFTH BALLOT — RECAPITULATION. 



STATES. 


d 
a 

Q 


to 


>< 
O 

o 

3 


O 

Si 

q 

>, 


ft? 
ft, 


3 

to 


ftj 

ft. 


© 

N 
o 


g 

© 
o 



to 
O 

ftj 

R 
>^ 
&a 

hi 
i 

2 

1 
1 

8 

3 5 
i 

2 

5 

191 


"X) 

9 

2 
92 


O 

'<. 

hi 
o 


© 
,6h 


i 

*i 




8 
5 
5 
6 
3 
3 

e 

16 
13 
8 
3 
11 
7 
7 

12 
8 
4 
7 

11 
3 
3 
5 
7 

33 
9 

21 
3 

26 
4 
6 

10 
6 
5 

10 
5 
8 

317 


1 
*6 

7 


4* 

ii 

7 

3 

oi 

6 

46 


3 
1 

3 

10 
13 

8 

11 

H 

5 

1 

4 

5i 

ii 

~h 

21 

3 

2 

10 
5 

122 


3 

7 
13 


33 


1 

26 

27 


8 
1 
1 

1 

10 
24 


3 

4 

8 
15 
















Delaware 

Florida 








Indiana 
































Missouri 

Nebraska 








New .1 ersey 




North Carolina 














i 


Tennessee 




Total 


i 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 99 

Mr. Tildex, of New York. —The New York delegation ask leave to retire 
for the purpose of designating their member for the National Executive 
Committee. • 

Cries of " No ! no ! no ! " 

The question was put upon granting the request of the New York 
delegation, and it was decided lost. 

The Secretary then proceeded with the call of the roll, and called 
again the State of 

Alabama. — Eight votes for Andrew Johnson. 

Arkansas. — Four for Blair, one for Johnson. 

California. — Three for Parker, one for Pendleton, one for Packer. 

Connecticut. — Six for English. 

Delaware. — Three for Pendleton. 

Florida. — Three for Hendricks. 

Georgia. — Eight and a half for Pendleton, one-half for Blair. 

Illinois. — Sixteen for Pendleton. 

Indiana. — No response was made, the delegation being out. 

Iowa. — Eight for Pendleton. 

Kansas. — Two and a half for Hendricks, one and a half for Blair. 

Kentucky. — Eleven for Pendleton. 

Louisiana. — Four and a half for Hancock, one and a half for Pendleton, 
one for Hendricks. 

Maryland. — Five and a half for Pendleton, one for Andrew Johnson, a 
half for Hendricks. 

Massachusetts. — Eleven for Hancock, one for Pendleton. 

Michigan. — Eight for Hendricks. 

Minnesota. — Four for Pendleton. 

Mississippi. — Seven for Hancock. 

Missouri. — Four for Pendleton, two and a half for Hancock, three for 
Hendricks ; one for Andrew Johnson. 

Nebraska. — Three for Pendleton. 

Nevada. — Three for Joel Parker. 

New Hampshire.-— One-halt for Hendricks, one and a half for Pendleton, 
three for Gen. Hancock. 

New Jersey. — Seven for Parker. 

New York. — Thirty-three for Sanford E. Church, of New York. 

North Carolina. —Eight and a half for Hendricks, two and a half for Pen- 
dleton. 

Ohio. — Twenty-one for Pendleton. 

Oregon. — Three for Pendleton. 

Pennsylvania. — Mr. Clymer : The Chairman of the Pennsylvania Delegation 
being temporarily absent, has asked me to perform the duty for him, to an- 
nounce that Pennsylvania casts twenty-six votes for Packer. 

Bhode Island. — Rhode Island gives- four votes for James R. Doolittle. 

South Carolina. — Six for Gen. Hancock. 

Tennessee. — Ten for Andrew Johnson. 

Texas. — Six for Hancock. 

Vermont. — Five for Hendricks. 



100 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

Virginia. — Ten for George H. Pendleton. (Applause.) 

West Virginia. — Five for Pendleton. 

Wisconsin. — Eight for Doolittle. 

Indiana. — The Chairman of the Delegation: The Indiana Delegation are 
still in consultation. In the mean time, I shall venture to cast the vote as 
before, — thirteen for Pendleton. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 



101 



The Secretary announced the result, as follows, — 

Total number of votes cast 316£ 

James E. English 6 

W. S. Hancock 47 

George H. Pendleton 1224 

Joel Parker 13 

Sanford E. Church 33 

Asa Packer 27 

Andrew Johnson 21 

James R. Doolittle 12 

Thomas A. Hendricks 30 

Frank P. Blair 5 



SIXTH BALLOT — RECAPITULATION. 



STATES. 



Alabama 

Arkansas 

California 

Connecticut .... 

Delaware 

Florida 

Georgia 

Illinois , 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas , 

Kentucky 

Louisiana , 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts... 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire. 

New Jersey 

New York 

North Carolina . . 

Ohio 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania. . . . 
Rhode Island — 
South Carolina . . 
Tennessee 

Texas 

Vermont 

Virginia 

West Virginia. .. 
Wisconsin 

Total 



317 



47 122J 



33 



13 33 



27 21 



30 



102 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

Mr. Carter, of North Carolina. — It is quite obvious, sir, that we are ac- 
complishing nothing. I therefore move that we adjourn until to-morrow 
morning at ten o'clock. 

Many Delegates. — " No, no." 

Mr. Clymer. — I move to amend by saying that we take a recess until 
seven o'clock this evening. 

The Chairman. — The question must first be put on the motion to adjourn. 

The motion was rejected. 

Mr. Clymer. — I move to take a recess until seven o'clock this evening. 

The motion was rejected. 

Mr. Campbell, of Pennsylvania. — The Pennsylvania Delegation ask leave 
to retire for consultation. 

The question was put, and leave was refused. 

Mr. Stevens, of New Jersey. — I move that we take a recess until six 
o'clock. 

The question was put, and the result was doubtful. 

The President. — The list of States will be called, for it is impossible for 
the Chair to decide the question. 

A Delegate. — I move to adjourn. 

The Cuau?man. — The motion is not now in order, as the Chair is not now 
certain what the result of the last vote was. The Clerk will read a communi- 
cation. 

Endorsement of the Platform bjf the Soldiers and Sailors 1 

Convention. 

The Secretary read the following communication to the Conven- 
tion. 

Resolved, That the declaration of principles adopted by the Democratic 
National Convention be, and the same are hereby approved. 

Ordered, That the Secretary communicate to the Democratic Convention 
a copy of the above resolution forwith. 

James O'Bierne, 
Secretary Soldiers and Sailors' Convention. 

To the Democratic Convention. 

Mr. Richardson, of Illinois. — I move that the document just received 
from the Soldiers' and Sailors' Convention be put upon the record of the 
Convention and made part of the proceedings. 

The motion prevailed. 

Mr. D. M. Carter, of North Carolina. — I move we take a recess until six 
o'clock this evening. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 



103 



The vote was taken on the motion, by States, as follows : affirm- 
ative, 99 ; negative, 218. 



Yeas.- 



5 
6 
2 
3 

16 
13 

3 
11 

7 

7 

-7 

12 



7 — 



Teas. 



Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire . . . 

New Jersey • 

New York 

North Carolina .... 

Ohio 

Oregon — 

Pennsylvania 26 



Navs. 
3 



3 — 

5 — 

7 — 

-- 33 

9 — 

— 21 

— 3 



Nays. 

Alabama — 8 

Arkansas — 5 

California. . .. 
Connecticut. . 

Delaware 

Florida 

Georgia 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky .... 

Louisiana. 

Maine 

Maryland . . . 
Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota .... 
Mississippi . . . 
Missouri 

Mr. White, of Maryland. — I move we now adjourn. 

The Chairman. — The motion now is that the Convention do adjourn, 
carries us over until the regular meeting to-morrow, at ten o'clock. 

The Secrktakt. — I am requested by the National Committee to say that 
the chairmen of the respective delegations will call at the National Commit- 
tee rooms, in this building, this evening, at eight o'clock, and receive their 
tickets of admission. Tickets may be obtained on an order sent by any chair- 
man of a delegation. I have also to announce that the delegation of Pennsyl- 
vania are requested to meet this evening at Irving Hall, at eight o'clock. 

The Secretary announced that the vote on the motion to adjourn 
stood 218 for the motion, to 99 against, as follows, — 



Rhode Island. 
South Carolina 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Vermont 

Virginia 

West Virginia. 
Wisconsin 

Total 



4 — 

— 6 

— 10 

— 6 

5 — 
10 — 

5 — 



99 218 



It 



Yeas. Nays 

Alabama 8 — 

Arkansas 5 — 

California 5 — 

Connecticut 6 — 

Delaware 2 1 

Florida 3 — 

Georgia — 9 

Illinois 16 — 

Indiana 13 — 

Iowa — 8 

Kansas 3 — 

Kentucky 11 — 

Louisiana 7 — 

Maine 7 — 

Maryland 7 — 

Massachusetts 12 — 

Michigan 8 — 

Minnesota 4 — 

Mississippi : — 7 



Yeas. Nays. 

Nebraska 2 

Nevada — 3 

New Hampshire — 5 

Ne w Jersey — 7 

New York 33 — 

North Carolina — 9 

Ohio 21 -- 

Oregon 3 — 

Pennsylvania — 26 

Rhode Island — 4 

South Carolina 6 — 

Tennessee 10 — 

Texas 6 — 

Vermont — 5 

Virginia — 10 

West Virginia — 5 

Wisconsin 8 — 

Total 218 99 



Missouri 11 — 

The Convention, at three and a half o'clock, was declared ad- 
journed until Wednesday morning, at ten o'clock. 



104 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

FOURTH DAY. 

July 8, 1868. 

The Convention was called to order by the President, Hon. Hora- 
tio Seymour. 

On motion of General McCook, the reading of the minutes of 
yesterday's proceedings was dispensed with. 

Mr. Wells, of Missouri, asked that the names of the Executive 
Committee be read. 

The Secretary read the names as follows, — 

The National Executive Committee, 

Alabama. —John Forsyth, Mobile. 

Arkansas. —John M. Harrell, Little Rock. 

California. — John Bigler, Sacramento City. 

Connecticut. — Wm. M. Couverse, Franklin. 

Delaware. — Samuel Towuseud, Newcastle. 

Florida. — Charles E. Dyke, Tallahassee. 

Georgia.— A. II. Colquit, Albany. 

Illinois. — Wilbur F. Storey, Chicago. 

Indiana. — William E. Niblack, Viucennes. 

Iowa. — Daniel O. Finch, Des Moines. 

Kansas. — Isaac E. Eaton, Leavenworth City. 

Kentucky. — Thomas C. McCreery, Owensboro. 

Louisiana. — James McCloskey, New Orleans. 

Maine. — Sylvauus R. Lyman Portland. 

Maryland. — Odin Bowie, Prince George. 

Massachusetts. — Frederick O. Prince, Boston. 

Michigan. — William A. Moore, Detroit. 

Minnesota. — Charles W. Nash, St. Paul. 

Mississippi. — Charles E. Hooker, Jackson. 

Missouri. — Charles A. Mauts, St. Louis. 

Nebraska. — G. L. Miller, Omaha. 

Nevada. — J. W. McCorkle, Virginia City. 

New Hampshire. — Harry Bingham, Littleton. 

New Jersey. — John McGregor, Newark. 

New York. — August Belmont, New York City. 

North Carolina. — Thomas Bragg, Raleigh. 

Ohio. — John G. Thompson, Columbus. 

Oregon. — J. C. Hawthorn, Portland. 

Pennsylvania. — Isaac Eskister, Lancaster. 

Iihode Island. — Gideon Bradford, Providence. 

South Carolina. — Charles H. Simonton, Charleston. 

Tennessee. — John W. Leftwich, Memphis. 

Texas. — John Hancock, Austin. 

Vermont. — H. B. Smith, Milton. 

Virginia. — John Goode, Norfolk. 

West Virginia. —John Hall, Point Pleasant. 

Wisconsin . — Frederick W. Horn, Cedarburg. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 105 

Mr. Tarbei.l, of Ohio. — I move that without further delay we proceed to 
the calling of the States. 

Mr. Graham V. Fitcii, of Indiana. — Before proceeding with the.callof the 
States, Indiana claims the right heretofore conceded to other States, to pre- 
sent the name of one of her most talented citizens as a candidate for nomina- 
tion by this Convention. The name is known to the Convention, for he has 
already received a respectable vote here. That vote, however, came from 
other than his own State, a tribute to the worth of one of the best and purest 
men in the nation. (Applause.) Circumstances which occurred before the 
connection of his name with the nomination rendered it, in the estimation of 
the delegation from his State, highly proper and right that they should give 
their vote a reasonable length of time for the distinguished candidate from 
Ohio. In the opinion of a majority of the delegation from Indiana that time 
has passed, and they are left to vote their own preference, and what they 
believe to be the preference of their people. From this opiuion a minority 
of the delegation dissent, and deem that their obligation to sustain Mr. Pen- 
dleton is not yet discharged. The majority have no desire to control, and 
make no attempt to control, even if there was the slightest probability of the 
attempt being successful, the action of that minority. We concede to them 
the best of motives, a desire merely to conscientiously discharge a delegated 
trust. The citizen, whose name we are about to present, is a man of unim- 
peached private character and unimpeached public record. He is a gentle- 
man, sir, in all the relations of life. He is not, he never was, an office-seeker 
himself, but whatever position has been bestowed upon him by the partiality 
of the citizens of his own State has been bestowed unsought and by acclama- 
tion. He is second to no man within our borders in ability, in devotion to 
the Union, in attachment to the principles of Democracy, in integrity of pur- 
pose, and in firmness in the discharge of duty. That citizen is Thomas A. 
Hendricks. (Loud applause.) 

A Delegate from Indiana. — On behalf of the minority of the delegation from 
the State of Indiana, I claim the privilege here to state in a few words the 
reasons that governed our action. A majority of the delegation following 
in the lead of the votes being cast for Mr. Hendricks, a gentleman who com- 
mands the highest respect and confidence in the State of Indiana in all the 
positions that he has held, and the one he now holds, have decided to cast 
their votes for him. Without impugning the honor of any man from the 
State of Indiana, I wish to give the reasonfc why I cannot go with them. 
On the 5th day of January last the Democracy of Indiana assembled at In- 
dianapolis in such array of numbers and talent as never before assembled in 
that State, and they adopted a resolution expressing a preference for George 
H. Pendleton (Cheers) over the most determined and persistent opposition. 
In respect to that resolution, at the first meeting of the delegation in this city 
(and no gentleman on the delegation will controvert it), it was agreed that 
the vote of Indiana should be cast for Mr. Pendleton so long as there was a rea- 
sonable hope of his nomination. (Cheers.) A majority of the delegation 
have rescinded that resolution, as I suppose they have a right to do. I 
merely claim that by the record, and by my conscientious conviction, my 
duty as a delegate of the State of Indiana is, so long as there is a reasonable 
hope of his nomination, to vote for George H. Pendleton, of Ohio. (Cheers.) 



106 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

The Secretary. — A majority of the delegation from Indiana have placed 
in nomination the name of Thomas A. Hendricks. (Cheers.) 

The Chairman. —If there is no other nomination, the Secretary will now 
proceed to call the roll of the States. 

The Seventh Ballot. 

The call of States was then made. 

The ballot then proceeded, as follows, — 

Alabama. — A unit for Pendleton. 

•Arkansas. — A unit for Hendricks. 

California. — Three votes for George H. Pendleton, one and a half for 
Hancock, and one-half for Hendricks. 

Connecticut. — (Passed for the present.) 

Delaware. — Three votes for George H. Pendleton. (Cheers.) 

Florida. — Three votes for Hendricks. 

Georgia. — Eight votes for George H. Pendleton, and one for Hendricks. 

Illinois. — Sixteen votes for Pendleton. 

Indiana. — (Passed for the present.) 

Iowa. — Eight votes for Pendleton. 

Kansas. — Two votes for Pendleton, half a vote for Hendricks, and half a 
vote for Prank P. Blair. 

Kentucky. — Eleven votes for Pendleton. 

Louisiana. — Seven votes for Hancock. 

Maine. — Hancock four and a half, Pendleton one and a half, and Hendricks 
one. 

Maryland. — Six and a half for Pendleton, and one and a half for Hendricks. 

Massachusetts. — Eleven votes for Hancock, and one for Pendleton. 

Michigan. — Eight for Hendricks. 

Minnesota. — Four for Pendleton. 

Mississippi. — Seven for Pendleton. 

Missouri. — Four for Pendleton, five for Hendricks, one for Andrew John- 
son, and one-half for Hancock. 

Nebraska. — Three for Pendleton. 

Nevada. — Three for Pendleton. 

New Hampshire. — Half for Hendricks, one and a half for Pendleton, and 
three for Hancock. 

New Jersey. — Seven for Joel Parker. 

New York. — Thirty-three for Sanford E. Church. 

North Carolina. — Nine for General Hancock. 

Ohio. — Twenty-one votes for George II. Pendleton. 

Oregon. — The Chairman of the Delegation, Mr. Bell. Mr. President, in 
casting the vote of my State this morning, it is with a feeling that the 
Democracy has recently achieved an overwhelming victory over the policy 
of the Chicago Convention. 
Cries of " Order, order." 

The President. — Is the gentleman going to announce a new candidate? 

Mr. Bell. — No, sir. 

The President. — Then you are not in order. 

Mr. Bell. — I desire simply to give the reason for our vote this morning. 
The President. — If you desire to make a new nominatiou, that is in 
order. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 107 

Mr. Bkll. — Well, sir, I will simply say that I wish to nominate George H. 
Fendletou. (Laughter and cheers.) 

Pennsylvania. — Twenty-sis votes for Packer. 

Rhode Island. — Four votes for Doolittle. 

South Carolina. — Six votes for Andrew Johnson. 

Tennessee. — Five and a half votes for Andrew Johnson, and four and a half 
for Pendleton. 

Texas. — Six votes for General Hancock. 

Vermont. — Five votes for Hendricks. 

Virginia. — Ten votes for Pendleton. 

Wist Virginia. — Five votes for Pendleton. 

Wisconsin. — Eight votes for Doolittle. 

Connecticut. — Six votes for English. 

Indiana. — Nine aDd a half for Hendricks, and three and a half for Pen- 
dleton. 



108 



OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 



The Secretary announced the result, as follows, — 

Total number of votes cast 3164 

James E. English 6 

W. S. Hancock 42£ 

George H. Pendleton 137£ 

Joel Parker 7 

Sanford E. Church 33 

Asa Packer 26 

Andrew Johnson 124 

James R. Doolittle 12 

Thomas A. Hendricks 39£ 

Frank P. Blair h 



SEVENTH BALLOT — RECAPITULATION. 



STATES. 



Alabama 

Arkansas 

California 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

Florida 

Georgia 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine. 

Maryland 

Massachusetts. . . 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire, 

New Jersey 

New York 

North Carolina . , 

Ohio 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania. . . 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina . , 

Tennessee 

Texas , 

Vermont 

Virginia 

West Virginia.. 
Wisconsin 

Total 



:"(HV 



H 



137J 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 109 

Mr. Tilden, of New York. — Mr. President, by the rule adopted by the 
New York delegation, the chairman is instructed to convene a meeting upon 
the requisition of any five members. I have received such a requisition, 
and I respectfully ask of the Convention leave to retire for the purpose of 
consultation. 

The Pkesident pro tern, Gen. Thomas L. Price. — If there be no objec- 
tion, the delegation from New York will have leave to retire. * 

Mr. Finch. —I object. 

The question was put upon allowing the New York delegation to 
retire for consultation, and it was agreed to. 

The President pro tern, put the question upon proceeding immedi- 
ately to another ballot, and it was agreed to. 

Mr. Clymer moved that the Convention take a recess of fifteen 
minutes, which was agreed to. 

The Convention accordingly took a recess of fifteen minutes. 

Eighth Ballot. 

The Convention proceeded to the eighth ballot for a candidate for 
President, and the Secretary called the roll of States, as follows, — 

Alabama. — Seven for Pendleton. 

Arkansas. — Five for Hendricks. 

California. — Three and a half for Pendleton and one and a half for Hancock. 

Connecticut. — Six for English. 

Delaware. — Three for Pendleton. 

Florida. — Three for Hendricks. 

Georgia. — Nine for Pendleton. 

Illinois. — Sixteen for Pendleton. 

Indiana. — Nine and a half for Hendricks, and three and a half for Pen- 
dleton. 

Mr. Reeves. — Mr. Chairman, as one of the delegation from Indiana, I have 
twice announced that I will withhold my vote ; but it has been announced 
both times. It should be nine votes for Hendricks and two and a half for 
Pendleton. 

Mr. Pitch, Chairman of the Delegation. — My friend is mistaken. I 
announced his vote for George H. Pendleton. 

Mr. Reeves. — It must not be counted for anybody. 

Mr. Pitch. — Leave the record as it is. 

Mr. Reeves. — Does the chairman of the delegation insist upon my casting 
my vote against my will. 

The President pro tern. — By the order of the Convention, each chairman 
is allowed to cast the vote of the delegation. 

Mr. Reeves. — Well, sir, Mr. Pitch, nor no other man, can cast my vote. 

Iowa. — Eight for Pendleton. 

Kansas. — Two for Pendleton, one-half for Hendricks, and one-half for 
Frank P. Blair. 

Kentucky. — Eleven for Pendleton. 

Louisiana. — Seven for Pendleton. 



110 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF TIIE 

Maine. — Four and a half for Hancock, one and a half for Pendleton, and 
one for Hendricks. 

Maryland. — Six for Pendleton, and one for Hendricks. 

Massachusetts. — Eleven for Hancock, and one for Pendleton. 

Michigan. — Eight for Hendricks. 

Minnesota. — Four for Pendleton. 

Mississippi. — Seven for Pendleton. 

Missouri. — Five for Pendleton, Ave for Hendricks, one-half for Hancock, 
and one-half for Andrew Johnson. 

Nebraska.— Three for Pendleton. 

Nevada. — Three for Pendleton. (Cheers.) 

New Hampshire. — One-half vote for Hendricks, one and a half for Pendle- 
ton, three for Hancock. (Applause.) 

New Jersey. — Seven for Parker. 

New York — had not returned when her name was reached, and was passed 
temporarily. 

North Carolina. — Four and a half for Pendleton, three and a half for Hen- 
dricks, and one for Hancock. 

Ohio. — Gen. McCook : Twenty-one for Pendleton. It is hardly worth 
while to call her. (Laughter and cheers.) 

Oregon. — Three for Pendleton. (Applause.) 

Pennsylvania. — Pennsylvania, not being ready when her name was called, 
was temporarily passed. 

Bhode Island. — Four for Doolittle. 

North Carolina. — Six for Pendleton. 

Tennessee. — Five and a half for Johnson, and four and a half for Pendleton. 
(Applause.) 

Texas. — Six for Pendleton. (Applause.) 

Vermont. — Five for Hendricks. (Great applause.) 

Virginia. — Nine and a half votes for Pendleton, one-half vote for Hancock. 

West Virginia. — Five for Pendleton. (Great applause.) 

Wisconsin. — Eight for Doolittle. 

New York. — Mr. Tildkx : Mr. President, I am instructed by the unan- 
imous vote of the New York delegation, and with the concurrence and ap- 
proval of Sanford E. Church (whom it is but justice to say the delegation 
from New York would have preferred if withiu their power to make the 
nominee) — 

Gen. McCook. — I call the gentleman to order. 

Cries of u Order ! " " Go on ! " and " Vote ! " 

Mr. Tildex. — New York casts her thirty-three votes for Thomas A. Hend- 
ricks. (Continued cheering and applause.) 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 



Ill 



The Secretary announced the vote on the eighth ballot, as follows, — 

The whole number of votes cast 317 

James E. English 6 

W. S. Hancock 28 

George H. Pendleton 156£ 

Joel Parker 7 

Sanford E. Church — * 

Asa Packer 26 

Andrew Johnson \ 6 

James R. Doolittle 12 

Thomas A. Hendricks . . 75 

Frank P. Blair £ 



EIGHTH BALLOT — RECAPITULATION. 



STATES. 


6 

a 
j 
o 

8 
5 
5 
6 
3 
3 
9 

16 

13 
8 
3 

11 
7 
7 
7 

12 
8 
4 
7 

11 
3 
3 
5 
7 

33 
9 

21 
3 

26 
4 
6 

10 
6 
5 

10 
5 
8 

317 


S3 

*6 
6 


< 
© 
© 

© 

ii 
k 

ii 
i 

2 

'.3 
1 

'« 
i 

2 

28 


© 

1 

a, 

8 
3| 

9 
16 
3£ 

8 
2 
11 

7 

14 

6 
1 

i 
7 
5 
3 
3 
li 

44 
21 
3 

6 

44 

'k 
5 

156J 


ft, 


© c 
© e 




3 N 
< 


g 

N 
© 

4 


65 
© 

§ 

§ 

*5 
3 

"94 

1 
5 

i 
1 

8 
5 

1 

3 

33 
34 

5 

75 


si 






Arkansas 


























"7 




1 






4 






















































































.. 2 


1 1 6 


8 
12 




Total 


4 




' 



112 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

A Delegate from Pennsylvania. — I move that the Convention take a recess 
for fifteen minutes. 

The motion was lost. 

Ninth Ballot. 

The Secretary called the roll of States on the ninth ballot, with the 
following result, — 

Alabama. — Eight for Pendleton. 

Arkansas. — Five for Hendricks. 

California. — Three and a half for Pendleton, one and a half for Han- 
cock. 

Connecticut. — Six for English. 

Delaico <ro . — Three for Pendleton. 

Florida. — Three for Hendricks. 

Georgia. — Nine for Pendleton. 

Illinois. — Sixteen for Pendleton. 

Indiana. — Nine and a half for Hendricks, three for Pendleton, and one-half 
declining, 

Iowa. — Eight for Pendleton. 

Kansas. — Two for Pendleton, one-half for Hendricks, one-half for Blair. 

Kentucky. — Eleven for Pendleton. 

Illinois. — Seven for Pendleton. 

Maine. — Four and a half for Hancock, one and a half for Pendleton, one 
for Hendricks. 

Maryland. — Four and a half for Pendleton, two and a half for Hendricks. 

Massachusetts. — Eleven for Hancock, and one for Pendleton. 

Michigan. — Eight for Hendricks. (Applause.) 

Minnesota. — Four for Pendleton. 

Mississippi. — Seven for Pendleton. 

Missouri. — Four for Pendleton, six for Hendricks, and one for Hancock. 

Nebraska. — Three for Pendleton. 

Nevada. — Three for Pendleton. 

New Hampshire. — One-half for Hendricks, one and a half for Pendleton, and 
three for Hancock. 

New Jersey. — Seven for Parker. 

New York. — Thirty-three for Hendricks. 

North Carolina. — Six and a half for Hendricks, one for Hancock, one for 
Pendleton, and one-half for Packer. 

Ohio. — Twenty-one for Pendleton. 

Oregon. — Three for Pendleton. 

Pennsylvania. — Twenty-six for Packer. 

Rhode Island. — Four for Doolittle. 

Soidh Carolina. — Six for Hancock. (Applause.) 

Tennessee. — Five and a half for Johnson, and four and a half for Pendleton. 

Texas. — Six for Hancock. (Applause.) 

Vermont. — Five for Hendricks. (Applause.) 

Virginia. — Nine and a half for Pendleton, and one-half vote for Hancock. 

West Virginia. — Five for Pendleton. 

Wisconsin. — Eight for Doolittle. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 



113 



The Secretary announced the vote on the ninth ballot, as follows, — 

The whole number of votes cast 3164 

James E. English 6 

W. S. Hancock 344 

George H. Pendleton 144 

Joel Parker 7 

Sanford E. Church — 

Asa Packer 264 

Andrew Johnson 54 

James R. Doolittle 12 

Thomas A. Hendricks 804 

Frank P. Blair 4 



NINTH BALLOT— RECAPITULATION. 



STATES. 


6 
ft 

a 
o 

ft 




o 

o 




g 

Si 


ft? 
g 

ft? 

ft, 


3 




ft? 


O 

O 


O 
O 
3 


'►< 


N 

ft? 




<<! 
bj 


ft? 


S3 


1 




8 
5 
5 
6 
3 
3 
9 

16 

13 
8 
3 

11 
7 
7 
7 

12 
8 
4 
7 

11 
3 
3 
5 
7 

33 
9 

21 
3 

26 
4 

. 6 

10 
6 
5 

10 
5 
8 

317 


*6 
6 


U 

'k 
ii 

i 

'3 
1 

6 
*6 

1 

1 


8 

3| 

3 

9 
16 
3 

8 
2 
11 

ih 

7 

44 

1 

4 
7 
4 
3 
3 
i| 

1 

21 
3 

n 
5 

144 


7 
7 




3 
26 

26 * 


5\ 
5} 


4 

8 
12 


5 

3 
n 

a 

1 
21 

8 

6 

1 
5 

61 1 

5 

80J 


1 

1 

5 












































































Total 








" 







*i not voting. 



114 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF TIIE 

Tenth Ballot. 

The Secretary. — The Convention will now proceed with the tenth ballot. 

Alabama. — Eight for Pendleton. 

Arkansas. — Five for Hendricks. 

California. — One and a half for Hancock; three and a half for Pendleton. 

Connecticut. — The chairman of the delegation, Mr. Eaton, announced the 
vote of the State as follows : Mr. Pendletou, three votes; Mr. English, three 
votes. 

Mr. Hovey, of Connecticut. — I rise to a point of order. Connecticut, 
if I understand it, casts six votes for James E. English. 

Mr. Eaton — I have the honor of being chairman of the Connecticut 
deb gation. I did not suppose, sir, that there was a member of that delega- 
tion who would question my integrity. 

The President. — The gentlemen will come to order. Delegations must 
settle their own questions outside of this Convention. (Loud cheers.) 

Mr. Eaton. — Mr. Chairman, when one of the delegates from my State 
rises here and charges me with a dishonorable act, I propose to vindicate my 
character. 

The President. — The gentleman will come to order. The vote of each 
State will be received through its chairman. 

Mr. Kendrick, of Connecticut. — I wish to inquire in what way we can 
have this thing rectified. 

The President. — The State of Connecticut will be passed for the moment 
until the delegation can settle this matter among themselves. The Secretary 
will call the next State. 

Delaware. — Three for Pendleton. 

Florida. — Three for Hendricks. 

Georgia. — Eight for Peudleton, and one for Hendricks. 

Illinois. — Sixteen for Pendleton. 

Indiana. — Three for Pendleton, a half for Packer, nine and a half for 
Hendricks. 

Iowa. — Eight for Pendleton. (Applause.) 

Kansas. —Two for Pendleton, one-half for Hendricks, one-half for Blair. 

Kentucky. — Eleven for Pendleton. 

Louisiana. — Seven for Pendleton. 

Maine. — Four and a half for Hancock, one and a half for Pendleton, one 
for Hendricks. 

Maryland. — Four and a half for Pendleton, two and a half for Hendricks. 

Massachusetts. — Eleven for Hancock, one for Pendleton. 

Michigan. — Eight for Hendricks. 

Minnesota. — Four for Pendleton. 

Mississippi. — Seven for Pendleton. 

Missouri. — One and a half for Hancock, four for Pendleton, one-half for 
Johnson, five for Hendricks. 

Nebraska. — Three for Pendleton. 

Nevada. — Three for Pendleton. 

Neio Hampshire. — Three for Hancock, one and a half for Pendleton, and a 
half for Hendricks. 

J\ew Jersey. — Seven for Parker. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 115 

New York. —Thirty-three for Hendricks. (Applause.) 

North Carolina. — Five and a half for Hendricks, two and a half for Pen- 
dleton, and one for Packer. 

Ohio. — Twenty-one for Pendleton. 

Oregon. — Three for Pendleton. 

Tennsylvania. — Twenty-six for Packer. 

Rhode Island. — Four for Doolittle. 

South Carolina. — Six for Hancock. 

Tennessee. — Five and a half for Johnson, and four and a half for Pendleton. 

Texas. — Six for Hancock. 

Vermont. — Five for Hendricks. 

Virginia. — Nine and a half for Pendleton, and one-half for Hancock. 

West Virginia. — Five for Pendleton. 

Wisconsin. — Eight for Doolittle. 

Connecticut. — Three for Pendleton, and three for Hendricks. 

Mr. Reeves, of Indiana. — My vote by register of the Clerk was put down 
to Mr. Packer. The chairman of the delegation announced one-half not voting. 

Mr. Fitch, Chairman of the Indiana Delegation. — The gentleman is cor- 
rect. I announced one-half not voting. 



116 



OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 



The Secretary announced the result, as follows, — 

Total number of votes cast 317 

W. S. Hancock 34 

George H. Pendleton 1474 

Joel Parker 7 

Asa Packer - 274 

Andrew Johnson 6 

James R. Doolittle 12 

Thomas A. Hendricks 824 

Prank P. Blair h 



TENTH BALLOT — RECAPITULATION. 



STATES. 



Alabama 

Arkansas 

California 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

Florida 

Georgia 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts. . . 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Nebraska , 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New York 

North Carolina .. 

Ohio 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island.. . 
South Carolina .. 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Vermont ....... 

Virginia 

West Virginia.. 
Wisconsin , 

Total 



317 



31 



147? 



273 



82| 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 



117 



Eleventh Ballot. 

The Secretaiy called the roll of the States as follows, — 

Alabama. — Eight for Pendleton. 

Arkansas. — Five for Hendricks. 

California. — Three for Pendleton, one for Hendricks, eleven for Hancock. 

Connecticut. — Three for Pendleton, three for Hendricks. 

Delaware. — Three for Pendleton. 

Florida. — Three for Hendricks. 

Georgia. — Eight for Pendleton, one for Hendricks. 

Illinois. — Sixteen for Pendleton. 

Indiana. — Nine and a half for Hendricks, three for Pendleton. 

Joica. — Eight for Pendleton. 

Kansas. — Two for Pendleton, two and a half for Hendricks, and one-half 
for Blair. 

Kentucky. — Eleven for Pendleton. 

Louisiana. — Seven for Pendleton. 

Maine. — Four and a half for Hancock, one and a half for Pendleton, one 
for Hendricks. 

Maryland. — Four and a half for Pendleton, two and a half for Hendricks. 

Massachusetts. — Eleven for Hancock, one for Pendleton. 

Michigan. — Eight for Hendricks. 

Minnesota. — Four for Pendleton. 

Mississippi. — Seven for Pendleton. 

Missouri. — Four for Pendleton, six for Hendricks, and one for Hancock. 

Nebraska. — Three for Pendleton. 

Nevada. — Three for Pendleton. 

New Hampshire. — One-half for Hendricks, one-half for Doolittle, one and a 
half for Pendleton, and two and a half for Hancock. 

New Jersey. — Seven for Parker. 

New York. — Mr. Mullix: thirty-three for Thomas A. Hendricks. (Great 
applause.) 

North Carolina. — Nine for Hendricks. (Great applause.) 

Ohio. — Twenty-one for Pendleton. 

Oregon. — Three for the " Youug Greenback of the West," Geo. H. Pen- 
dleton. (Cheers and laughter.) 

Pennsylvania. — Twenty-six for Packer. 

Rhode Island. — Four for Doolittle. (Applause.) 

South Carolina. — Six for Hancock. 

Tennessee. — Five and a half for Johnson, four and a half for Pendleton. 

Texas. — Six for Hendricks. 

Vermont. — Five for Hendricks. (Applause.) 

Virginia. — Nine and a half for Pendleton, one and a half for Hancock. 

West Virginia. — Five for Pendleton. 
Wisconsin. — Eight for Doolittle. 



118 



OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 



The Secretary announced the result, as follows, — 

Total number of votes cast 316£ 

W. S. Hancock 32-i 

George H. Pendleton 144£ 

Joel Parker 7 

Asa Packer • 26 

Andrew Johnson 5j 

James R. Doolittle 124 

Thomas A. Hendricks 88 

Frank P. Blair h 



ELEVENTH BALLOT — RECAPITULATION. 



STATES. 



Alabama 

Arkansas 

California 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

Florida 

Georgia 

Illinois 

Indiana* 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts.. . 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire. 

New Jersey 

New York 

North Carolina .. 

Ohio 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania.... 
Rhode" Island. . . . 
South Carolina . . 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Vermont 

Virginia 

"West Virginia... 
Wisconsin 



4 
7 

11 
3 
3 
5 
7 

33 
9 

21 
3 

26 
4 
6 

10 
6 
5 

10 
5 
8 



ii 



Total , 



317 



32.i 



26 



* j not voting. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 119 

Twelfth Ballot. 

The Secretary then called the roll of States on the twelfth ballot, 
as follows, — 
Alabama. — Eight for Pendleton. 
Arkansas. — Five for Hendricks. 
California. — One and a half for Hendricks, and one-half for Chase. 

At the announcement of the half vote for Salmon P. Chase, pro- 
longed cheering rose from the galleries and hall. As it began to sub 
side, several hisses were heard, which immediately caused a more 
enthusiastic renewal of the applause, which continued for several 
minutes. 

Mr. Littleton Cooke, of Kentucky, moved that the galleries be 
cleared. 

A Delegate, from Wisconsin. — Mr. President, the galleries are filled with 
people, some of whom have come two thousand miles to witness the proceedings 
of the Convention. They are good Democrats, and they have a right to 
applaud when they please. (Great cheering in the galleries, and to some 
extent on the floor.) We depend on these people to elect our ticket, and they 
have a right to cheer for any one. (Cheers.) 

Mr. Clark, of Massachusetts. — Mr. President, as a member of the Massa- 
chusetts delegation, I must coincide with the gentleman who has just spoken. 
Those men in the galleries have come, some of them, a great distance to wit- 
ness our deliberations. 

The President pro. tern. — The Chair will state that every effort will be 
made by the ushers and the marshals to preserve order. The Chair has no 
power to suppress cheers, only hissing and bad conduct. The Chair would 
suggest to the lobby both below and above, that they endeavor to suppress 
these demonstrations when the votes are given. I make it as an earnest 
request. 

Order being restored, the Secretary stated that, in addition to the 
vote of California already announced, that State gave three votes for 
Pendleton. (Cheers). 

The call of the roll then proceeded. 

Connecticut. — Three for Pendleton, three for Hendricks. 

Delaware. — Three for Pendleton. 

Florida. — Three for Hendricks. 

Georgia. — Nine for Pendleton. 

Illinois. — Sixteen for Pendleton. 

Indiana. — Nine and a half votes for Hendricks, three for Pendleton, one- 
half declining. 

Iowa. — Eight for Pendleton. 

Kansas. — Two for Pendleton, one-half for Hendricks, one-half for Blair. 

Kentucky. — Eleven for Pendleton. 

Louisiana. — Seven votes for Pendleton. 

Maine. — Four and a half for Hancock, one and a half for Pendleton, 
and one for Hendricks. 



120 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

Maryland. — Four and a half for Pendleton, two and a half for Hendricks. 

Massachusetts. — Eleven for Hancock, and one for Pendleton. 

Michigan. — Eight for Hendricks. 

Minnesota. — Four for Pendleton. 

Mississippi. — Seven for Pendleton. 

Missouri. — Four for Pendleton, seven for Hendricks. 

Nebraska. — Three for Pendleton. 

Nevada. — Three for Pendleton. 

Neio Hampshire. — One-half for Doolittle, one for Hendricks, one and a half 
for Pendleton ; and two for Hancock. 

New Jersey. — Seven for Parker. 

New York. — Thirty-three for Hendricks. 

North Carolina. — Nine for Hendricks. 

Ohio. — Twenty-one for Pendleton. 

Oregon. — Three for Pendleton. 

Pennsylvania. — Twenty-six for Packer. 

Rhode Island. — Four for Hancock. 

South Carolina. — Six for Hancock. 

Tennessee. — Four and a half for Johnson, four *ud a half for Pendle- 
ton, and one for MeClellan. (Cheers and great apriause.) 

Texas. — Six for Hancock. 

Vermont. — Five for Hendricks. 

Virginia. — Nine and a half for Pendleton, and one-half for Hancock. 

West Virginia. — Five for Pendleton. 

Wisconsin. — Eight for Doolittle. 

Mr. Woodward, of Pennsylvania. — The Pennsylvania delegation ask leave 
to retire. 

There being no objection, leave was granted. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 



121 



The Secretary announced the result of the vote, as follows, — 

The whole number of votes cast 316i 

W. S. Hancock 30 

George H. Pendleton 14o£ 

Joel Parker 7 

Asa Packer 26 

Andrew Johnson 4£ 

James K. Doolittle 12£ 

Thomas A. Hendricks 89 

Frank P. Blair h 

S.P.Chase h. 

G. B. McClellan 1 



T W" ELFTH BALLOT — RECAPITULATION. 



STATES. 



Alabama 

Arkansas 

California 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

Florida 

Georgia 

Illinois 

Indiana* 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts .. 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New York 

North Carolina .. 

Ohio 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Khode Island — 
South Carolina.. 

Tennessee , 

Texas , 

Vermont 

Virginia 

West Virginia .. 
Wisconsin 



Total 



145? 



26 



'JO 



12| 89 



* j not voting. 



122 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

Mr. White, of Maryland. — I move that the Convention take a recess for 
fifteen minutes for consultation. 

Mr. Vallandigiiam. — 1 move to amend by making the recess thirty min- 
utes. 

The amendment was carried, and the Convention took a recess of 
thirty minutes. 

During the recess the audience in the gallery recognized the Hon. 
D. W. Voorhies on the floor, and began calling for him. 

Mr. Voorhies appeared on the platform, and was greeted with 
loud cheers. He said, — 

Gentlemen of the Convention, it would be so manifestly improper at this 
time to indulge in any remarks to you, that I only appear before you to bow 
my acknowledgments in return for the compliment of your call. 

Cries of " Good ! good ! " from delegates, and cheers. 

Thirteenth Ballot. 

After the recess, the Convention proceeded to vote on the thir- 
teenth ballot, with the following result, — 

Alabama. — Eight for Pendleton. 

Arkansas. — Five for Hendricks. 

California. — The Chairman of the Delegation: Pass California for the 
present. 

Connecticut. — The Chairman of the Delegation : Pass Connecticut. 

Delaware. — Three for Pendleton. 

Florida. — Three for Hendricks. 

Georgia. —The Chairman of the Delegation : Pass Georgia for the present. 

Illinois. — Sixteen for Pendleton. 

Indiana. — Nine and a half for Hendricks, and three for Pendleton. 

Iowa. — Eight for Pendleton. 

Kansas. — Two votes for Pendleton, one-half vote for Hendricks, and one- 
half vote for Blair. 

Kentucky. — Eleven for Pendleton. 

Louisiana. — Seven for Pendleton. 

Maine. — Four and a half for Hancock, one and a half for Pendleton, and 
one for Hendricks. 

Maryland. — Foot and a half for Pendleton, and two and a half for Hen- 
dricks. 

Massachusetts. — Eleven for Hancock, and one for Pendleton. 

Michigan. — Eight votes for Hendricks. 

Minnesota. — Four votes for Pendleton. 

Mississippi. — Seven votes for Pendleton. 

Missouri. — The Chairman of the Delegation: Pass Missouri. 

Nebraska. — Three for Pendleton. 

Nevada. — Three for Pendleton. 

New Hampshire. — There being no response to the call, New Hampshire 
was passed. 

New Jersey. — Seven for Parker. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 123 

New York. — Thirty-three for Hendricks. 

North Carolina. — Nine for Hancock. 

Ohio. — Twenty-one for Pendleton. 

Oregon. — Three for Pendleton. 

Pennsylvania. — Twenty-six for Packer. 

Rhode Island. — Four for Doolittle. 

South Carolina. — Six for Hancock. 

Tennessee. — Four and a half for Johnson, four and a half for Pendleton, 
and one for Franklin Pierce. 

Texas. — Six for Hancock. 

Vermont. — Five for Hendricks. 

Virginia. — Ten for Hancock. (Applause.) 

West Virginia. — Four for Pendleton, and one for Hendricks. (Applause.) 

Wisconsin. — Eight for Doolittle. 

California. — One-half for Chase, three for Pendleton, one and a half for 
Hendricks. (Applause.) 

Connecticut. Three for Pendleton, three for Hendricks. 

Georgia. — Seven and a half for Pendleton, one and a half for Hendricks. 

Missouri. — Five for Pendleton, six for Hendricks. 

Nexo Hampshire. — One-half for Hendricks, one for Doolittle, one and a 
half for Pendleton, two for Hancock. 



124 



OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 



The Secretary announced the result of the vote, as follows, - 

The whole number of votes cast 3164 

W. S. Hancock •• 484 

George IT. Pendleton 1344 

Joel Parker 7 

Asa Packer 2G 

Andrew Johnson 44 

James R. Doolittle 13 

Thomas A. Hendricks 81 

Frank P. Blair 4 

S. P. Chase 4 

Franklin Pierce 1 



THIRTEENTH BALLOT — RECAPITULATION. 



STATES. 



Alabama 

Arkansas 

California 

Connecticut — 

Delaware 

Florida 

Georgia 

Illinois 

Indiana* 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Blaine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts . 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 
New Jersey. . . . 

New York 

North Carolina 

Ohio 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania .. 
Rhode Island .. 
South Carolina 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Vermont 

Virginia 

West Virginia . 
Wisconsin 

Total 



317 



H 



1341 



* £ not voting. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 125 

Fourteenth Ballot. 

The Secretary. — The Convention will now proceed with the fourteenth 
ballot. 

The roll was called as follows, — 

Alabama. — Eight for Pendleton. 

Arkansas. — Five for Hendricks. 

California. — Four for Pendleton, one for Hendricks. 

Connecticut. — Three for Pendleton, three for Hendricks. 

Delaware. — Three for Pendleton. 

Florida. — Three for Hendricks. 

Georgia. — The Chairman of the Delegation: Pass Georgia. 

Illinois. — Sixteen for Pendleton. 

Indiana. — Nine and a half for Hendricks, three for Pendleton. 

Iowa. — Eight for Pendleton. 

Kansas. — Two and a half for Hendricks, and one-half for Pendleton. 

Kentucky. — Eleven for Pendleton. 

Louisiana. — Seven for Pendleton. 

Maine. — Four and a half for Hancock, one and a half for Pendleton, and 
one for Hendricks. 

Maryland. — Five for Pendleton, and two for Hendricks. 

Massachusetts. — Eleven for Hancock, and one for Pendleton. 

Michigan. — Eight for Hendricks. 

Minnesota. — Four for Pendleton. 

Mississi£>pi. — Seven for Pendleton. 

Missouri. — Four for Pendleton, five for Hendricks, and two for Hancock. 

Nebraska. — The Chairman of the Delegation : Pass Nebraska. 

Nevada. — Three for Pendleton. 

New Hampshire. — One-half for Hendricks, one for Doolittle, one and a 
half for Pendleton, and two for Hancock. 

New Jersey. — Seven for Parker. 

Neto York. — Thirty-three for Hendricks. 

North Carolina. — Nine for Hancock. 

Ohio. — Twenty-one for Pendleton. 

Oregon. — Three for Pendleton. 

Pennsylvania. — Twenty-six for Packer. 

Hhode Island. — Four for Doolittle. 

South Carolina. — Six for Hancock. 

Tennessee. — Five and a half for Hancock, and five . and a half for Pen- 
dleton. 

Texas. — Six for Hancock. 

Vermont. — Five for Hendricks. 

Virginia. — Ten for Hancock. 

West Virginia. — Four for Pendleton, and one for Hendricks. 

Wisco7isin. — Eight for Doolittle. 

Georgia. — Seven for Pendleton, and two for Hendricks. 

Nebraska. — Three for Hendricks. 



126 



OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 



The Secretary announced the result, as follows, — 

Total number of votes cast 316£ 

W. S. Hancock 56 

George H. Pendleton 130 

Joel Parker 7 

Asa Packer 26 

James K. Doolittle 13 

Thomas A. Hendricks 84£ 



FOURTEENTH BALLOT — RECAPITULATION. 



STATES. 



Alabama 

Arkansas 

California 

Connecticut — 

Delaware 

]■ lorlda 

Georgia 

Illinois 

Indiana* 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana . 

Maine , 

Mar] land 

Massachusetts... 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire, 

New Jersey 

New York 

North Carolina .. 

Ohio 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania — 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina .. 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Vermont 

Virginia 

AVest Virginia... 
Wisconsin 

Total 



317 



56 



e$ 


a? 


r^ 


1*5 


k 


-) 


a* 


o 


^ 


^ 


&< 


a, 



7 26 



13 



33 



m 



* J not voting. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. I'll 

The Fifteenth Ballot. 

The Secretary called the roll of States for the fifteenth ballot, 
with the following result, — 

Alabama. — Eight for Pendleton. 

Arkansas. — Five for Hendricks. 

California. — Three for Pendleton, one and a half for Hendricks, one- 
half not voting. 

Connecticut. — Three for Pendleton, three for Hancock. 

Delaware. — Three for Pendleton. 

Florida. — Three for Hendricks. 

Georgia. — Seven for Pendleton, two for Hendricks. 

Illinois. — Sixteen for Pendleton. 

Indiana. — Nine and a half for Hendricks, three for Pendleton, one-half 
not voting. 

Iowa. — Eight for Pendleton. 

Kansas. — Two and a half votes for Hendricks, one-half for Pendleton. 

Kentucky. — Eleven for Pendleton. 

Louisiana. — Seven for r Pendleton. 

Maine. — Four and a half for Hancock, one and a half for Pendleton, one 
for Hendricks. 

Maryland. — Four and a half for Pendleton. 

Massachusetts. — Two and a half for Hendricks, eleven for Hancock, one 
for Pendleton. 

Michigan. — Eight for Hendricks. 

Minnesota. — Four for Pendleton. 

Mississippi. — The Chairman of the Delegation : The delegation from Mis- 
sissippi asks time for consultation. 

The President. — If there is no objection it will be granted. 

Missouri. — Five for Pendleton, five for Hendricks, two for Hancock. 

Nebraska. — Three for Hendricks. 

Nevada. — Three for Pendleton. 

New Hampshire. — One-half for Hendricks, eleven and a half for Pendleton, 
and three for Hancock. (Applause.) 

New Jersey. — Seven for Parker. 

New York. — Thirty-three for Hendricks. 

North Carolina. — Nine for Hancock. 

Ohio. — Twenty-one for Pendleton. 

Oregon. — Three for Pendleton. 

Pennsylvania. — Pennsylvania was out for consultation. 

Bhode Island. — Four for Doolittle. 

North Carolina. — Six for Hancock. (Applause.) 

Tennessee. — Five and a half for Johnson, and four and a half for Pendleton. 

Texas. — Six for Hancock. 

Vermont. — Five for Hendricks. 

Virginia. — Ten for Hancock. 

West Virginia. — Four for Pendleton, and one for Hendricks. 

Wisconsin. — Eight for James R. Doolittle. 

Mississippi. — Seven for Pendleton. 



128 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

At this point the Penns3ivania delegation returned. 

The Chairman of the Delegation. — The delegation from Pennsylvania, 
having supported the man of their choice iu several unsuccessful ballots, 
have instructed their chairman to cast the twenty-six votes of the State of 
Pennsylvania for Gen. Winfield Scott Hancock. 

Vociferous applause in the galleries. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 



129 



The Secretary announced the result, as follows, — 

Total number of votes cast 316 

W. S. Hancock 79£ 

George H. Pendleton 129£ 

Joel Parker 7 

Andrew Johnson 5£ 

James li. Doolittle 12 

Thomas A. Hendricks 82i 



FIFTEENTH BALLOT — RECAPITULATION. 



STATES. 



Alabama 

Arkansas 

California* 

Connecticut .... 

Delaware 

Florida 

Georgia 

Illinois 

Indiana* 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana , 

Maine 

Maryland , 

Massachusetts. . . 

Michigan , 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire, 

New Jersey , 

New York , 

North Carolina .. 

Ohio 

•Oregon 

Pennsylvania — 
Rhode Island.... 
South Carolina .. 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Vermont 

Virginia 

West Virginia... 
Wisconsin 

Total 



317 



4 



:■.>', 



1293 



m 



* 5 not voting. 



130 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

Sixteenth Ballot, 

The Secretary then called the roll, as follows, — 

Alabama. — Eight for Pendleton. 

Arkansas. — Five for Hancock. 

California. — Three for Pendleton, one and a half for Hendricks ; one-half 
not voting. 

Connecticut. — Three for Pendleton, and three for Hancock. 

Delaware. — Three for Pendleton. 

Florida. — Two for Hendricks and one for Pendleton. 

Georgia. — Two and a half for Pendleton, six and a half for Hancock. 

Illinois. — The Chairman of the Delegation : Illinois casts her sixteen votes 
for Pendleton, and requests leave to retire for deliberation. 

Permission being granted, the delegation withdrew from the hall. 

Indiana. — Nine and a half for Hendricks, three and a half for Pendleton. 

Iowa. — Eight for Pendleton. 

Kansas. — Two for Hendricks, and one for Hancock. 

Kentucky. — Eleven for Pendleton. 

Louisiana. — Seven for Hancock. (Cheers.) 

Maine. — Four and a half for Hancock, one and a half for Pendleton, one 
for Hendricks. 

Maryland. — The Chairman of the Delegation : Pass Maryland for the present. 

Massachusetts. — Eleven votes for Hancock, and one for Pendleton. 

Michigan. — Eight for Hendricks. 

Minnesota. — Four for Pendleton. 

Mississippi. — Seven for Hancock. (Cheers.) 

Missouri. — Five for Pendleton, three for Hendricks, and three for Han- 
cock. (Applause.) 

Nebraska. — Three for Thomas A. Hendricks. 

Nevada. — Three for Pendleton. 

New Hampshire. — One-half for Hendricks, one and a half for Pendleton, 
three for Hancock. (Applause.) 

New Jersey. — The Chairman of the Delegation : New Jersey still casts her 
seven votes for Joel Parker. (Laughter.) 

New York. — The Chairman of the Delegation : New York casts her thirty- 
three votes for Hendricks. 

North Carolina. — Nine for Hancock. 

Ohio. — Twenty-one votes for Pendleton. 

Oregon. — Three for Pendleton. 

Pennsylvania. — Twenty-six for Hancock. (Applause.) 

Bhode Island. — Four for Doolittle. 

South Carolina. — Six for Hancock. 

Tennessee. — Five and a half for Johnson, four and a half for Pendleton. 

Texas. — Six for Hancock. 

Vermont. — Five for Hendricks. 

Virginia. — Ten for Hancock. 

West Virginia. — Three and a half for Pendleton, one and a half for Hendricks. 

Wisconsin. — Eight for Doolittle. 

Maryland. — One-half for Hendricks, one for Pendleton, five and a half for 
Hancock. (Cheers.) 



NATIONAL DEMOCIiATlC CONVENTION. 



131 



The Secretary announced the result of the vote, as follows, - 

The whole number of votes cast 316 

W. S. Hancock n ^- 

George II. Pendleton 107 ^ 

Joel Parker 7 

Asa Packer 

Andrew Johnson 6 i 

James R. Doolittle 12 

Thomas A. Hendricks 70£ 

Frank P. Blair •. — 

S. P. Chase — 



SIXTEENTH BALLOT — RECAPITULATION. 



STATES. 



Alabama 

Arkansas 

California* 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

Florida 

Georgia 

Illinois 

Indiana* 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts . . 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri * 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New York 

North Carolina . 

Ohio 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania ■•■ 
Khode" Island ... 
South Carolina. 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Vermont 

Virginia 

West Virginia.. 
Wisconsin 

Total 



317 



iia 



107. 



&5 


ft5 


< 


ftq 


< 


N 


fti 





^ 


^ 


ft, 





12 



70] 



' \ not voting. 



132 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

Mr. Stanton, of Kentucky. — The delegation from Kentucky asks leave to 
retire for consultation. 

Mr. Blaxcuard. — I move that the Convention now take a recess until five 
o'clock. 

Cries of " No, no." Lost. 

Mr. Tildex, of New York. — The New York delegation ask leave to go 
out to consult. 

The President. — As three delegations are out, it is useless to weary the 
Secretary with calling the roll until they return. 

The Secretary. — By announcement of the President, the business of the 
Convention will now be suspended until the three delegations from Ken- 
tucky, Illinois, and New York return. 

A Delegate. — Fix the time. 

Another Delegate. — Make it ten minutes. 

The Secretary. — A l-ccess of ten minutes is called for. 

Cries of " No, no." 

The President. — The Chair will remind the delegates, who are tenacious 
that .something should be done, to remember the Secretaries, whose duties 
are very onerous : a recess of ten minutes will be allowed for them to rest. 

The Convention took a recess for ten minutes, after which the 
Secretary announced that they would proceed to vote on the 

Seventeenth Ballot. 

Alabama. — Eight for Hancock. (Loud Applause.) 
Arkansas. — Five for Hancock. (Applause.) 

California. — Three for Pendleton, one and a half for Hancock, and one-half 
for Chase. (Laughter and cheers.) 

Connecticut. — Three for Pendleton, three for Hancock. (Applause.) 

Delaware. — Three for Pendleton. 

Florida. — Three for Hendricks. 

Georgia. — Nine for Gen. Hancock. (Applause.) 

The Secretary of the Convention said that the delegation from Il- 
linois was out, and proceeded to the roll-call. 

Indiana. — Ten for Hendricks, and three for Pendleton. 

Iowa. — Eight votes for Pendleton. 

Kansas. — Two for Hendricks, one for Hancock. • 

The Kentucky delegation being out, the ballot continued. 

Louisiana. — Seven for Hancock. ( Applause.) 

Maine. — Four and a half for Hancock, one and a half for Pendleton, one 
for Hendricks. 

Maryland. — Hendricks one, Hancock six. (Applause.) 

Massachusetts'. — Eleven for Hancock and one for Peudleton (Cheers.) 

Michigan. — Eight for Hendricks. 

Minnesota. — Two for Pendleton and two for Hancock. (Applause.) 

Mississippi. — vSeven for Hancock. 

Missouri. — Missouri did not respond ; the Secretary passed to the next 
State on the list. 

Nebraska nominates John T. Hoffman. 

Nebraska. — Chairman of the Delegation : I am instructed by the Nebraska 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. loo 

delegation to cast her vote for that gallant Chief of the Tammany Democ- 
racy, John T. Hoffman, of New York. (Loud cheers.) 

Nevada. — Three for Pendleton. 

Net/o Hampshire. — Five for Hancock. 

New Jersey. — Seven for Parker. (Laughter.) 

New York. — Thirty-three for Hendricks. (Applause.) 

North Carolina. — Nine for Hancock. (Applause.) 

Ohio. —Twenty-one for Pendleton. 

Oregon. — Twenty-one for Pendleton. (Loud laughter.) 

The Secretary of the Convention — The State of Oregon casts her three 
votes — instead of twenty-one — for Pendleton. (Laughter.) 

Pennsylvania. — Twenty-six for Hancock. (Applause.) 

Rhode Island. — Four for Doolittle. 

South Carolina. — Six for Hancock. 

Tennessee. — Five and a half for Johnson, four and a half for Pendleton. 

Texas. — Six for Hancock. 

Vermont. — Five for Hendricks. 

Virginia. — Ten for Hancock. 

West Virginia. — Three for Hancock, one for Pendleton, one for Hendricks. 

Wisconsin. — Eight for Doolittle. 

Illinois. — Eight and a half for Pendleton, one-half for Andrew Johnson, 
and seven for Hendricks. 

Kentucky and Missouri. — The Secretary called the States of Kentucky and 
Missouri, but their delegations had not yet returned, having retired for con- 
sultation. 

Mr. Tilden, of New York. — The Convention, in prosecution of its monoto- 
nous duties, has reached a point where it is evident to all the members en- 
trusted with this importaut work, that they should pause aud consider. 

Numerous Delegates. — No ! No ! 

Mr. Tilden. — A little time is but of little moment. It is of vast moment 
that we act wisely and well in the position to which we have arrived. I 
therefore move, for the purpose of enabling the delegates to have an oppor- 
tunity for consultation and reflection, that the Convention do now adjourn. 

Mr. Vallandigham, of Ohio. — I second the motion to adjourn. 

A Delegate. — What becomes of the vote which has just been taken? 

The President. — The proposition is that the Convention adjourn when the 

Kentucky and Missouri delegations return and vote, and the vote is announced. 

Mr. Clymer, of Pennsylvania. — On that motion I call for a vote by States. 

The President. — Those in favor of the motion to adjourn when the dele- 
gations from Kentucky and Missouri return, will, when their names are called, 
answer in the affirmative ; those opposed, in the negative. 

A Delegate. — It will require five minutes at least for the different dele- 
gations to decide how they will vote. 

The President. — The delegates are allowed five minutes to consult with 
each other under the rule. 

Missouri. — The Missouri delegation having returned to the hall, the chair- 
man of the delegation voted seven for Hendricks and four for Hancock. 

Kentucky. — The Kentucky delegation having returned, the chairman of 
the delegation voted five votes for Geo. H. Pendleton, five for Gen. Hancock, 
one-half for Hendricks, aud one-half not voting. 



134 



OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 



The Secretary announced the result, as follows, — 

Total number of votes cast 31GJ 

W. S. Hancock 1374 

George H. Pendleton 70£ 

Joel Parker 7 

Andrew Johnson 6 

James R. Doolittle 12 

Thomas A. Hendricks 80 

S. P. Chase £ 

John T. Hoffman 3 



SEVENTEENTH BALLOT — RECAPITULATION. 



STATES. 



Alabama 

Arkansas 

California 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

Florida 

< ieorfrfa 

Illinois ■ 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky* 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Mar] land 

Massachusei ts... 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire. 

New Jersey 

New York 

North Carolina . . 
Ohio 

< Oregon 

Pennsylvania. . . . 
Rhode Island.... 
South Carolina .. 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Vermont 

Virginia 

West Virginia... 
Wisconsin 



26 



33 



Total . 



317 



70\ 



'*£ not voting. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 



135 



The vote was then taken by States on the motion of Mr. Tilden to 
adjourn, and it was lost by the following vote, — 



Alabama 8 

Arkansas ....••• .... 5 

California 5 

Connecticut 6 

Delaware 3 

Florida 3 

Georgia 9 

Illinois 16 

Indiana 13 

Iowa 8 

Kansas 3 

Kentucky 11 

Louisiana 7 

Maine 7 

Massachusetts 12 

Maryland 7 

Michigan 8 

Minnesota 4 

Mississippi 7 

Missouri 11 



r eas. 


Nays 


— 


8 


5 


— 


5 


— 


— 


6 


U 


14 


— 


3 


— 


9 


— 


16 



13 — 



— 3 
11 — 

— 7 
2 5 

— 12 

— 7 



4 

7 

11 



Yea?. 
3 
3 



Nays. 



— 7 

33 — 



Nebraska 3 

Nevada 3 

New Hampshire 5 

New Jersey 7 

New York 33 

North Carolina 9 

Ohio 21 

Oregon 3 

Pennsylvania 26 

Rhode Island 4 

South Carolina 6 

Tennessee 10 

Texas 6 

Vermont 5 

Virginia 10 

West Virginia 5 

Wisconsin 8 



Total 1424 1"44 



21 


— 


3 


— 


— 


26 


4 


— 


— 


6 


— 


10 


— 


6 


4 


1 


10 


— 



Mr. Latroop, of New Jersey, moved that the Convention, take a 
recess until seven o'clock. 
The motion was lost. 
The President. — We will now proceed with the eighteenth ballot. 

Eighteenth Ballot. 

Alabama. — Eight for Hancock. (Applause.) 

Arkansas. — Five for Hancock. 

California. — Three for Pendleton, oue and a half for Hancock, one-half for 
Chase. 

Connecticut. — Three for Pendleton, three for Hancock. 

Delaware. — Two for Pendleton, one for Hancock. (Applause.) 

Illinois. — Mr. Richardson : Mr. President, the State of Illinois instructed 
her delegates to cast their vote as a unit. On the last ballot, I yielded to the 
casting of their individual votes. The vote is adverse to ray opinion ; but I 
nevertheless cast her sixteen votes for Mr. Hendricks. (Applause.) 

Mr. Malonev, of Illinois. — I want that corrected. I want to give my 
vote for Pendleton. 

The President. — We will pass Illinois for the present. 

Indiana. — Ten for Hendricks, three for Pendleton. 

Iowa. — Eight for Pendleton. 

Kansas. — Two for Hendricks, one for Hancock. 

Kentucky. — Four and a half for Pendleton, four and a half for Hancock, 
two for Hendricks. 

Louisiana. — Seven for Hancock. 

Maine. — Four and a half for Hancock, one and a half for Pendleton, one 
for Hendricks. 

Maryland. — Six and a half for Hancock, one and a half for Hendricks. 

Massachusetts. — Eleven for Hancock, one for Pendleton. 

Michigan. — Eight for Hendricks. 



136 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

Minnesota. — Two for Pendleton, two for Hancock. 

Mississippi. — Seven for Hancock. 

Missouri. — Four for Hendricks, seven for Hancock. (Applause.) 

Nebraska. — Three for Hoffman. 

Nevada. — Three for Pendleton. 

New Hampshire. — One-half for Hendricks, one for Pendleton, and three and 
a half for Hancock. 

New Jersey. — Three and a half for Parker, three for Hancock, and one-half 
for Pendleton. 

New York. — Thirty-three for Hendricks. 

North Carolina. — Nine for Hancock. 

Ohio. — Twenty-one for Pendleton. 

Pennsylvania. — Twenty-six for Hancock. (Cheers.) 

Rhode Island. — Four for Doolittle. 

South Carolina. — Six for Hancock. 

Tennessee. — The Chairman of the Delegation: The State of Tennessee, 
faithful to him who has ever been faithful to our country, casts her united 
vote for Andrew Johnson. (Cheers.) 

Texas. — Six for Hancock. 

Vermont. — Five for Hendricks. 

Virginia. — Ten for Hancock. 

West Virginia. — Five for Hendricks. 

Wisconsin. — Eight for Doolittle. 

Illinois. — Sixteen for Hendricks. 

Mr. Maloxy, of Illinois.— I want to correct that vote. I want my vote 
cast for George H. Pendleton, of Ohio. 

The Phesidknt. — That is a question you must settle among yourselves. 

Axothek Delegate. — There is among the delegates from Illinois — 

Cries of " Order ! " 

The gentleman made a further effort to speak, but his voice was 
drowned by cries of " Order !" 

Mr. Maloxy, of Illinois. — Mr. President : I offer, sir, one-half of the votes 
of the second district of Illinois (Cries of "Order"!) for the able defender 
(Cheers and cries of " Order"!) of the Constitution and of the Union. The 
chairman of the Illinois delegation is not authorized to speak for me here, or 
for my district. 

The Pkesidext. — The Secretary will now announce the result of the last 
ballot. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 



137 



The Secretary announced the result of the vote, as follows, — 

The whole number of votes cast 317 

W. S. Hancock 1444 

George H. Pendleton 564 

Joel Parker 34 

Andrew Johnson 10 

James R. Doolittle 12 

Thomas A. Hendricks 87 

John T. Hoffinan 3 

S. P. Chase 4 

Asa Packer — 



EIGHTEENTH BALLOT — RECAPITULATION. 



STATES. 



Alabama 

Arkansas 

California , 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

Florida 

Georgia 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts .. 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New York' 

North Carolina . 

Ohio 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania ... 
Ithode" Island . .. 
South Carolina. 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Vermont 

Virginia 

"West Virginia .. 
Wisconsin 

Total 



317 144£ 



5<V. 



10 



138 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

Mr. Malony, of Illiuois. — Mr. President : I have a proposition to make, — 
a motion to submit to the Convention. My motion is this : That every gen- 
tleman who has credentials entitling him to a seat on this floor shall be en- 
titled to represent, by vote and voice, the district that iu part sent him here. 

Applause, and cries of " Take your seat ! " and " Order !" 

The President. — The gentleman from Illinois (Mr. Malony), if the Chair 
understands his proposition, moves that each delegate shall have a right to 
vote as he sees fit upon each nomination. The rule already adopted by the 
Convention is this : That when the nominations are made, each delegation is 
to vote through its chairman. That is uovv the rule of the Convention. The 
motion, therefore, of the geutleman from Illinois is a motion to change the 
rules of the Convention and the order of its proceedings. This can be done 
only upon one day's notice, if any objections are made to such change. More 
than that, the Chair will state that it understands (and I think iu every Con- 
vention I have attended), when the question has been raised touching the 
votes of the delegates, it has always been decided that each delegation has a 
right to decide for itself how it would act as a whole. That was the decision 
of the Convention which met in Baltimore. 

A Delegate from California. — I object to the proposed change. 

Mr. Malony. — Do I understand the Chair, then, to decide that I, who 
differ from the expressed vote of the chairman of the Illinois delegation, must 
permit his vote to be taken here and not mine? 

The President. — The rule already adopted by the Convention will be read 
by the Secretary, whose voice is so much clearer than my own, that the Con- 
vention will better understand it than if I state it. 

Mr. Bayard, of Delaware. — I understand the rule of the Convention to be 
that the chairman is to announce the vote of each delegation. 

The President.— It is. 

Mr. Bayard. — Does that involve the principle that individual members 
are to be here as mere agents of the majority and not of the people they rep- 
resent? I think not. I suppose this to be a deliberative body, as much so 
as is the House of Representatives; and I should think it just as rational 
that a majority of the members of the House of Representatives should un- 
dertake to control the individual opinions of the representatives, as that a 
majority of a delegation should undertake here to control the individual 
opinion of any member of this Convention. Such delegation is no longer a 
representative of the sentiment of the people of the State, if such a principle 
is permitted to govern its action. It would be nothing more than a mode by 
which faction and personal combinations might override public sentiment. 

The Clerk then read the rule already adopted b}' the Convention, 

as follows, — 

Besolred, That, in casting their votes for President and Vice-President, each 
chairman of each delegation shall rise in his place and name how the delega- 
tion votes. 

Mr. Clymer. — Mr. President, this Convention adopted the rules which 
governed the Convention at Chicago ; that Convention adopted the rules of 
the Conventions which sat at Charleston and at Baltimore. At Charleston 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 139 

there was a rule reported for the government of the Convention upon this sub- 
ject, which was adopted by the Convention, and that rule is this, — 

"That in any State which lias not provided or directed by its State Con- 
vention how its vote shall be given, the Convention will recoguize the right 
of each delegate to cast his individual vote." 

I have thought it my duty to bring to the knowledge of the President of the 
Convention this rule. 

Mr. Malont. — Mr. President, I surrendered the floor only out of compli- 
ment to the gentleman from Pennsylvania, and I now claim my right to be 
hoard. 

Cries of " Order ! " 

The President. — The Clerk will first read the rule submitted by the gen- 
tleman from Pennsylvania. 

The Clerk again read the rule to which attention was called b} 7 Mr. 
Clymer. 

Mr. Malony. — Mr. President : Under that rule, which vindicates the right 
of every district in this broad country to give an expression, through its del- 
egates sent here, of its wishes in regard to the nominations made, and in 
defiance of the attempt of the chairman of the Illinois delegation to gag down 
my district, I give one-half vote for the ablest defender of the Constitution, 
for the man who has clone more to vindicate the unity of our government, and 
the polity and sovereignty of its States under the Constitution of our coun- 
try than any other living man. (Great applause.) 

The President. — The Chair wishes to inquire of the chairman of the Illi- 
nois delegation what instruction, if any, was given that delegation by the 
State Convention. 

Mr. Richardson, of Illinois. — The Convention of Illinois instructed her 
delegates to vote as a unit. They instructed them to vote for Mr. Pendleton. 
A majority of the delegation, not in accordance with my wish, but over- 
throwing that wish of mine, chose to go for another distinguished gentleman. 
I thought it my duty, sir, I still think it was my duty, to cast her whole vote 
for that other gentleman. (Applause.) I have disregarded — 

Mr. Maloxy. — Mr. President — 

The President. — I beg the gentleman from Illinois to take his seat and 
allow the Convention to proceed to another vote, and then, if he lias any ob- 
jection to make, it will come up in its order. 

Mr. Abbott, of Massachusetts. — I move that this Convention do now ad- 
journ. 

A vote was taken on the motion to adjourn, and it was carried. 

The President then announced, at five minutes past four o'clock, 
that the Convention stood adjourned until ten o'clock on Thursday 
morning. 



140 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF TRS 

FIFTH DAY. 

July 9, 1868. 

The Convention met pursuant to adjournment, Hon. Thomas L. 

Price, of Missouri, in the chair. 

The following prayer was offered by Rev. D. Plummer, of South 

Carolina, — 

Prayer. 

Holy, Holy, Holy, Lord God of Hosts ! Creation abounds in the monuments 
and memorials of Thy being, wisdom, power, glory, justice, goodness, and 
truth. Thy nature is Infinite, eternal, and unchangeable. Thou hast supreme 
claims to our love and homage — our submission and thanksgiving. Thou 
hast done great things for us, whereof we would make adoring mention. 
Thou madest man a little lower than the angels; and when he had sinned 
Thou didst provide a Redeemer. Thou hast also greatly favored our country. 
In days gone by Thou didst bring a vine out of a distant land. Thou didst 
cast out the heathen. Thou preparedst room before it, and didst cause it to 
take deep root, and it filled the land. The hills were covered with the shadow 
of it, and the boughs thereof were like the goodly cedars. She sent out her 
boughs into the sea and her branches into the river. Why, then, hast Thou 
broken down her hedges, so that all they who pass by the way do pluck her? 
The boar out of the wood doth waste it, and the wild beast oi' the field doth 
devour it. Return, we beseech Thee, O God of Hosts; look down from 
Heaven and visit this vine. Thou hast for some time sorely afflicted us. The 
grievousness of war was long upon us; countless myriads of our people, as 
loving and magnanimous as those who survive them, permaturely sleep the 
long sleep of death, if we went into the held, behold the slain! If we went 
into the city, behold Rachael weeping for her children, and refusing to be 
comforted because they were not. Our great men have conceived chaff and 
brought forth stubble. Our laud is full of widows and orphans. Even stout 
hearts among us have often been ready to fail for looking after those things 
which were thought to be coming upon us. We have hoped for succor, and 
behold sadness ; for salvation, and behold perplexity. Thou that dwellest be- 
tween the cherubim, Shinest forth before all our tribes, stir up Thy strength 
and come and save us. Feed us no longer with the bread of tears. Let the 
love and fear of God rule all hearts. Let us cease from man, whose breath 
is in his nostrils. Let us no more pervert our blessings to the nourishing of 
our personal or national vanity, nor to malevolence, worldliness, or ungodli- 
ness. Compass our land with Thy power, as with a shield. Let not our 
bruise be incurable, nor our wound immedicable. Let our children be as 
aforetime, and our people be established before Thee. Be not Thou as a man 
as to need, as a mighty man that cannot save. Implant and nourish in all our 
people a genuine love of country. Purely purge away our dross, and take 
away our sin. Thou only canst heal our breaches, or make us dwell in safety. 
Let not lots again be cast for our honorable men, nor our great men be bound 
with chains. Feed our hungry, clothe our naked ; make the widow's heart to 
sing for joy; in Thee let the fatherless find mercy; pity all who are tossed 
with tempest and not comforted; let not the rod of the wicked rest upon the 
lot of the righteous. Thou, blessed and only Potentate, canst make men to 
be of one mind and of the same judgment. O Thou, which has showed us great 
and sore troubles, wilt Thou not quicken us again, and bring us up again from 
these low depths? Do Thou, the glorious Lord, be unto us a place of broad 
rivers and streams, wherein shall go no galley with oars, neither shall gallant 
ship pass thereby. Let the future history of our government be as a morning 
without clouds. Let our sun no more go down, nor our moon refuse to give 
her light. Let North and South, East and West, heuceforth see eye to eye, 
feel heart to heart, and join inseparable bonds in love and peace, with joy and 
singing. And to the King eternal, immortal, invisible, the only wise God, our 
Saviour, be honor and glory, dominion and power, salvation and blessing, 
through Jesus Christ, forever and ever. Amen aud Amen. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 141 

The President pro tern. — The first business in order is the reading of the 
proceedings of yesterday. 

Mr. Black, of Indiana. — I move that the reading of the journal be dis- 
pensed with. 

The President pro tern. — It will be so ordered unless objection is made. 

It was so ordered. 

Mr. Slade, of Missouri. — I rise to a privileged question. This Convention 
has adopted a resolution inviting the delegates to the Soldiers and Sailors' 
Convention to seats upon this floor. Numerous complaints, however, have 
been made in my hearing, and some of them personally to myself, that that 
rule is disregarded, and some of the delegates are refused admission. 

The President pro tern. — The Secretary will state the proceedings in re- 
gard to the delegates to the Soldiers and Sailors' Convention. 

The Secretary. — In conformity with the resolution of the Convention in- 
viting the delegates to the Soldiers and Sailors' Convention to seats upon 
this floor, tickets have been issued by the National Executive Committee to 
their officers and sent to their hall for distribution. This hall is limited in 
capacity, and the Committee have endeavored to extend the courtesy just as 
far as the seats will permit. 

Mr. Slade. — I learn that delegates have presented their tickets and have 
been refused admission. 

The President pro tern. — Those were the tickets that were issued for a 
previous clay. The tickets were chauged yesterday, and new tickets were 
sent to the officers of that Convention. 

Mr. Slade. — I move that the explanation be entered upon the record. 

The President pro tern. — It will be so ordered unless there is objection. 

It was so ordered. 

Missouri nominates F. P. Blair. 

Mr. Brodhead, of Missouri. — We have reached the fifth day of our session 
without any successful result. I now ask leave to present to the Convention 
another name for their consideration. I will nominate Gen. Francis P. 
Blair, of Missouri. It is not necessary, in this Convention, that I should 
attempt to repeat his honorable services as a soldier or a statesman, for they 
are known to the whole country. Without desiring to disparage the qualifi- 
cations of any other of the distinguished gentlemen whose names are pre- 
sented for the consideration of this Convention, I will only say that Gen. 
Blair is eminently possessed of those qualities most needed at this time, — 
firmness of purpose, moral courage, and indomitable will. He will not be 
readily turned from a purpose once deliberately formed, although another 
co-ordinate department of the government may place itself in the way of its 
performance ; and, as President of the United States, he would preserve, pro- 
tect, and defend the Constitution ; and he would give to it a living meaning 
which, in the absence of any judicial interpretation to the contrary, gives to 
the President the right and imposes upon him the duty of refusing to execute 
unconstitutional laws. (Applause.) If we would meet the demands of this 
crisis, if we would not shirk from the issues of this hour, we must, by some 
tangible form of action, maintain the independence of the Executive. Congres- 
sional despotism is the great evil against which we have to contend. It is 
the fruitful source of all our troubles. It is that which is riving asunder the 



142 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

framework of our government, and substituting the views of faction for the 
requirements of the Constitution. We want a man at the head of the gov- 
ernment who knows the duties of the executive station, and knowing, dares 
maintain them. Such a man is the gentleman whose name I now present to 
the consideration of this Convention. 

The President, pro tern. — Mr. Brodhead, of the Missouri delegation, in 
behalf of that delegation, puts in nomination for President Francis P. Blair, 
Jr., of Missouri. 

Mr. Miller, of Pennsylvania. — I rise, sir, to a privileged question. I 
notice, sir, by the report of the proceedings of this Convention yesterday, 
that it is rather made a matter of congratulation by a portion of the press, 
that by the superior shrewdness or " sharpness " (for I believe that is the 
word used) of certain politicians, the rules of this Convention can be utterly 
ignored. Now, sir, I allude to the announcement of the change in the vote 
of the delegation from New York, and I insist upon it, sir, that upon a dele- 
gation voting for its candidate, or in changing its vote, even if its vote is 
changed from Andrew Johnson or Salmon P. Chase (applause), it shall 
content itself with simply voting. In order that the Chairman give the lie to 
the intimations that shrewdness and sharpness, emanating from where it 
may, can override the prevailing order of this Convention — 

Cries of " Order ! " 

The President. — Will the gentleman submit his motion? 

Mr. Miller. — I make no motion; I simply rise to a privileged question to 
call attention to the fact that it is alleged that the orders of this Convention 
cannot be enforced because some people are smart enough to avoid them. 

Cries of " Order ! " 

The President. — The first business in order will be the calling of the roll 
for the nineteenth ballot. 

California nominates Judge Field. 

Mr. Eose, of California. — Mr. President, I rise for the purpose of placing 
before the Convention the name of an eminent gentleman and statesman, — 
a gentleman of accomplished education ; of brilliant talents ; one who has 
distinguished himself in the service of his State aud the nation; a gentleman 
who has occupied the highest position of the judiciary of California; who 
from that position was transferred to the Supreme Court of the United States. 
Occupying that position, it was his province to stand up like a wall of lire 
against the encroachments of Radical domination, and stand as the guardian 
of the Constitution of his country against all the power of the Radical party 
at Washington ; to vindicate the charter of our liberties at a time when it 
required some one of ability to raise his voice and his pen against Radical 
misrule. I allude, sir, to Stephen J. Field, of the Supreme Court. (Great 
applause.) 

A Delegate. — Mr. Chairman, — 

The President. — The Clerk will announce the nomination. 

Secretary. — Mr. Rose, of California, places in nomination for President, 
Stephen J. Field, of California. (Cheers.) 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 143 

Withdrawal of George H. Pendleton. 

Mr. Vallandigham, of Ohio. — I have a communication in writing to make 
to this Convention. By permission of the Chair, I will read it from the stand. 

Applause, during which Mr. Vallandigham made his way to the 
rostrum. 

The President. — Mr. Vallandigham, of Ohio, will make a communica- 
tion to the Convention. 

Mr. Vallandigham. — The following is the communication to which I 
refer, — 

Cincinnati, July 2, 18G8. 
Washington McLean, Fifth Avenue Hotel, New York: 

My deak Sir, — You know better than any one the feelings and principles 
which have guided my conduct since the suggestion of my name for the 
Presidential nomination. 

You know that while I covet the good opinion of my countrymen, and would 
feel an honest pride in so distinguished a mark of their confidence, I do not 
desire it at the expense of one single electoral vote (Great applause), or of 
the least disturbance of the harmony of our party. I consider the success 
of the Democratic party in the next election of far greater importance than 
the gi'atification of any personal ambition, however pure and lofty it might 
be. (Loud cheei's.) 

If, therefore, at any time, a name shall be suggested, which, in the opinion 
of yourself and those friends who have shared our confidence, shall be strong- 
er before the country, or which can more thoroughly unite our own party. I 
beg that you will instantly withdraw my name, and pledge to the Convention 
my hearty and zealous and active support for its nominee. 

Very truly yours, 

George H. Pendleton. 

Great cheering. 

Mr. Vallandigham. — At the request of the gentleman to whom this letter 
is addressed, I submit it to this Convention. It was his desire that it should 
have been done very early in the afternoon of yesterday, but the earnest zeal 
and fidelity of the Ohio delegation, for the distinguished son of Ohio whom 
they had presented to the Convention for the office of President, precluded 
their consent to any such proposition. This morning his request has been 
renewed, and in conformity with it I have produced and read the letter, and 
submit that its spirit of magnanimity, unselfishness, and patriotic devotion 
to the interests of the country speak in terms of far higher eulogy in behalf 
of this distinguished gentleman than any words I could utter. (Great ap- 
plause.) Pursuant, therefore, to the authority of Mr. McLean, and acting 
under the advice of Mr. Pendleton, I withdraw his name, with hearty thanks 
to the multitude of earnest, zealous and devoted friends who have adhered 
to him with so great fidelity. 

Applause long and continued, and cheers for Pendleton. 

The President. — Mr. Vallandigham, by the instructions of the Ohio 
delegation, withdraws the name of George H. Pendleton as a candidate for 
the Presidency, before this Convention, and he does so by the direction of 
Mr. Pendleton himself. (Cheers.) 

We will now proceed with the nineteenth ballot. 



144 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

Nineteenth Ballot. 

The Secretary called the roll, with the following result, — 

Alabama. — Eight for Gen. Hancock. (Applause.) 

Arkansas. — Five for Gen. Hancock. 

California. — Three for Judge Field, one and a half for Hendricks, and 
one-half for Salraou P. Chase. 

Connecticut. — Six for Mr. English. 

Delaware. — The Chairman of the Delegation. — As the favorite candidate 
of the State of Delaware has been withdrawn, Delaware casts her votes for 
Gen. Hancock. (Applause.) 

Florida. — Three for Hendricks. 

Georgia. — Nine for Hancock. 

Illinois. — Sixteen for Hendricks. 

Mr. Maloxy, of Illinois — Mr. Chairman — 

Cries of " Order ! " 

The Pr.EsiDF.xT. ---The gentleman must come to order. 

Mr. Maloxy. — Mr. Chairman, I rise to a privileged question. 

Mr. Dawson of Pennsylvania. — Mr. Chairman, there can be no privileged 
question while the roll is being called, I insist, therefore, upon the enforce- 
ment of the rule. This is no place for mere exhibitions. 

The PRESIDENT. — The opinion of the gentleman from Pennsylvania coin- 
cides with the opinion of the Chair; and the Chair must consider the gentle- 
man from Illinois (Mr. Malony) out of order. 

A delegate moved that Mr. Malony have permission to make an 
explanation. 

Cries of " No ! No ! " 

The Pp.esidext. — The gentleman from Illinois cannot proceed without 
suspending the l'ule of this Convention. I therefore hope he will take his 
seat and let us proceed with the balloting. The Clerk will proceed. 

Indiana. — Thirteen for Hendricks. 

Iowa — requests to be passed by for the present. 

Kansas. — Two for Hendricks, and one for Hancock. 

Kentucky — asks time. 

Louisiana. — Seven for Hancock. 

Maine. — Four and a half for Hancock, two and a half for Hendricks. (Ap- 
plause.) 

Maryland. — Three for Blair, three for Hancock, one for Hendricks. 

Massachusetts. — Twelve for Gen. Winfield Scott Hancock. (Applause.) 

Michigan. — Eight for Thomas A. Hendricks. 

Minnesota. — Two aud a half for Hendricks, one for Haucock and one-half 
for Thomas H. Seymour, of Connecticut. (Applause ; three cheers proposed 
for Thomas H. Seymour, but were not given.) 

Mississippi. — Seven for Hancock. 

Missouri. — Ten aud a half for Blair, one-half for Hancock. 

Nebraska. — Three for Hendricks. 

Nevada. — Three for Judge Field. 

New Hampshire. — One-half for Thomas A. Hendricks, and four and a half 
for Gen. Hancock. (Applause.) 

New Jersey. — Seven forjudge Field, of California. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 145 

New York. — Thirty- three for Thomas A. Hendricks. (Great applause.) 

North Caroline. — Nine for Gen. Hancock. (Applause.) 

Ohio. — Twenty-one for Judge Packer, of Pennsylvania. 

Oregon. — Two for Field and one for Packer. 

Pennsylvania. — Mr. Woodward: Mr. President, I beg that the vote of 
Pennsylvania may be passed for the present, and that her delegation have 
leave to retire. 

Leave was granted. 

Iihode Island. — Four for James R. Doolittle. 

South Carolina. — Six for Gen. Hancock. (Applause.) 

Tennessee. — Ten for Hancock. (Applause.) 

Texas. — Six for Hancock. 

Vermont. — Five for Thomas A. Hendricks. 

Virginia. — Ten for Hancock. (Applause.) 

West Virginia. — Five for Hendricks. 

Wisconsin. — Eight for Doolittle. 

loica. — Eight for Thomas A. Hendricks, of Indiana. (Applause.) 

Kentucky. — Three and a half votes for Hendricks, three votes for Gen. 
Hancock, three and a half votes for Thomas H. Seymour, of Connecticut, one 
vote not voting. 

Pennsylvania. — Mr. "Woodward : Pennsylvania casts twenty-six votes for 
Gen. Hancock. (Loud Applause.) 
10 



146 



OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 



The Secretary announced the result of the vote, as follows, - 

The whole number of votes cast 316 

W. S. Hancock 135£ 

James R. Doolittle 12 

Thomas A. Hendricks 107£ 

James E. English 6 

Frank P. Blair 134 

S. T. Field 15 

S. P. Chase 4 

Asa Packer 22 

T. H. Seymour 4 



NINETEENTH BALLOT — RECAPITULATION. 



STATES. 



Alabama , 

Arkansas 

California 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

Florida 

Georgia. 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky* 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts .. 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

Now .Icrsey 

New York 

North Carolina . 

Ohio 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania ... 
Miode island . .. 
South Carolina . 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Vermont 

Virginia 

West Virginia .. 
Wisconsin 

Total 



33 



317 135^ 12 107^ 5 13£ 15 



* 1 not voting. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 147 

Twentieth Ballot. 

The Secretaiy then proceeded with the call of the Stales for the 
twentieth ballot, as follows, — 

Alabama. — Eight votes for Hancock. 

Arkansas. — One vote for Hancock, four for Hendricks, 

California. —Three votes for Field, one and a half for Hendricks, and one- 
half for Hancock. 

Connecticut. — Six votes for English. 

Delaware. — Three votes for Hancock. 

Florida. — Three votes for Hendricks. 

Georgia. — Nine votes for Hancock. 

Illinois. — Sixteen votes for Hendricks. 

Indiana. — Thirteen votes for Hendricks. 

Iowa. — Eight votes for Hendricks. 

Kansas. — Two votes for Hancock, one for Hendricks. 

Louisiana. — Seven votes for Hancock. 

Maine. — Four and a half votes for Hancock, and two and a half for 
Hendricks. 

Maryland. — Three votes for Blair, three for Hancock, and one for 
Hendricks. 

Michigan. — Eight votes for Hendricks. 

Minnesota. — Three and a half votes for Hendricks, one-half for Hancock. 

Mississippi. — Seven votes for Hancock. 

Missouri. — Three votes for Hendricks. 

Nevada. — Three votes for Field. 

New Hampshire. — One-half vote for Hendricks, four and a half for Hancock. 

New Jersey. — Seven votes for Hendricks. 

New York. — Thirty-three votes for Hendricks. (Cheers.) 

North Carolina. — Nine votes for Hancock. 

Ohio. — Passed at the request of the Chair. 

Oregon. — Three votes for Field. 

Pennsylvania. — Twenty-six votes for Hancock. (Cheers.) 

Bhode Island. — Four votes for Doolittle. 

South Carolina. — Six votes for General Hancock. 

Tennessee. — Ten votes for Hancock. 

Texas. — Six votes for Hancock. 

Vermont. — Five votes for Hendricks. 

Virginia. — Ten votes for Hancock. 

West Virginia. — Five votes for Hendricks. 

Missouri. — Eight votes for Doolittle. 

Kentucky. — Three and a half votes for Thomas H. Seymour, one-half not 
voting. 

Massachusetts. — The Chairman of the Delegation : The State of Massa- 
chusetts asks leave to retire for fifteen minutes for consultation. It is the 
first time we have made the request. I believe we have always been ready 
to vote when called upon. 

The President. — There being no objection, the request is granted. 



148 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

Ohio. — Ten votes for James E. English, eleven for General Hancock. 
(Applause.) 

The Secretary. — The call will be suspended fifteen minutes, waiting for 
the Massachusetts delegation. 

General McCook. — I ask the same leave for Ohio. 

The President. — Leave is granted. I would suggest that, inasmuch as 
two large delegations have retired for fifteen minutes, we take a recess for 
fifteen minutes. 

A recess for fifteen minutes was accordingly taken by the 
Convention. 

On the return from recess, and when order was restored, the Secre- 
tary proceeded with the call. 

Massachusetts. — Eleven votes for General Hancock, one voter declining to 
vote. (Applause.) 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 



149 



The Secretary announced the result, as follows, — 

Total number of votes cast 315£ 

W. S. Hancock 142£ 

James E. Euglish 16 

James K. Doolittle 12 

Thomas A. Hendricks 121 

Frank P. Blair 13 

S. T. Field 9 

T. H. Seymour 2 

John T. Hoffman — 



TWENTIETH BALLOT — RECAPITULATION. 





STATES. 


1 

6 

o 


© 

3 




63 

o 


pa 
o 

N 
ft! 

63 




c5 


to 

63 
> 

hi 


hq 




8 
5 
5 
6 
3 
3 
9 

16 

13 
8 
3 

11 
7 
7 
7 

12 
8 
4 

11 
3 
3 
5 
7 

33 


8 
1 
i 
i 

3 
*9 

i 
3| 

7 

4.1 
3 
11 

i 

k 

9 

11 

26 

6 
10 
6 

io 

142i 


6 

'i6 
16 


*4 
12 


4 

u 

3 

16 

13 

8 
2 

5 

k\ 
1 

*8 

•'■'• 

*3 

is 

7 
33 

'5 
'5 

121 


3 

io 

13 


"3 

'3 
'3 

9 


2 

2 


























































































9 

21 
3 

26 
4 
6 

10 
6 
5 

10 
5 
8 

317 












































Total 








* | not voting. \ 


1 no 


t VO 


ting. 















150 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

Twenty-first Ballot. 

The Secretary. — The Conveution will now proceed to take the twenty- 
first ballot. 

Alabama. — Eight votes for General Hancock. (Applause.) 

Arkansas. — Five votes for Thomas A. Hendricks. (Applause.) 

California. — Three votes for Field, one for Hendricks, and one for English. 

Connecticut. — Six votes for English. 

Delaware. — Three vojes for General Hancock. (Applause.) 

Florida. — Three votes for Thomas A. Hendricks. (Applause.) 

Georgia. — Nine votes for Hancock. (Applause.) 

Illinois. — Sixteen votes for Hendricks. (Applause.) 

Indiana. — Thirteen votes for Hendricks. (Applause.) 

Iowa. — Eight votes for Hendricks. (Applause.) 

Kansas. — Two votes for Hendricks, and one for General Hancock. 

Kentucky. — The Chairman of the Delegation : Pass Kentucky ; we are 
not ready. 

Louisiana. — Seven votes for Hancock. (Applause.) 

Maine. — Four aud a half votes for Hancock, aud two and a half for Hen- 
dricks. 

Maryland. — Six votes for Hancock, and one for Hendricks. (Applause.) 

Massachusetts. — The Chairman of the Delegation : Massachusetts is not ready. 

Michigan. — Eight votes for Thomas A. Hendricks. 

Minnesota. — Three and a half votes for Hendricks, and one and a half for 
Hancock. 

Mississip}ii. — Seven votes for Hancock. (Applause.) 

Missouri. — Four for Hendricks, six for Hancock, and one for English 
(Applause.) 

Nebraska. — Three votes for Hendricks. 

Nevada. — The Chairman of the Delegation: Pass Nevada. 

New Hampshire. — One-half vote for Hendricks, four and a half for Hancock. 

New Jersey. — Seven votes for Hendricks. 

New York. — Thirty-three votes for Hendricks. 

North Carolina. — Eight votes for Hancock, one for Hendricks. 

Ohio. — Eleven votes for Hancock, ten for James E. English. 

Oregon. — Two votes for Field, oue for English. 

Pennsylvania. — Twenty-six votes for Hancock. 

Ithode Island. — Four votes for James R. Doolittle. 

South Carolina. — Six votes for Haucock. 

Tennessee. — Five votes for Johnson, two and a half for Hancock, one-half 
for Hendricks, one-half for McClellau, two and a half not voting. 

Texas. — Six votes for Hancock. 

Vermont. — Five votes for Hendricks. 

Virginia. — Ten votes for Hancock. 

West Virginia. — Five votes for Hendricks. 

Wisconsin. — Eight votes for Doolittle. 

Kentucky. — Three and a half votes for Hancock, seven for Hendricks, and 
one-half for Hoffman, of New York. 

dlassachusetts. — Two votes for Heudricks, four for Salmon P. Chase, of 
Ohio (loud applause, followed by a few hisses) ; and six for Hancock. 

Nevada. — Three votes for Field. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 



151 



The Secretary announced the result of the vote, as follows, — 

The whole number of votes cast 31G£ 

W. S. Hancock 1354 

James R. Doolittle 12 

Thomas A. Hendricks 132 

James E. English 19 

Andrew Johnson 5 

S. J. Field 8 

S. P. Chase 4 

George B. McClellan '. .... 4 

John T. Hoffman £ 



TWENTY-FIRST BALLOT — RECAPITULATION. 



STATES. 



Alabama 

Arkansas 

California 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

Florida 

Georgia 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Blaine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts . . 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New York 

North Carolina . 

Ohio 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania ... 
Rhode" island . .. 
South Carolina. 

Tenuessee* 

Texas 

Vermont 

Virginia 

West Virginia .. 
Wisconsin 

Total 



24 



317 135J 12 132 19 5 



* 5 not voting. 



152 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

Mr. Hunter, of Missouri. — I desire to offer a resolution in reference to 
an adjournment to St. Louis, in September next. I will send it to the desk 
to be read. I rather think sometimes that I have not got into a Democratic 
Convention. I therefore present the resolution, in order that it may be read. 

The President. — The resolution is not now in order. The Clerk will pro- 
ceed to call the roll. 

Twenty-Second Ballot, 

Alabama. — Eight votes for Hancock. 

Arkansas. — Five votes for Hendricks. 

California. —Five votes for Hendricks. (Applause.) 

Connecticut. — Six votes for English. 

Delaware. — Three votes for Hancock. 

Florida. — Three votes for Hendricks. , 

Georgia. — Nine votes for Hancock. (Applause.) 

Illinois. — Sixteen votes for Hendricks. (Applause.) 

Indiana. — Thirteen votes for Hendricks. 

Iowa. — Eight votes for Hendricks. 

Kansas. — Two votes for Hendricks, one for Hancock. 

Kentucky. — The Chairman of the Delegation : Pass Kentucky. 

Louisiana. — Seven votes for Hancock. 

Maine. — Four and a half votes for Hancock, two and a half for Hendricks. 

Maryland. — Six votes for Hancock, one for Hendricks. 

Massachusetts. — The Chairman of the Delegation : Pass Massachusetts. 

Michigan. — Eight votes for Hendricks. 

Minnesota. — Four votes for Hendricks. 

Mississippi. — Seven votes for Hancock. 

Missouri. — Two votes for Hancock, eight for Hendricks, and one for 
English. 

Nebraska. — Three votes for Hendricks. 

Nevada. — Three votes for Hendricks. 

New Hampshire. — One-half vote for Hendricks, four and a half for Han- 
cock. 

New Jersey. — Seven votes for Hendricks. 

New York. — Thirty-three votes for Hendricks. (Cheers.) 

North Carolina. — Nine votes for Hendricks. 

Ohio was called. 

Ohio nominates Horatio Seymour. 

General McCook, of Ohio. — Mr. Chairman, I arise at the unanimous re- 
quest and demand of the delegation from Ohio, and with the consent and ap- 
proval of every public man in the State, including the Hon. George H. Pen- 
dleton, to again place in nomination, against his inclination, but no longer 
against his honor, the name of Horatio Seymour, of New York. (Rousing 
cheers and long-continued applause.) Let us vote, Mr. Chairman and gentle- 
men of the Convention, for a man whom the Presidency has sought, but who 
has not sought the Presidency. (Applause.) I believe in my heart that it is 
the solution of the problem which has been engaging the minds of the Dem- 
ocrats and conservative men of this nation for the last six months. (" Good ! 
good ! ") I believe it is the solution which will drive from power the Vandals 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 153 

who now possess the Capitol of the nation. (Applause.) I believe it will 
receive the unanimous assent and approval of the great belt of States, from 
the Atlantic — New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Oliio, Indiana, Michi- 
gan, Illinois, and Missouri, and away west to the Pacific Ocean. (Applause.) 
I say that he has not sought the Presidency, and I ask that this Convention 
shall demand of him that, sinking his own inclination and his own well-known 
desires, he shall yield to what we believe to be the almost unanimous wish 
and desire of the delegates to this Convention. (Great applause, and three 
cheers.) Iu my earnestness and enthusiasm, I had almost forgotten to cast 
the twenty-one votes of Ohio for Horatio Seymour. (Tremendous excite- 
ment, and nine cheers for Horatio Seymour.) 

The President (Hon. Horatio Seymour) here advanced to the front 
of the stage, and as soon as the enthusiasm would permit of his being 
heard, addressed the Convention. 

Speech of Governor Seymour. 

Gentlemen of the Convention, — (Cheers). The motion just made by the 
gentleman from Ohio excites in my mind the most mingled emotions. 
(Applause.) I have no terms in which to express my gratitude (Cheers) for 
the magnanimity of his State, and for the generosity of this Convention. 
(Cheers.) I have no terms in which to tell of my regret that my name has 
been brought before this Convention. God knows that my life and all that I 
value most in life I would give for the good of my country, which I believe 
to be identified with that of the Democratic party. (Applause, and cries of 
" Take the nomination then." ) I do not stand here as a man proud of his 
opinions, or obstinate in his purposes ; but upon a question of duty and of 
honor I must stand upon my own convictions against the world. (Applause, 
and a voice, " God bless you, Horatio Seymour.") Gentlemen, when I said 
here at an early day, that honor forbade my accepting a nomination by this 
Convention, I meant it. When, in the course of my intercourse with those 
of my own delegation and my friends, I said to them that I could not be a 
candidate, I meant it. And now permit me here to say that I know, after all 
that has taken place, I could not receive the nomination without placing, not 
only myself, but the great Democratic party, in a false position. But, gentle- 
men of the Convention, more than that, we have had to-day an exhibition, 
from the distinguished citizen of Ohio, that has touched my heart, as it has 
touched yours. (Cheers.) I thank God and I congratulate this country, 
that there is in the great State of Ohio, whose magnificent position gives it 
so great a control over the action of our country, a young man, rising fast 
into fame, whose future is all glorious, who has told the world that he could 
tread beneath his feet every other consideration than that of duty ; and when 
he expressed to his delegation, and expressed in more direct terms, that he 
was willing that I should be nominated, who had stood in such a position of 
marked opposition to his own nomination, I should feel a dishonored man if 
I could not tread, in the far distance, and in a feeble way, the same honorable 
pathway which he has marked out. (Great applause.) Gentlemen, I thank 
you, and may God bless you for your kindness to me ; but your candidate I 
cannot be. (Three cheers for Horatio Seymour.) 



154 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

Hon. Thoma9 L. Price, of Missouri, here assumed the chair. 

Mr. Vallandigham, of Ohio. —Mr. President: In times of great public 
exigency, and especially iu times of great public calamity, every personal 
consideration must be yielded to the public good. (Applause.) The safety 
of the people is the supreme law, and the safety of the American Republic 
demands the nomination of Horatio Seymour, of New York. (Cheers.) 
Ohio cannot — Ohio will not accept his declination, and her twenty-one votes 
shall stand recorded iu his name. (Cries of '• Good, good! " and cheers.) 
And now I call upon the delegations from all the States represented on this 
floor; upon the delegations from all the States of this Union, from the 
Atlantic to the Pacific, from the great lakes to the gulf, disregarding those 
minor considerations which justly it may be, properly I know, tend to sway 
them in casting their ballots, to make this nomination unanimous; and, be- 
fore God, I believe that in November the judgineut of this Convention will 
be confirmed and ratified by the people of all the United States. (Applause.) 
Let the vote of Ohio stand recorded then — twenty-one votes for Horatio 
Seymour. (Immense and continued applause.) 

Mr. Kkrxan, of New York. — Mr. President: Belonging to the delegation 
from the State of New York, and coming from the district where the Presi- 
dent of this Convention lives, I cannot, as an individual delegate, refrain 
from asking the indulgence of this Convention in making one or two obser- 
vations. And in order that we may relieve everybody, in order that we may 
relieve our Chairman from every bit of sensitiveness on the question of honor, 
I desire to say, on behalf of the delegation from the State of New York, that 
they have had neither lot nor part in the motion, which in our hearts we yet 
rejoice to hear from the State of Ohio. (.Applause.) We heard but recently 
that some such movement was thought, by wise and good men, necessary for 
the safety of our country, but our hearts were coerced out of deference to 
the sensitiveness of the gentleman who presides over this Convention, and 
we told them we could have neither lot nor part in it, unless others over- 
came that which we had never beeu able to do. Now, sir, let me say another 
word; we have balloted two or three days; we have balloted, thank God, iu 
the best of temper and of spirits; we have resolved, and we required the 
judgment of two-thirds of the delegates of this Convention for our nominee, 
to the end that we might be sure, for the sake of our country, that we 
would have a majority of the electors next November. And, after striving 
hard, after striving long, and after consulting as well as we could id reference 
to the various names brought before us, we have not been able yet to con- 
vince the judgment of two-thirds of the Convention for the candidates we 
have supported. New York has steadily voted her judgment, with kind feel- 
ings to other candidates. We have pronounced as our second choice for a 
distinguished citizen of Indiana. But it seems to me that, after this long 
struggle, and in this crisis of our affairs, and in view of what is so important 
to every man, woman, and child in this Union, that we should succeed iu 
November, — it seems to me now, in reference to our distinguished Chairman, 
that his honor is entirely safe. No one can doubt that he has steadily and in 
good faith declined ; but, now that his honor is safe, his duty to his country, 
his duty to his fellow-citizens, to all that shall come after us, requires that he 
shall let the judgment of the delegates of this Convention prevail; if they 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 155 

should select him as the standard-bearer most certain, in their opinion, to 
win a triumph for the country next November. (Applause.) We leave it in 
the hands of others, as we are constrained to do; but I give it as my judg- 
ment, for the past, the present and the future, that if we should select him as 
the man upon whom we can all unite, New York will fall in and give a 
majority of a hundred thousand without a canvass. (Great cheers.) 

The roll of States continued to be called as follows, — . 

Ow/o/i.-The Chairman of the Delegation: Three votes for Hendricks. 

Pennsylvania. — The Chairman of the Delegation: Twenty-six votes for 
General Hancock. 

Rhode Island. — The Chairman of the Delegation : Khode Island casts her 
four votes for Doolittle. 

South Carolina. — The Chairman of the Delegation : Six votes for General 
Hancock. 

Tennessee. — The Chairman of the Delegation : Andrew Johnson, four 
votes, Hendricks one and a half, Hancock three and a half, Seymour one. 

Texas. — The Chairman of the Delegation : Six votes for Haucock. 

Vermont. — The Chairman of the Delegation : Five votes for Hendricks. 

Virginia. — The Chairman of the Delegation : Ten votes for Hancock. 

West Virginia. — The Chairman of the Delegation: Five votes for Hen- 
dricks. 

Wisconsin. — Mr. H. L. Palmer, of Wisconsin : The delegation from Wis- 
consin have steadily supported a distinguished citizen of that State for the 
position of President of the United States, but I am now instructed by 
the delegation of the State to change that vote; and in making this change 
I am instructed to second the State of Ohio (Applause), and to cast their 
eight votes for Horatio Seymour. (Tremendous cheering.) 

Kentxidoj. — The Chairman of the Delegation : Kentucky casts her eleven 
votes for Horatio Seymour. (Wild enthusiasm.) 

Massachusetts.— Mr. Abbott, of Massachusetts : The State of Massachusetts 
instructs me to cast her vote for one, whom Massachusetts, whom all the East, 
so far as I know, has regarded for years past as the leader of the Democracy, 
Horatio Seymour, of New York. (Cheering, and waving of hats and hand- 
kerchiefs.) 

North Carolina. — Mr. Wright, of North Carolina : I am instructed by the 
delegation from North Carolina to change their vote, and to cast it as they 
originally cast it, for Horatio Seymour, of New York. (Great cheering.) 

The Secretary then announced that the State of North Carolina 
cast her nine votes for Horatio Se3 r mour. 

A scene of the wildest enthusiasm followed, the chairmen of a 
dozen of the delegations present springing from their seats to obtain 
a recognition from the chairman pro tera. to change their votes to 
Seymour. 

Mr. Featherstone, of Miss. — I am instructed to change the vote of the 
State of Mississippi from General Hancock to Horatio Seymour. 

The announcement was received throughout the building with 
uproarious applause, and the rising of delegates to their feet, and 



156 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

calling for recognition by the Chair. The president pro tern, insisted 
upon gentlemen taking their seats. 

Mr. Woodward, of Pennsylvania, after repeated efforts, made 
himself heard by the Chair and those immediately surrounding him, 
that the State of Pennsylvania, having voted uniformly thus far for 
two of her distinguished sons, had instructed him, through her dele- 
gation, to transfer her entire twenty-six votes to Horatio Seymour. 

The Secretary, by virtue of the superior strength of his lungs, 
informed the Convention that the State of Pennsylvania had cast its 
unanimous vote for Horatio Seymour, of New York. 

The wildest enthusiasm continued. Nothing was heard but cheers 
from the galleries and floor, and cries of " Mr. President " from 
delegates standing in their seats. Fans, handkerchiefs, and hats 
were waved, and some took the small banners designating the seats 
of different delegations, and swayed them in the air. 

Seeing no probability of quieting the clamor, the Secretary suc- 
cessively recognized the chairmen of the delegations from Missouri 
and Virginia, and announced that the}- had changed their votes to 
Horatio Seymour. 

A scene of still greater excitement and tumultuous enthusiasm fol- 
lowed. All the delegations were standing in their places, and striv- 
ing for the recognition of the Chair by gesture and by voice, in the 
midst of which the announcement was made that Maryland, Illinois, 
Texas, and Delaware, had transferred their united votes to Horatio 
Seymour. 

The announcement of the vote of each State added, if possible, to 
the tumult. 

At this point the cannon outside the building commenced firing, 
and the discharges were answered by those inside the hall rising to 
their feet with vociferous cheers and the waving of handkerchiefs. 

Mr. Smith, of Vermont. — Mr. President, Vermont was the first State in 
this Convention to cast its vote for the distinguished citizen of Indiana (Mr. 
Hendricks). She now yields to the evident wish of the Convention, and she 
finds in the distinguished gentleman from New York all she desires as a 
candidate. She, therefore, changes her vote from Thomas A. Hendricks to 
Horatio Seymour. 

New Jersey, "West Virginia, Alabama, Tennessee, Arkansas, 
Maine, and Georgia, here changed their votes to Seymour, receiving 
the approval of all who heard the Secretary declare the change. 

The Chairman of the Kansas Delegation. — Kansas casts her three votes 
for Horatio Seymour. 

Mr. Bigler. — California casts her five votes for Horatio Seymour. (Ap- 
plause.; 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 157 

Mr. L.vwsox, of Pa. — I am requested to say that it is the unanimous voice 
of this Convention that the nomination of Horatio Seymour be made by 
acclamation. 

The President pro tern. — It cannot be done until all the States have voted 
on this ballot. 

The Chairman of the Florida Delegation. — Florida wishes to cast her 
three votes for Horatio Seymour. (Applause.) 

The Chairman of the Minnesota Delegation. — Minnesota, following the 
lead of Ohio, casts her entire vote for Horatio Seymour. 

The Chairman of the New Hampshire Delegation. —The State of New 
Hampshire changes her vote, and casts it entire for Horatio Seymour. 

The Chairman of the Georgia Delegation. — The State of Georgia has 
indicated her choice by casting her vote for the most accomplished soldier 
of the Union army, he who, when the war was ended, yielded to the suprem- 
acy of the Constitution of his country. But, sir, we come here to abide by 
the choice of the Democratic party, and now join our voice with that of the 
Democracy, from one end of the country to the other, for Horatio Seymour. 
(Applause.) 

Mr. Jones, of Louisiana. — Louisiana asks leave to change her vote, and 
vote for Horatio Seymour, and, Mr. Chairman, although we have twenty-five 
thousand of our white population disfranchised, and although we have fifty- 
thousand voters unknown to our Constitution and to our laws, yet, Mr. 
Chairman, I pledge the vote of the State of Louisiana to the nominee. 
(Applause.) 

Mr. Stuart, of Michigan. — Mr. Chairman, the delegates from the State of 
Michigan came to this Convention of all the States in the Union, with but 
one single purpose in view, and that was to nominate a candidate for the 
office of President of the United States who could certainly be elected. That 
position we occupy to-day. And, sir, when we look around in this Conven- 
tion, and see here, for the first time in eight years, the assembled wisdom of 
the Democracy of the country, — a country bounded only upon the Atlantic 
and upon the Pacific, because on the north and on the south America acknowl- 
edges as yet no boundary whatever, — when so much wisdom as is here 
to-day, with a voice so united as this, speaks for the distinguished son of 
New York, the greatest statesman, in my judgment, now living (Applause), 
— Michigan cannot consent to withhold her voice in this general expression, 
not only of confidence in him, but, sir, this expression of pati-iotic determi- 
nation to rescue this country from the grasp of the most desperate rebels 
that ever seized upon the reins of the government. (Voices, "Good! 
good! ") It is a question of Constitution; it is a question of country; it is 
a question of whether our blessed Union, and the freedom of these millions 
is to live, or whether it is to be buried deep down in everlasting oblivion and 
infamy. (A voice, " Good! ") Sir, under these circumstances, it is with in- 
finite pleasure that Michigan casts her vote for Horatio Seymour, of New 
York. (Great applause.) 

Mr. James B. Campbell, of South Carolina. — Mr. President, I rise to 
answer for that State of the Union which bears at this time most heavily the 
chains and weight of Radical misrule. I did not suppose, sir, that my voice, 
or that of any of my colleagues, would be heard in this assembly, except in 
the discharge of the routine business. In the words of the Convention that 



Lj)8 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

sent us here, we were instructed to behave with the proprieties which belong 
to the well-bred guest, and not to assume any of the functions of the sym- 
posiarch of the feast. We came here, Mr. President and gentlemen of the 
Convention, having no favorite candidate, — going not for men but for 
measures. We have been more than grateful for the declaration of principles 
and of prospective measures that has been announced by the Convention, not 
only with unanimity, but with unsurpassed enthusiasm. We were instructed, 
and the instructions were coincident with the feelings of every honest heart 
in South Carolina, to accept the nomination of that man who seemed to have 
the voice of the Convention. Obeying these instructions, South Carolina, 
with an invocation of God's blessing upon this party wherein is centred the 
last hopes of the Republic of Washington, nominates and votes for Horatio 
Seymour, of New York. (Great applause.) 

A delegate from California moved that Horatio Seymour be ten- 
dered the unanimous vote of the Convention. 

Voices. — " No ! no ! let the vote be finished." 

The Chairman of the Delaware Delegation. — Delaware would change her 
vote, if not too late, and casts all her votes for Horatio Seymour. (Applause 
and laughter.) 

Mr. Samuel J. Tildex. — Mr. Chairman — 

A Delegate from New York. — See if any other State wants to change its 
vote first. 

Mr. Tildex. — If there is any State which has not yet voted, or that wishes 
to change its vote, I will yield the floor for that purpose. 

Delegates. — "No! no!" "Goon!" 

Mr. Tildex. — It is fit that on this occasion New York should wait for the 
voice of all her sister States. Last evening I should not have believed, did 
not believe, the event which has just happened to be possible ; not because I 
had not seen here that the underlying choice of almost all of this Convention 
was that we should do what we now have done. There was but one obsta- 
cle, and that was in the repugnance, — which I take upon myself the whole 
responsibility of declaring to have been earnest, sincere, deep-felt, — on the 
part of Horatio Seymour to accept this nomination. I did not believe that 
any circumstance would make it possible, except that Ohio, with whom we 
have been unfortunately dividing our votes, should herself demand it, and to 
that I thought New York ought to yield. We were without any connection 
or any combination that bound our faith or our honor, and I was anxious that 
when we should leave this Convention there should be underlying our action 
no heart-burnings, no jealousy, no bitterness of disappointment ; and I be- 
lieve that in this result we have lifted this Convention far above every such 
consideration. And I believe further, after having surveyed the ground for 
a loug time and meditated most carefully what we ought to do, influenced, I 
am sure, by no personal partiality, by no other thing than the deliberate con- 
viction of my judgment, — I believe that we have made the nomination most 
calculated to give us success in the election which approaches. And, sir, 
having made these observations in behalf of the New York delegation, I now 
ask that our vote be changed, and be recorded for Horatio Seymour. 
(Cheers.) 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 159 

The Secretary. — The State of New York changes her vote, and casts her 
unanimous vote for Horatio Seymour. 

Loud and long-continued applause. 

Mr. White, of Maryland. — I now propose, Mr. President, that a commit- 
tee of one from each State be appointed to call upon, — 

Loud cries of " No, no ! " " Better wait until the vote is taken." 

The President, pro tern. — The vote has not yet been announced. 

Mr. White. — I understood that the chairman of the New York delegation 
asked if all the States had voted, and it was announced that they had, — that 
they had all voted for Horatio Seymour, and that he was unanimously 
nominated. 

The President, pro tern. — The vote has not been announced. 

Mr. White. — I withdraw my motion. 

Mr. S. Clark, of Wisconsin. — I have a proposition to make to this Con- 
vention if it is in order to announce it before the vote is announced. I see 
around me, on the floor and in the galleries, ladies and gentlemen who desire 
also to be heard, and who should have some voice in this Convention in 
ratifying the nomination by acclamation. I therefore move that they ratify 
it by giving three cheers for Horatio Seymour. 

The suggestion was immediately acted upon. Every one rose, and 
amid the waving of hats, handkerchiefs, fans, canes, and parasols, 
three tremendous cheers were given, which fairly made the building 
rock. 

The President, pro tern. — The Convention will come to order. 

The Secretary. — The following is the result of the twenty-second ballot : 
All the States having voted, and the vote of the full electoral college having 
been given, the roll stands for Horatio Seymour three hundred and seventeen 
votes. 

Renewed cheering, the Convention and audience again rising, and 
another scene of enthusiasm prevailing for five minutes. 

The President, pro tern. — The Convention will come to order. All busi- 
ness will be suspended until order is restored. 

Mr. Dawson, of Pennsylvania. — Mr. President, — 

The President, pro tern. — The official announcement has not yet been made. 
Gentlemen of the Convention will sit down. 

Order having been restored, the President pro tern, said, — 

The Hon. Horatio Seymour having received the unanimous vote of this 
Convention, I therefore declare him the candidate and the standard-bearer of 
the Democratic party in the ensuing election. 

The announcement was followed by tremendous cheering. 



160 



OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 



Table of Twenty-second Ballot on First Call. 

STATE OF THE BALLOT BEFORE THE STATES CHANGED THEIR VOTES 
FOR MR. SEYMOUR. 



STATES. 



Alabama 

Arkansas 

California 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

Florida 

Georgia 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky* 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts*. . 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire. 

New Jersey 

New York 

North Carolina . . 

Ohio 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina .. 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Vermont 

Virginia 

West Virginia... 
Wisconsin* 

Total 



10:;'. 



* Not voting. 



NATIOXAL DEMOCRATIC CONVEXTIOX. 



161 



Table of Twenty-Second Ballot amended before the vote ivas 

announced. 



II. Skymour. 

Alabama 8 

Arkansas 5 

California 5 

Connecticut 6 

Delaware 3 

Florida 3 

Georgia 9 

Illinois 16 

Indiana 13 

Iowa 8 

Kansas 3 

Kentucky 11 

Louisiana 7 

Maine 7 

Maryland 7 

Massachusetts 12 

Michigan 8 

Minnesota 4 

Mississippi 7 

Missouri , 11 



II. Seymour. 

Nebraska 3 

Nevada 3 

New Hampshire 5 

New Jersey 7 

New York 33 

North Carolina 9 

Ohio 21 

regon 3 

Pennsylvania 26 

Rhode Island 4 

South Carolina 6 

Tennessee 10 

Texas 6 

Vermont 5 

Virginia 10 

West Virginia 5 

Wisconsin 8 



Total 317 

Necessary to a choice 212 

Mr. Preston of Kentucky. — I believe there is no business before the Con- 
vention, and I ask if the nomination of Vice-President is now in order, or 
whether a resolution to that effect has been adopted. If not, I make the 
motion. 

Mr. Clymer. — I move that the Convention take a recess of one hour for 
consultation with regard to Vice-President. 

The President pro tern, stated the question on the motion of Mr. 
Preston. 

Mr. Woodward. — Is it in order now to nominate a candidate for Vice- 
President? 

The President pro tern. — Wait until this motion is decided by the Con- 
vention. 

The motion of Mr. Preston prevailed. 

Mr. Woodward. — Mr. President — 

The Secretary. — A resolution was adopted several days ago that in the 
nominations of President and Vice-President the States shall be first called 
in order for nominations. 

Mr. Woodward. — I rose for the purpose of making a nomination ; but I 
understand that the roll is to be called. 

The President pro tern. — The roll of the States will now be called ; any 
State desiring to nominate a candidate for Vice-President can rise through 
their Chairman, and make their nomination. 

The Secretary called the roll of States as follows, — 

Alabama.— The Chairman of the Delegation : Alabama makes no nomination. 

Arkansas. — The Chairman of the Delegation : Arkansas makes no nomi- 
nation. 

California. — Mr. Bigler : California has no nomination to presert. 

Mr. Boyer, of Pennsylvania. — I move that the Convention take a recess 
of half an hour for the purpose of consultation. 

A Delegate. — I move that the resolution of the gentleman from Pennsyl- 
vania lie on the table. 

11 



162 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

The President pro tern, put the question, and there were cries of 
"No, no!" 

The question was then taken on ordering a recess of five minutes, 
which was decided in the negative. 

A motion for recess of ten minutes did not prevail. 

A Delegate from California. — I desire to put in nomination Frank P. Blaie. 
(Loud cheers.) 

Mr. Bigler, of Pennsylvania. — Mr. Chairman, I desire to make a sug- 
gestion to the members of the Convention, and that is, that the nomination 
for Vice-President will be an important part of the coming election. I sug- 
gest the propriety and the necessity of a recess for at least half an hour, in 
order that we may confer upon the subject. 

Mr. Preston, of Kentucky. — "We are on a question of order, — the calling 
of the States, — and I submit here that no motion to adjourn or for a recess is in 
order. (Applause.) This will be interminable, if we should go on this way 
with motions to adjourn and to take a recess while taking a vote on an order. 

The President pw tern. — The proposition is to adjourn for half an hour. 

Mr. Preston, of Kentucky. — We are on an order for calling States. 

Judge Woodward. — I move that the order of the Convention be sus- 
pended for the purpose of receiving from the delegation from Pennsylvania a 
nomination for Vice-President. 

The Secretary. — The order of the Convention directing the Secretary to 
call the roll of States for nominations for Vice-President was in progress, 
and the Secretary was calling the roll of States alphabetically. 

Judge Woodward. — My motion was that the order be suspended. 

The President pro tern. — Mr. Woodward moves to suspend the rules by 
which the Convention ordered nominations to be made, and the Clerk was 
calling the roll of States. 

Mr. Preston, of Kentucky. — If you will withdraw it, there will be no diffi- 
culty. We will make the nomination unanimously, and then take a recess. 

Judge Woodward, of Pennsylvania. — I desire to make a nomination for 
Vice-President. The Pennsylvania delegates together — 

The President pro tern. — The question is upon suspending the rules as 
proposed by the gentleman from Pennsylvania. 

The question was put and declared lost. 

Mr. Stuart, of Michigan. — I move to take a recess for one hour. 

Mr. Miller, of Pennsylvania. — Pennsylvania is for General Blair. 

The President pro tern, put the question on the motion to take a 
recess for one hour, .and declared the motion carried. 

Hie Vice-Presidential Nomination. 

After recess, the Convention was called to order at 3.20 o'clock. 
The President pro tern., General Price. —The Clerk will proceed with the 
call of the States for the nominations for Vice-President. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 163 

The Secretary. — I will state to the Convention that several resolutions 
have been sent up here, and will remain upon the table to be taken up in their 
order. The call of the roll was interrupted at Connecticut. We will com- 
mence with Delaware. 

The States of Delaware, Florida, and Georgia made no nomination. 

Illinois. 

Mr. Sparks, of Illinois. — Mr. President: the State of Illinois cast, by the 
instruction of the State Convention that sent us here, the vote of that State 
for the greatest man of the West, George H. Pendleton. (Applause.) The 
State of Illinois through its delegation followed the lead of that distinguished 
statesman, and voted his particular choice, in voting for the greatest man in 
this broad Union, — Horatio Seymour. (Applause.) Having voted thus far, 
I am instructed by the delegation of that State now to present to this Conven- 
tion as a candidate for Vice-President, the name of oue of its own distin- 
guished citizens, mentioning whom I go back to times past, and mention the 
peer of Clay and Webster, and mention the name rendered distinguished as 
that of a Major-General in the late war, — a man who, if he did not get the 
credit for the capture of Vicksburg, possesses the brains that originated its 
capture. (Applause.) But, holding a subordinate position, the glory was 
given to a much inferior man. (Applause.) I mean General John A. Mc- 
Clernand, of Illinois. (Great applause.) 

The Secretary. — Illinois puts in nomination for Vice-President General 
John A. McClernand, of Illinois. (Renewed cheers.) 

General McClernand withdraws. 

General McClernand, on rising, was greeted with loud applause. 
He said, — 

Mr. President : the State of Illinois, through her delegation in this Con- 
vention, has done me the honor to present my name for the high office of 
Vice-President of the United States. This complimeut is far above any 
merit which I possess. I beg in return to offer my sincerest thanks, and in 
doing so I beg that the delegates of Illinois will withdraw my name from the 
consideration of the Convention. (Cries of "No! no!") I am here, Mr. 
President and gentlemen, seeking no office, but to contribute my humble ef- 
forts to liberate the country from the thraldom which now binds her and 
degrades her. (Applause.) I have given my efforts as a delegate to the Sol- 
diers and Sailors' Convention and in a very humble way in this Convention. 
As a Democrat and -as a citizen I approve the nomination for President which 
has been made to-day. (Applause.) I can say, on behalf of the numerous 
and distinguished body of soldiers and sailors assembled in this city a few 
days since, that the nomination will meet with their hearty response ; and the 
coming election will determine the fact that all the soldiers and sailors of 
this country are not for a sham hero — a mere fatuity— -a mere compromise 
between abler and better men; that they are not to have a plagiarism of 
other and better mens' deserts ; but that they are to have Horatio Seymour, 
of New York, an eminent statesman, an orator, and a gentleman, — a man 
every way qualified to administer the executive office of this country. They 
will prove, I say, in the approachiug election, that one-half, and more than 



164 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

one-half, of the patriotic soldiers and sailors arc for Horatio Seymour. 
(Applause.) And now a word to my friends, against whom I was so lately 
arrayed in battle. I say To them, by-gones are by-gones. (Cries of " Good ! " 
"good! " and cheers.) Let the dead bury the dead. I stretch to them the 
hand of fellowship and say to them, let us co-operate to arrest disunion and 
usurpation. We have a common interest in the country, we have a common 
stock in it, and unless we do it the government will be overthrown ; it is even 
now a despotism. I have said much more, Mr. President, than 1 intended 
to say when I arose. I am in earnest in what I have said, and I ask, I appeal 
to my delegation to withdraw my name as a candidate before this Conven- 
tion. (Cries of "No! no!") There are other gentlemen in this Convention 
whom I had rather support than have my name presented. 

Mr. Sparks, of Illinois. — It is believed, by me at least, that when a gentle- 
man declines a nomination, we ought to consult his wishes. At the request 
of General McClernand, whom Illinois would take great pleasure in support- 
ing, I now withdraw his name. 

Indiana made no nomination. 

Hon. Asa C. Dodge nominated. 

The Slate of Iowa being called, Mr, O'Neil said, — 
Mr. President : I am instructed by fifteen of the sixteen members of the Iowa 
delegation to put a name in nomination for the Vice-Presidency. Although he is 
nothere present in the Convention, I am instructed by my delegation to present 
the name of a gentleman of irreproachable and stainless private character, of in- 
corruptible integrity, of unswerving devotion to the principles of the Demo- 
cratic party : a man whose patriotism and fidelity have never been questioned; 
a man whose reputation is national. I wish to say to this Convention that 
he has represented the State of Iowa in four different Congresses ; that he has 
been for two terms the representative of that State in the Senate of the United 
States; that he has been for four years, under the administrations of Mr. Pierce 
and Buchanan, the American Minister to the Court of Spain. The Iowa 
delegation puts in nomination for the office of Vice-President, before the 
Convention, the name of the Hon. A. C. Dodge, of Iowa (Cheers.) 

Thomas Ewing, Jr., nominated. 

Kansas being called, Mr. Blair of Kansas said, — 

Mr. President : I hold iu my hand a letter addressed to me by the Executive 
Committee appointed by the Soldiers and Sailors' Convention recently assem- 
bled in this city, which I now forward to the Secretary, with a request that it be 
read for the information of the delegates, and that it be spread upon the min- 
utes of this Convention as a part of the proceedings thereof. Before it is read, 
Mr. President, I desire, on behalf of the people of Kansas, to present to the con- 
sideration of the Convention the name of one of her most honored citizens in 
connection with the second office in the gift of the American people. I desire to 
present to this Convention the name of a man who is celebrated as a judicial offi- 
cer, and distinguished as a statesman, and whose military career was the very 
impersonation of chivalric and knightly honor. I desire to present for the 
consideration of this Convention a name honored alike in the sire and in the 
son. I desire, sir, on behalf of Kansas, to present for the consideration of this 
Convention the name of General Thomas Ewing, Jr., of Kansas. (Cheers.) 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 165 

The Secretary then read the following letter, which was ordered 
to be placed on the minutes of the Convention, — 

New York, July 8, 18G8. 
Dear General, — At a meeting of the National Executive Committee, 
appointed by the Soldiers ami Sailors' Convention, held this morning, it 
was voted, unanimously, that their first choice for candidate of your Conven- 
tion for the Presidency is General Hancock. But in the event of failure to 
nominate him, and any gentleman not connected with the army should be 
selected from the East,, then our first choice for the second place on the 
ticket was General Ewing, of Kansas; and if from the West, then our choice 
would be General Franklin, of Connecticut. 

Very truly yours, etc., 

Eli C. Binoley, 
Member of the National Executive Committee, from 31assachusetts. 
General Charles W. Blair, Chairman Kansas Delegation. 

Kentucky nominates Frank P. Blair. 

Kentucky being called, ex-Confederate General Pkeston, of Ken- 
tucky, said, — 

Mr. President, I am instructed unanimously, by the State of Kentucky, by 
its delegates here assembled, to place in nomination a gentleman of great 
distinction in his State, and in the country. One in the prime of manhood; 
distinguished by his devotion to the Union, having served it both in a civil 
and in a military capacity with the utmost honor, and obtained a reputation 
in the army second to no man of his grade. Kentucky feels that this nomi- 
nation is due to the great West. No Southern State has presented any 
nomiuee for any place, as you will observe here ; but I feel that it is appro- 
priate — for we have eutertained different opiuions from him — to state that 
I am instructed now to nominate him in order to testify that we, the soldiers 
of the South, stretch forward our hands to the soldiers of the North 
(Applause), in the spirit of a noble amity that your resolutions have incul- 
cated. (Applause.) It is with that view, sir, after consultation with the 
Northern delegations, and one of the most powerful, that the duty is de- 
volved upon me of making this nomination. I now have the privilege, 
therefore, of nominating as a candidate for the Vice-President of the United 
States, General Fraxcis P. Blair, of Missouri. (Applause.) 

General James B. Steadjiax, of Louisiana. — Mr. President, I rise, sir, as 
one of the humble representatives of the United States Army in the late 
war, holding a seat in the Convention, to secoud, on behalf of Louisiana, the 
nomination of my comrade-in-arms, Major-General Frank P. Blair. (Ap- 
plause.) When this Convention adjourned, r went immediately to the head- 
quarters of the Soldiers and Sailors' Executive Committee, ou Union Square. 
I met there some ten or twelve gentlemen, who were distinguished in the 
armv, and consulted them in regard to their choice for a candidate for Vice- 
President of the United States; aud by a unanimous vote of all who were 
present, I was requested to say to this Convention, without disparagement 
to the name of any other soldier that has been presented here, or may be pre- 
sented, that General Frank P. Blair would be acceptable to the soldiers of the 
United States Army. (Applause.) The exhibitiou of magnanimity that has 
been made in this Convention by the soldiers of the Confederate Army, in 
coming up and giving a contradiction to the charge of the Radical party 



166 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

that they did not accept sincerely the situation in casting their votes as they 
did in this Convention, for that distinguished soldier of the United States 
Army, Major-General Winfleld Scott Hancock, is appropriately followed up, 
and they have given renewed assurances of their devotion to the Union, of 
their willingness to accept the issues of the war, by presenting to this Con- 
vention, through General Preston, — whom I met on the bloody field of Chiea- 
mauga, — the name of Major-General Francis P. Blair. (Loud applause.) 
I therefore feel authorized to say that if General Blair is nominated, his nom- 
ination will meet with a response from every brave and true man that fought 
on either side, who desires to see peace and prosperity restored to our com- 
mon country. (Applause.) 

Maine having been called, the chairman of the delegation said, — 
Mr. President, I do not rise to make any nomination, but simply to second 
the nomination so ably and eloquently made by the gentleman from Kansas, 
and to present to the Convention a recommendation signed by three of the 
Executive Committee of the Soldiers and Sailors' Convention, similar to the 
oue heretofore presented by the gentleman from Kansas. 

The following paper was read by the Secretary, — 

National Executive Committee of Soldiers and Sailors. ) 

New York, July 7. 1868. ) 

To the Chairmen of the New England Delegations to the Democratic National 
Convention novo in session: 
GENTLEMEN, — While we arc desirous thai General Hancock may receive 
the nomination of your Convention for President of the United States, yet 
deeming it possible that be may not be the choice of your Convention, we 
respectfully suggest, and urge that if you nominate a civilian from the West, 
the second place upon your ticket be awarded to General William 15. Frank- 
lin ; and that, if you nominate a civilian from the East, General Thomas 
Ewiug, Jr., may be selected by you for the second place. 

[Signed.] A. W. Bradbury, 

Eli C. Kinsley, 

I. M. DONAHOE, 

Chairmen of Delegations for Neva England to the Soldiers 
and Sailors' Convention. 
The Chairman of the Maryland Delegation. — Maryland makes no nomina- 
tion, but heartily concurs in the nomination made by the Slate of Kentucky. 
(Applause.) 

Massachusetts, Michigan, and Minnesota made no nomination. 

The CHAIRMAN of the Minnesota Delegation. — Mr. President, the State of 
Mississippi makes no nomination, but most cordially seconds the nomination 
of General Blair. 

The Chairman of the Missouri Delegation. — Missouri makes no nomina- 
tion, but seconds the nomination of General Blair. (Applause.) 

The Chairman of the Nebraska Delegation. — Nebraska makes no nomina- 
tion, but seconds the nomination of General Frank P. Blair. (Applause.) 

The Chairman of the Nevada Delegation. — Nevada makes no nomination, 
but seconds that of Frank P. Blair. 

New Hampshire and New Jersey made no nomination. 

Mr. Ttlden, of New York. —The delegation from New York desires to be 
passed for the present. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 167 

The Chairman of the North Carolina Delegation. — Mr. President : North 
Carolina makes no nomination for Vice-President, but in order to show the 
people of the United States that we have no prejudice against a gallant sol- 
dier, who fought for his section of the country, we desire to second the nom- 
ination of General Francis P. Blair. (Applause.) 

Ohio made no nomination. 

The Chairman of the Oregon Delegation. — Oregon makes no nomination, 
but seconds the nomination of General Francis P. Blair. 

Mr. Woodward. — Mr. President: The State of Pennsylvania makes no 
nomination, but I am instructed by the Delegation of Pennsylvania to second 
the nomination of that brave soldier and judicious statesman, General Frank 
P. Blair. (Applause.) 

Rhode Island made no nomination. 

Mr. Campbell, of South Carolina. — Mr. Chairman: The State of South 
Carolina answers her call, not by her Chairman, but by her best beloved son, 
a soldier, who knows better than I do how to interchange the courtesies 
which belong to enemies in war and friends in peace. I have the honor to 
introduce to this Convention, Mr. Wade Hampton. (Loud cheers.) 

Speech of Wade Hampton. 

Mr. Chairman, — The only reason I can give why my State has done me 
the honor to ask me to speak for her, on this occasion, is, I suppose, that I 
met the distinguished gentleman whose name has been presented by Ken- 
tucky on more thau one field. Our State wishes me to say to the soldiers, 
and in reply to the remarks of the distinguished soldier from Illinois, that 
the soldiers of the South cordially, heartily, and cheerfully, accept the right 
hand of friendship which is extended to them. (Cries of "Good!" and 
cheers.) "W e wish to show that we appreciate the kindness and cordiality 
that have been extended to us by all classes. We wish particularly to make 
an acknowledgment to the Federal soldiers who have met us in so friendly 
a manner. It is due to them, I think, that they should have the second 
place upon the ticket. It is due to that Convention which so cordially ap- 
proved your platform. It is clue to the South ; and I, for my State, most 
heartily second the nomination of General Blair. 

Upon the conclusion of his remarks, Mr. Hampton was congratu- 
lated, personalty, by General McClernand, and General McCook, 
amid the applause of the Convention and the spectators. 

The call of States was then proceeded with. 

The Chairman of the Tennessee Delegation. — Tennessee makes no nom- 
ination, but concurs in, and most cordially indorses, the nomination of Gen- 
eral Blair. (Cheers.) 

Texas and Vermont made no nomination. 

General Kemper, of Virginia. — As a son of the old Commonwealth of 
Virginia. I am instructed to strike hands with the soldiers of the Army of 
the North, and, in the name of Virginia, to accept and ratify, as a token 
of the perpetuity of this Union, the nomination of Major-General Francis P. 
Blair, of Missouri. (Applause.) 



168 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

West Virginia and Wisconsin made no nomination. 

Mr. Tilden, of New York. — The State of New York, following Ohio, and 
the other great States of the North-west, concurs in the nomination of Gen- 
eral Frank P. Blair. 

Cries of " Good ! " and cheers. 

The Name of JEwing withdrawn. 

Mr. Charles W. Blair, of Kansas. — Mr. Chairman : As I had the honor to 
present to this Convention the name of Thomas Ewiug, Jr., of Kansas, I 
now desire, on behalf of his friends, and at his instance, to withdraw his 
name, and move that the nomination of Frank P. Blair be made by acclamation. 

The Name of Dodge withdrawn. 

Mr. O'Neil, of Iowa. — In view of the almost unanimous sentiment of 
this Convention, I beg leave, in the name of the Iowa Delegation, to with- 
draw the name of General Dodge, and to second the nomination of General 
Frank P. Blair. (Cheers.) 

The Nomination of Blair. 

Mr. Bigler, of Pennsylvania. — As I have understood the ruling of the 
Chair, it has been that it is required that the States be called, and the ballot 
cast. I move that the rule be suspended, and that the nomination of Francis 
P. Blair be made by acclamation. 

There being expressions of dissent, Mr. Bigler withdrew his motion. 

The Secretary then proceeded with the call of States. 

The Chairman of the Alabama Delegation being called, said, — 

I take pleasure in casting the votes of my State for that accomplished sol- 
dier of the Union Army, General Francis P. Blair. 

The Chairman' of the Arkansas Delegation. — Arkansas casts her entire 
vote for Francis P. Blair. 

The Chairman of the California Delegation. — California having been the 
first to nominate, now cordially casts her entire vote for Francis P. Blair. 

The Chairman of the Connecticut Delegation. — Connecticut casts her six 
votes for General Blair. 

The Chairman of the Delaware Delegation. — Delaware casts her three 
votes for General Blair. 

The Chairman of the Florida Delegation. — Florida casts her three votes 
for General Francis P. Blair. 

The Chairman of the Georgia Delegation. — Georgia casts her nine votes 
for General Blair. 

The Chairman of the Illinois Delegation. — Illinois casts her entire vote 
for Frank P. Blair. 

The Chairman of the Indiana Delegation. — Indiana casts twelve aud a 
half votes for Francis P. Blair, one-half being absent. 

Several Delegates. — Make it unanimous. 

The Chairman of the Indiaua Delegation. — We make it unanimous. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 169 

The Chairman of the Iowa Delegation. — Iowa casts her eight votes for 
General Blair. 

The Chairman of the Kansas Delegation. — Kansas is for the first time 
united, and casts her three votes solid for Frank P. Blair. (Laughter.) 

The Chairman of the Kentucky Delegation. — Kentucky gives her entire 
vote for General Blair. 

The Chairman of the Louisiaua Delegation. — Louisiana casts her seven 
votes for General Blair. 

The Chairman of the Maine Delegation. — Maine casts her seven votes 
for General Blair. 

The Chairman of the Maryland Convention. — Maryland casts her seven 
votes for General Frank P. Blair. 

The Chairman of the Massachusetts Delegation. — The State of Massa- 
chusetts casts her twelve votes for Frank P. Blair. (Applause.) 

The Chairman of the Michigan Delegation. — The State of Michigan casts 
her eight votes for Frank P. Blair. 

The Chairman of the Minnesota Delegation. — Minnesota casts her full 
vote for General Frank P. Blair. 

The Chairman of the Mississippi Delegation. — Mississippi casts her full 
vote for General Blair. 

The Chairman of the Missouri Delegation. — Missouri casts her eleven 
votes for General Blair. 

The Chairman of the Nebraska Delegation. — Nebraska casts her vote for 
Genei'al Blair. 

The Chairman of the Nevada Delegation. — Nevada casts her vote for 
General Blair. 

The Chairman of the New Hampshire Delegation. — New Hampshire casts 
her vote for General Blair. 

Mr. Kierxax, of New York. — In the absence of the Chairman, I am 
directed by the delegation to say that New York casts thirty-three votes for 
General Blair. (Applause.) 

The Chairman of the North Carolina Delegation. — North Carolina casts 
her vote for General Blair. 

The Chairman of the Ohio Delegation. — Ohio casts twenty-one votes for 
General Blair. 

The Chairman of the Oregon Delegation. — Oregon casts her three votes 
for General Francis P. Blair. 

The Chairman of the Pennsylvania Delegation. — Pennsylvania casts her 
twenty-six votes for General Blair, and proposes, next November, to cast 
her electoral vote for Seymour and Blair by more than twenty thousand 
majority. (Applause.) 

The Chairman of the Rhode Island Delegation. — Rhode Island casts her 
four votes for General Blair. 

The Chairman of the South Carolina Delegation. — South Carolina casts 
her six votes for General Blair. 

The Chairman of the Tennessee Delegation. — Mr. Chairman : It is the 
pleasure of the Tennessee delegation that the vote of the State of Tennessee 
shall be cast, by a distinguished Southern soldier, whom I have the honor to 
present to the Convention, N. B. Forrest. (Great applause.) 



170 



OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 



General FORRBST. — I have the pleasure, sir, to cast the vote of Tennessee 
for General Blair; and I wish to take this occasion to thank the delegates 
here for the kind and uniformly courteous treatment that the Southern 
delegates have received at this Convention. (Great cheering.) 

The CHAIRMAN of the Texas Delegation. — Mr. President, the Texas dele- 
gation desire that a distinguished soldier from that State should respond 
for it. 

General Smitii, of Texas. — Mr. President, I esteem it a great honor that 
I have been requested by the Chairman of the Texas delegation, and the 
members of that delegation, on this occasion, to cast the six votes of 
the State of Texas for Major-General Frank P. Blair. It is an evidence that 
the soldiers of Texas, who fought through the Confederate war, will give, 
when we come to vote, as warm a reception in the support of General Frank 
P. Blair, as we gave him on the field of battle from the commencement of 
the war to the end of it. (Cheers.) 

The Chairman of the Vermont Delegation. — Five votes for General Blair. 

The Chairman of the Virginia Delegation. — The State of Virginia euds 
where she begun, and casts ten votes for General Blair. 

The CHAIRMAN of the West Virginia Delegation. — West Virginia casts her 
five votes for Francis P. Blair. 

The Chairman of the Wisconsin Delegation. — Wisconsin casts her eight 
votes for General Frank P. Blair, Jr. 



The Announcement of the Result. 
The S&CRETARY. — The vote stands upon Vice-President, as follows, — 
Whole vote of the Electoral College, 317, which were given unanimously for 
Frank P. Blair, of Missouri. 

The following is a table of the first ballot for Vice-President, — 



Blair. 

Alabama 8 

A rkansas 5 

California 5 

Connecticut 6 

Delaware 3 

Florida 3 

Georgia 9 

Illinois 16 

Indiana 3 

Iowa 18 

Kansas '. 3 

Kentucky 11 

Louisiana 7 

Maine 7 

Maryland 7 

Massachusetts 12 

Michigan 8 

Minnesota 4 

Mississippi 7 

Missouri 11 

Three hearty cheers greeted this announcement, and another 
scene of enthusiasm ensued. 



Blair. 

Nebraska 3 

Nevada 3 

New Hampshire 5 

New Jersey 7 

New York 33 

North Carolina 9 

Ohio 21 

Oregon 3 

Pennsylvania 26 

Rhode Island -4 

South Carolina 6 

Tennessee 10 

Texas 6 

Vermont 5 

Virginia 10 

West Virginia 5 

W isconsin 8 



Total 317 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 171 

The PRESIDENT pro tem.— The unanimous vote of the Convention having 
been cast for Frank P. Blair, Jr., of Missouri, for Vice-President, he is declared 
the candidate of the Democratic party for Vice-President. (Great cheering.) 

Mr. Cox, of New York. — I only rise to make a motion. We have made 
an unanimous declaration of Democratic principles ; we have made an 
unanimous choice of our candidate for President, and I move, sir, that our 
nomination for Vice-President be made unanimous by both delegations aud 
audience. 

A voice in the galleries, " With a will." 

Another scene of intense enthusiasm and excitement followed, 
delegates and audience rising to their feet, and joining in cheer after 
cheer. 

Committee to Wait on the Nominees. 

Mr. McDonald, of Indiana, offered the following resolution, — 

Resolved, That a committee of one from each State be appointed by this 
Convention to inform the nominees of the action of this Convention, and to 
tender them the nominations made here to-day; and that the members of the 
committee be named by the delegations of the several States. 

The question was taken, and the resolution adopted. 
Mr. "Woodward, of Pennsylvania, offered the following resolu- 
tion, — 

Resolved, That the proceedings of the Convention be prepared, and pub- 
lished iu pamphlet form, by E. 6. Perrin, Secretary of the Convention. 

The President pro tern. — If there be no objection, the resolution will be 
considered as agreed to. 

No o ejection was made. 

The Secretary. — 1 am requested to read the following telegraphic de- 
spatch, — 

Lancaster, Pennsylvania, July 9, 1868. 
A. J. Steinman, Pennsylvania Delegation, — 

The Democratic voters of this city are now firing fifty guns for the nom- 
ination of Horatio Seymour, and his nomination is received with the greatest 
enthusiasm and satisfaction. 

George W. Kexdrick. 

Mr. A. A. Purman, of Pennsylvania, offered the following, — 

Resolved, That the cordial thanks of the delegates of the National Conven- 
tion are extended to the citizens of the city of New York lor their large- 
hearted courtesy, and generous hospitality, during their session in this 
metropolis, the only great city which never faltered iu her devotion to the 
Democracy, the Constitution, and the laws. (Cheers.) 

The question was taken and the resolution adopted. 

Mr. White, of Maryland, offered the following resolution, — 

Resolved, That the thanks of this Convention are hereby tendered to the 
President and other officers of the Convention, for the able, impartial, and 
most satisfactory manner in which they have discharged their respective 
duties. 

The resolution was adopted with cheers. 



172 OFFICIAL PliOCEEDINGS OF THE 

Mr. Vallandigiiam offered the following resolution, — 

Besolved, That this Convention sympathize cordially with the working-men 
of the United States in their efforts to protect the rights and promote the 
interests of the laboring classes of the country. 

The resolution was adopted. 

The President, pro tern. — The roll of States will now be called, and the 
chairmen of delegations will please name each a member of the Committee 
to wait upon the Candidates for President and Vice-President, and inform 
them of their nomination. 

A delegate moved that the Territories be represented in the com- 
mittee. 

The President, pro tern. — Unless there is objection to that proposition, it 
will be considered agreed to. 

No objection was made. 

Mr. Sansom, of Pennsylvania, offered the following resolution, — 

Besolved, That the thanks of the delegates of this Convention be tendered 
to the Tammany Society for the use of their splendid hall, and to the Man- 
hattan Club of this city for their generous hospitality. 

The resolution w r as adopted. 

Mr. Kerr, of Penns} T lvania, offered the following resolution, — 

Unsolved, That we tender our thanks to the press of New York for its 
faithful report of the proceedings of this Convention. 

The resolution was adopted. 

Mr. S. S. Cox, of New York. — I wish to suggest that our distinguished Sec- 
retary announce that there will be a ratification to-night in Union Square of the 
nominations of this Convention, at eight o'clock, and that delegations have 
expressed their hope that Tammany Hall will take charge of it. (Cheers.) 

The Secretary. — I am requested to announce that there will be a ratifica- 
tion meeting to-night in Union Square at eight o'clock, and that everybody 
and his wife are expected to be present. (Laughter.) 

The Secretary read the list of the Committee appointed to wait on 
Candidates, and inform them of their Nomination, as follows, — 

Committee to inform the Nominees of their Nomination, 

Alabama. — Michael J. Bulger. 
Arkansas. — P. O. Thweatt. 
California. — Joseph Roberts. 
Connecticut. — James A. Hovey. 
Delaware. — Thomas B. Bradford. 
Florida. — Wilkinson Call. 
Georgia. — Colonel D. P. Hill. 
Illinois. — William C. Gondy. 
Indiana. — General Mahlon D. Manson. 
Iowa. — Hon. A. C. Dodge. 
Kansas. — Isaac Sharpe. 
Kentucky. — General William Preston. 



• NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 173 

Louisiana. — Thomas Allen Clarke. 

Maine. — R. B. Rice. 

Maryland. — William Pinckney White. 

Massachusetts. — J. G. Abbott. 

Michigan. — Hon. C. E. Stuart. 

Minnesota. — Willis A. Gorman. 

Mississippi. — W. H. McCardle. 

Missouri. — General Thomas L. Price. 

Nebraska. — George L. Miller. 

Nevada. — D. E. Buel. 

New Hampshire. — Albert W. Hatch. 

New Jersey. — Henry S. Little. 

New York. — Francis Kernan. 

North Carolina. — M. W. Rausora. 

Ohio. — General George W. Morgan. 

Oregon. — N. R. Bell. 

Pennsylvania. — Colonel William C. Patterson. 

Bhode Island. — Thomas Steere. 

South Carolina. — J. B. Campbell. 

Tennessee. — General William D. Bate. 

Texas. — F. S. Stockdale. 

Vermont. — P. S. Benjamin. 

Virginia. — General James L. Kemper. 

West Virginia. — John A. Martin. 

Wisco7isin. — George Reed. 

Montana. — General Greene Clay Smith. 

Idaho. — Thomas W. Betts. 

New Mexico. — Robert B. Mitchell. 

Arizona. — Thomas E. Evershed. 

Colorado. — General William Craig. 

Mr. Kernan, of New York, offered the following, — 

Resolved, That the thanks of the Convention are tendered to Chief Justice 
Salmon P. Chase for the justice, dignity, and impartiality with which he 
presided over the Court of Impeachment on the trial of President Andrew 
Johnson. 

Applause and cries, " We have already clone that." 
The resolution was adopted. 

General McCooK, of Ohio. — I move, sir, that this Convention, having per- 
formed its important duties, do now adjourn sine die. 

The motion was put by the chair, and carried ; and at fifty minutes 
past three o'clock the Convention adjourned sine die, amid enthusiastic 
cheers for Seymour and Blair. 



174 



OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 











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NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 175 



National Democratic Committee, 

Hon. August Belmont, New York, Chairman. 

Hon. Frederick 0. Prince, Boston, Mass., Secretary and Treasurer. 

Alabama. — John Forsyth, Mobile. 

Arkansas. — John M. Harrell, Little Rock. 

California. — John Bigler, Sacramento City. 

Connecticut. — William Converse, Franklin. 

Delaware. — Samuel Townsend, Newcastle. 

Florida. — Charles E. Dyke, Tallahassee. 

Georgia. — A. H. Colquitt, Albany. 

Illinois. — Wilbur F. Storey, Chicago. 

Indiana. — William E. Niblack, Vincennes. 

Iowa. — Daniel 0. Finch, Des Moines. 

Kansas. — Isaac E. Eaton, Leavenworth City. 

Kentucky. — Thomas C. McCkeary, Owensboro. 

Louisiana. — James McCloskey, New Orleans. 

Maine. — Sylyanus R. Lymax, Portland. 

Maryland. — Odin Bowie, Prince George. 

Michigan. — William A. Moore, Detroit. 

Minnesota. — Charles W. Nash, St. Paul. 

Mississippi. — Charles E. Hooker, Jackson. 

Missouri. — Charles A. Mantz, St. Louis. 

Nebraska. — G. L. Miller, Omaha. 

Nevada. — J. W. McCorkie, Virginia City. 

New Hampshire. — Harry Bingham, Littleton. 

New Jersey. — John McGregor, Newark. 

North Carolina. — Thomas Bragg, Raleigh. 

Ohio. — John G. Thompson, Columbus. 

Oregon. — J. C. Hawthorne, Portland. 

Pennsylvania. — Isaac Eskister, Lancaster. 

Iihode Island. — Gideon Bradford, Providence. 

South Carolina. — Charles H. Simonton, Charleston. 

Tennessee. — John W. Leftwich, Memphis. 

Texas. — John Hancock, Austin. 

Vermont. — H. B. Smith, Milton. 

Virginia. — John Goode, Norfolk. 

West Virginia. — John Hall, Port Pleasant. 

Wisconsin. — Frederick W. Horn, Cedarburg. 



Executive Committee. 

Hon. August Belmont, Hon. John G. Thompson, 

" James McCloskey, " Isaac E. Eaton, 

" John Forsyth, " John McGregor, 

" John W. Leftwich, " William M. Converse, 

" Wilbur F. Storey, " F. 0. Prince. 



176 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 



Letter of Acceptance from Hon. Horatio Seymour. 

Utica, August 4. 

Gentlemen: When, in the city of New York on the 11th of Jul}', in the 
presence of a vast multitude, on behalf of the National Democratic Conven- 
tion, you tendered to me its unanimous nomination as its candidate for the 
office of President of the United States, I stated I had no words " adequate 
to express my gratitude for the good-will and kindness which that body had 
shown to me. Its nomination was unsought and unexpected. It was my 
ambition to take an active part, from which I am now excluded, in the great 
struggle going on for the restoration of good government, of peace and 
prosperity to our country. But I have been caught up by the whelming tide 
which is bearing us on to a great political change, and I find myself unable 
to resist its pressure. You have also given me a copy of the resolutions put 
forth by the Convention, showing its position upon all the great questions 
which now agitate the country. As the presiding officer of that Convention, 
I am familiar with their scope and import; as one of its members, I am a 
party to their terms. They are in accord with my views, and I stand upon 
them in the contest upon which we are now entering, aud shall strive to 
carry them out in future, wherever I may be placed iu political or private 
life." 

I then stated that I would send you these words of acceptance iu a letter, 
as is the customary form. I see no reason, upon reflection, to chauge or 
qualify the terms of my approval of the resolutions of the Convention. 

I have delayed the mere formal act of communicating to you in writing 
what I thus publicly said, for the purpose of seeing what light the action of 
Congress would throw upon the interests of the country. Its acts, since the 
adjournment of the Convention, show an alarm lest a chauge of political 
power will give to the people what they ought to have, — a clear statement 
of what has been done with the money drawn from them during the past 
eight years. Thoughtful men feel that there have been wrongs in the finan- 
cial management which have been kept from the public knowledge. The 
Congressional party has not only allied itself with military power, which is 
to be brought to bear directly upon the elections in maivy States, but it also 
holds itself in perpetual session, with the avowed purpose of making such 
laws as it shall see flt, in view of the elections which will take place within 
a lew weeks. It did not, therefore, adjourn, but took a recess, to meet again 
if its partisan interests shall demaud its reassembling. Never before in the 
history of our country has Congress thus taken a menacing attitude towards 
its electors. Under its influence, some of the States organized by its agents 
are proposing to deprive the people of the right to vote for Presidential elec- 
tors, and tL»j first bold steps are taken to destroy the rights of suffrage. It is 
not strange, therefore, that thoughtful men see in such action the proof that 
there are with those who shape the policy of the Republican party, motives 
stronger and deeper than the mere wish to hold political power; that there is 
a dread of some exposure which drives them on to acts so desperate and im- 
politic. 

Many of the ablest leaders aud journals of the Republican party have 
openly deplored the violence of congressional action, and its tendency to 
keep up discord iu our country. The great interests of our Union demand 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. Ill 

' peace, order, and a return to those industrial pursuits without which we can- 
not maintain the faith or honor of our government. The miuds of business 
men *are perplexed by uncertainties. The hours of toil of our laborers are 
lengthened by the costs of living made by the direct and indirect exactions of 
government. Our people are harassed by the heavy and frequent demands 
of the tax-gatherer. Without distiuction of party, there is a strong feeling 
in favor of that line of action which shall restore order and confidence, and 
shall lift off the burthens which now hinder and vex the industry of the 
country. Yet, at this moment, those in power have thrown into the Senate 
Chamber and Congressional Hall new elements of discord and violence. 
Men have been admitted as representatives of some of the Southern States, 
with the declaration upon their lips that they cannot live in the States they 
claim to represent, without military protection. These men are to make 
laws for the North as well as the South. These men, who, a few days since, 
were seeking as suppliants that Congress would give them power within 
their respective States are, to-day, the masters and controllers of the actions 
of those bodies. Entering them with minds filled with passions, their first 
demands have been that Congress shall look upon the States from which they 
come as in conditions of civil war; that the majority of their populations, 
embracing their intelligence, shall be treated as public enemies ; that military 
forces shall be kept up at the cost of the people of the North, and that there 
shall be no peace and order at the South save that which is made by arbitrary 
power. Every intelligent man knows that these men owe their seats in Con- 
gress to the disorder in the South; every man knows that they not only owe 
their present positions to disorder, but that every motive springing from the 
love of power, of gain, of a desire for vengeance, prompts them to keep 
the South in anarchy. While that exists, they are independent of the wills 
or wishes of their fellow-citizens. While confusion reigns, they are the 
dispensers of the profits and the honors which grow out of the government 
of mere force. These men are now placed in positions where they cannot 
urge their views of policy, but where they can enforce them. When others 
shall be admitted in this manner from the remaining Southern States, al- 
though they will have, in truth, no constituents, they will have more power 
in the Senate than a majority of the people of this Union living in nine of the 
great States. In vain the wisest members of the Republican party protested 
against the policy that led to this result. While the chiefs of the late rebel- 
lion have submitted to the results of the war, and are now quietly engaged 
in useful pursuits for the support of themselves and their families, and are 
trying, by the force of their example, to lead back the people of the South to 
the order and industry, not only essential to their well-being, but to the great- 
ness and prosperity of our common country, we see, that those who, without 
ability or influence, have been thrown, by the agitations of civil convulsion, 
into positions of honor and profit, are striving to keep alive the passions to 
which they owe their elevation. And they clamorously insist that they are 
the only friends of our Union, — a Union that can only have a sure founda- 
tion in fraternal regard, and a common desire to promote the peace, the order, 
and the happiness of all sections of our land. 

Events in Congress, since the adjournment of the Convention, have vastly 
increased the importance of a political victory by those who are seeking to 
bring back economy, simplicity, and justice in the administration of our 
12 



178 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

national affairs. Many Republicans have heretofore clung to their party who 
have regretted the extremes of violence to which it has run. They have 
cherished a faith that while the action of their political friends has been mis- 
taken, their motives have been good. They must now see that the Repub- 
lican party is in that condition that it cannot carry out a wise and peaceful 
policy, whatever its motives may be. It is a misfortune, not only to a 
country, but to a governing party itself, when its action is unchecked by any 
form of opposition. It has been the misfortune of the Republican party that 
the events of the past few years have given it so much power that it has been 
able to shackle the Executive, to trammel the Judiciary, and to carry out the 
views of the most unwise and violent of its members. When this state of 
things exists in any party, it has ever been found that the sober judgments 
of its ablest leaders do not control. There is hardly an able man who helped 
to build up the Republican organization, who has not, within the past three 
years, warned it against its excesses, who has not been borne clown and 
forced to give up his convictions of what the interests of the country called 
for; or, if too patriotic to do this, who has not been driven from its ranks. 
If this has been the case heretofore, what will be its action now with this 
new infusion of men, who, without a decent respect for the views of those 
who had just given them their positions, begin their legislative career with 
calls for arms, with demands that their States shall be regarded as in a con- 
dition of civil war, and with a declaration that they are ready and anxious to 
degrade the President of the United States whenever they can persuade or 
force Congress to bring forward new articles of impeachment? 

The Republican party, as well as we, are interested in putting some check 
upon this violence. It must be clear to every thinking man that a division 
of political power tends to check the violence of party action, and to assure 
the peace and good order of society. The election of a Democratic Execu- 
tive, and a majority of Democratic members to the House of Represent- 
atives, would not give to that party organization the power to make sudden 
or violent changes, but it would serve to check those extreme measures 
which have been deplored by the best men of both political organizations. 
The result would most certainly lead to that peaceful restoration of the 
Union and re-establishment of fraternal relationship, which the country 
desires. I am sure that the best men of the Republican party deplore, as 
deeply as I do, the spirit of violence shown by those recently admitted to 
seats in Congress from the South. The condition of civil war, which they 
contemplate, must be abhorrent to every right-thinking man. 

I have no mere personal wishes which mislead my judgment in regard to 
the pending election. No man who has weighed and measured the duties of 
the office of President of the United States can fail to be impressed with the 
cares and toils of him who is to meet its demands. It is not merely to float 
with popular currents, without a policy or a purpose. On the contrary, 
while our Constitution gives just weight to the public will, its distinguishing 
feature is that it seeks to protect the rights of minorities. Its greatest glory 
is that it puts restraints upon power. It gives force and form to those 
maxims and principles of civil liberty for which the martyrs of freedom have 
struggled through ages. It declares the right of the people "to be secure 
in their persons, houses, and papers, against unreasonable searches and 
seizures; that Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 179 

of religion, or the free exercise thereof, or abridging the freedom of speech, 
or of the press, or the right of the people to petition for redress of griev- 
ances." It secures the " right of a speedy and public trial by an impartial 
jury." 

No man can rightfully enter upon the duties of the Presidential office, unless 
he is not only willing to carry out the wishes of the people, expressed in a 
constitutional way, but is also prepared to stand up for the rights of minor- 
ities. He must be ready to uphold the free exercise of religion. He must 
denounce measures which would wrong personal or home rights, or the 
religious conscience of the humblest citizen of the land. He must maintain, 
without distinction of creed or nationality, all the privileges of American 
citizenship. 

The experience of every public man who has been faithful to his trust 
teaches him that no one can do the duties of the office of President, unless he 
is ready not only to undergo the falsehoods and abuse of the bad, but to suffer 
from the ceusure of the good, who are misled by prejudices and misrepresen- 
tations. There are no attractions in such a position which deceive my judg- 
ment, when I say that a great change is going on in the public mind. The 
mass of the Republican party are more thoughtful, temperate, and just than 
they were during the excitements which attended the progress and close of 
the civil war. As the energy of the Democratic party springs from their 
devotion to their cause and not to their candidates, I may with propriety 
speak of the fact that never in the political history of our country has the 
action of any like body been hailed with such universal and wide-spread en- 
thusiasm as that which has been shown in relation to the position of the 
National Democratic Convention. With this the candidates had nothing to 
do. Had any others of those named been selected, this spirit would have 
been, perhaps, more marked. The zeal and energy of the conservative masses 
spring from a desire to make a change of political policy, and from the confi- 
dence that they can carry out their purpose. 

In this faith they are strengthened by the co-operation of the great body of 
those who served in the Union army and navy during the war. Having given 
nearly sixteen thousand commissions to the officers of that army, I know 
their views and wishes. They demand the Union for which they fought. 
The largest meeting of these gallant soldiers which ever assembled was held 
in New York, and endorsed the action of the National Convention. In words 
instinct with meaning, they called upon the government to stop in its policy 
of hate, discord, and disunion, and, in terms of fervid eloquence, they de- 
manded the restoration of the rights and liberties of the American people. 

When there is such accord between those who proved themselves brave 
and self-sacrificing in war, and those who are thoughtful and patriotic in 
council, I cannot doubt we shall gain a political triumph which will restore 
our Union, bring back peace and prosperity to our land, and will give us 
once more the blessings of a wise, economical, and honest government. 
I am, gentleman, truly yours, etc., 

HORATIO SEYMOUR. 

To Gen. W. G. Morgan, and others, Committee, etc., etc. 



180 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 



Letter of Acceptance from Gen. Frank P. Blair, Jr. 

General, — I take the earliest opportunity of replying to your letter noti- 
fying me of my nomination for Vice-President of the United States, by the 
National Democratic Convention recently held in the city of New York. 

I accept, without hesitation, the nomination tendered in a manner so grati- 
fying, and give you and the Committee my thanks for the very kind and com- 
plimentary lauguage in which you have conveyed to me the decision of the 
Convention. 

I have carefully read the resolutions adopted by the Convention, and most 
cordially concur in every principle and sentiment they announce. 

My opinions upon all the questions which discriminate the great contending 
parties have been freely expressed on all suitable occasions, and I do not 
deem it necessary at this time to reiterate them. 

The issues upon which the contest turns are clear, and caunot be obscured 
or distorted by the sophistries of our adversaries. They all resolve them- 
selves into the old and ever-recurriug struggle of a few men to absorb the 
political power of the nation. This effort, under every conceivable name and 
disguise, has always characterized the opponents of the Democratic party, 
but at no time has the attempt assumed a shape so open and daring as in this 
contest. The adversaries of free and constitutional government, in defiance 
of the express language of the Constitution, have erected a military despotism 
in ten of the States of the Union, have taken from the President the power 
vested in him by the supreme law, and have deprived the Supreme Court of 
its jurisdiction. The right of trial by jury, and the great writ of right, the 
habeas corpus, — shields of safety for every citizen, which have descended to 
us from the earliest traditions of our ancestors, and which our Revolutionary 
fathers sought to secure to their posterity forever in the fundamental charter 
of our liberties, — have been ruthlessly trampled under foot by the fragment 
of a Congress ; whole States and communities of people of our race have been 
attainted, convicted, condemned, and deprived of their rights as citizens, 
without presentment, or trial, or witnesses, but by congressional enactment 
of ex post facto laws, and in defiance of the constitutional prohibition denying 
even to a full and loyal Congress the authority to pass any bill of attainder 
or ex post facto law. The same usurping authority has substituted as electors 
in place of the men of our race, thus illegally attainted and disfranchised, a 
host of ignorant negroes who are supported in idleness with the public money, 
and are combined together to strip the white race of their birthright through 
the management of freedmen's bureaus and emissaries of conspirators in 
other States. And, to complete the oppression, the military power of the 
nation has been placed at their disposal, in order to make this barbarism 
supreme. The military leader, under whose prestige this usurping Congress 
has taken refuge since the condemnation of their schemes by the free people 
of the North, in the elections of the last year, and whom they have selected 
as their candidate, to shield themselves from the result of their own wicked- 
ness and crime, has announced his acceptance of the nomination, and his 
willingness to maintain their usurpations over eight millions of white people 
at the South, fixed to the earth with his bayonets. He exclaims, " Let us 
have peace!" "Peace reigns in Warsaw" was the announcement which 
heralded the doom of the liberties of a nation. " The empire is peace," ex- 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 181 

claimed Bonaparte, when freedom and its defenders expired under the sharp 
edge of his sword The peace to which Grant invites us is the peace of des- 
potism and death. Those who seek to restore the Constitution by executing 
the will of the people condemning the reconstruction acts, already pronounced 
in the elections of last year (and which will, I am convinced, be still more 
emphatically expressed by the election of the Democratic candidate as Presi- 
dent of the United States), are denounced as revolutionists by the partisans 
of this vindictive Congress. Negro Suffrage (which the popular vote of New 
York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Michigan, Connecticut, and other 
States has condemned as expressly against the letter of the Constitution) 
must stand, because their Senators and Representatives have willed it. If 
the people shall again condemn these atrocious measures by the election of 
the Democratic candidate for President, they must not be disturbed! Al- 
though decided to be unconstitutional by the Supreme Court, and although 
the President is sworn to sustain and support the Constitution, the will of a 
fraction of a Congress, reinforced with its partisan emissaries sent to the 
South, and supported there by the soldiery, must stand against the will of the 
people, and the decision of the Supreme Court, and the solemn oath of the 
President, to maintain and support the Constitution ! It is revolutionary to 
execute the will of the people ! It is revolutionary to execute the judgment 
of the Supreme Court ! It is revolutionary in the President to keep inviolate 
his oath to sustain the Constitution ! This false construction of the vital 
principle of our Government is the last resort of those who would have their 
arbitrary reconstruction sway and supersede our time-honored institutions. 
The nation will say that the Constitution must be restored, and the will of 
the people again prevail. The appeal to the peaceful ballot to attain this end 
is not war, — is not revolution. They make war and revolution who attempt 
to arrest this quiet mode of putting aside military despotism and the usurpa- 
tions of a fragment of a Congress, asserting absolute power over that benign 
system of regulated liberty left us by our fathers. This must be allowed to 
take its course. This is the only road to peace. It will come with the elec- 
tion of the Democratic candidate, and not with the election of that mailed 
warrior, whose bayonets are now at the throats of eight millions of people in 
the South, to compel them to support him as a candidate for the Presidency, 
and to submit to the domination of an alien race of semi-barbarous men. 
No perversion of truth, or audacity of misrepresentation, can exceed that 
which hails this candidate in arms as an angel of peace. 

I am, very l'espectfully, your most obedient servant, 

FRANK P. BLAIR. 
To Gen. G. W. Morgan, and others. 






182 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 



Organization of the National Democratic Committee. 

New York, July 9, 1868. 

The members of the new National Democratic Committee, consisting of 
one representative from each State, met this day at the rooms of the Com- 
mittee, in Tammany Hall, New York. 

Mr. Frederick O. Prince, Secretary of the retiring committee, called the 
meeting to order, and called the roll of members, as follows, — 

LIST OF MEMBERS. 

Alabama. — John Forsyth, Mobile. 
Arkansas. — John M. Harrell, Little Rock. 
California. — John Bigler, Sacramento City. 
Connecticut. — William M. Converse, Franklin. 
Delaware. — Samuel Townsend, Newcastle. 
Florida. — Charles E. Dyke, Tallahassee. 
Georgia. — A. II. Colquitt, Albany. 
Illinois. — Wilbur F. Storey, Chicago. 
Indiana. — William E. Niblack, Vincennes. 
Iowa. — Daniel O. FiNcn, Des Moines. 
Kansas. — Isaac E. Eaton, Leavenworth City. 
Kentucky. — Thomas C. McCreary, Owensboro. 
Louisiana. — James McCloskey, New Orleans. 
Maine. — Sylvanus R. Lyman, Portland. 
Maryland. — Odin Bowie, Prince George. 
Massachusetts. — Frederick O. Prince, Boston. 
Michigan. — William A. Moore, Detroit. 
Minnesota. — Charles W. Nash, St. Paul. 
Mississippi. — Charles E. Hooker, Jackson. 
Missouri. — Charles A. Mantz, St. Louis. 
Nebraska. — G. L. Miller, Omaha. 
Nevada. — J. W. McCorkie, Virginia City. 
New Hampshire. — Harry Bingham. Littleton. 
New Jersey. — John McGregor, Newark. 
New York — August Belmont, New York City. 
North Carolina. — Thomas Bragg, Raleigh. 
Ohio. — John G. Thompson, Columbus. 
Oregon. — J. C. Hawthorne, Portland. 
Pennsylvania. — Isaac Eskister, Lancaster. 
Hhode Island. — Gideon Bradford, Providence. 
South Carolina. — Charles H. Slmonton, Charleston. 
Tennessee. — John W. Leftwich, Memphis. 
Texas. — John Hancock, Austin. 
Vermont. — H. B. Smith, Milton. 
Virginia. — John Goode, Norfolk. 
West Virginia. — John Hall, Port Pleasant. 
Wisconsin. — Frederick W. Horn, Cedarburg. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 183 

THE TEMPORARY ORGANIZATION. 

Mr. Wilbur F. Storey, of Illinois, was unanimously elected temporary 
Chairman, and * 

Mr. Frederick O. Prince, of Massachusetts, was unanimously elected 
temporary Secretary of the Committee. 

THE PERMANENT ORGANIZATION. 

It having been moved and voted to proceed to the permanent organization 
of the Committee, the Hon. August Belmont was elected Chairman, and 
the Hon. Frederick O. Prince, Secretary of the Committee. 

A motion was made to dispense with an Executive Committee, but was 
not carried. 

It was voted that a Committee of five be appointed by the Chairman to 
select an Executive Committee; and Messrs. Storey of Illinois, Lyman of 
Maine, Leftwich of Tennessee, McGregor of New Jersey, and McCorkie of 
Nevada, were appointed to such Committee. 

The Committee subsequently reported, recommending the following gentle- 
men to constitute 

THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

August Belmont, New York. 

John McGregor, Newark, New Jersey. 

William M. Converse, Franklin, Connecticut. 

Wilbur F. Storey, Chicago, Illinois. 

John G. Thompson, Columbus, Ohio. 

Isaac E. Eaton, Leavenworth City, Kansas. 

James McCloskey, New Orleans, Louisiana. 

John Forsyth, Mobile, Alabama. 

John W. Leftwich, Memphis, Tennessee. 

Frederick O. Prince, Boston, Massachusetts. 
It was voted that Mr. Frederick O. Prince be the Treasurer of the 
National Committee. 

It was voted that the subject of the appointment of a Congressional 
Democratic Committee at Washington be referred to the Executive 
Committee. 

congressional democratic committee. 
The following gentlemen were appointed as the Congressional Democratic 
Committee, — 

Hon. J. R. Doolittle, U. S. Senator, Wisconsin. 
Hon. C. R. Buckalew, U. S. Senator, Pennsylvania. 
Hon. Samuel J. Randall, M. C, Pennsylvania. 
Hon. James M. Humphrey, M. C, New York. 
Hon. Wm. H. Barnum, M. C, Connecticut. 
Hon. Lewis W. Ross, M. C, Illinois. 
Hon. Lawrence S. Trlmble, M. C, Kentucky. 
Hon. Montgomery Blair, Washington City. 
Jonah D. Hoover, Esq., " " 

CHARLES^ASON, ESQ., " " 

General Thomas Ewing, Jr., " "